literature

English Department's 38th Annual Awards Day

Date: 
Friday, April 26, 2019 - 2:30pm
Location: 
Lexmark Room - Main Building

Frankenstein Forever

Date: 
Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Marksbury Theatre
Tags/Keywords:
Join us for the celebration of the 200th anniversary of Frankenstein!
 
Horror contest & refreshments @ 7:00 PM
Screening of Young Frankenstein @ 7:30 PM
 
Sponsored by: Sigma
Tau Delta and
English 230

Lisa Zunshine on Why Fiction Does it Better

An essay by Lisa Zunshine, a University of Kentucky professor of English, appears in the Dec. 13 edition of The Chronicle Review.

Disturbing The Peace With Poetry: Julia Johnson

There is word on the page and then there is word given breath. This past April, students and faculty from the University of Kentucky brought words to life thanks to a 12-hour open air poetry reading. The event, organized by English professor and published author Julia Johnson, was held outside of the Student Center welcoming anyone and everyone to come read their favorite poems aloud. The reading itself was held in celebration of National Poetry Month and to raise awareness of UK’s growing creative writing community. 

In this podcast, we sit down with Professor Julia Johnson who talks about her motivations behind holding the reading and how she hopes the event will help build an even stronger sense of community between the university's creative writers and faculty. Also joining are English department graduate students and editors at UK's literary journal Limestone, Jenna Goldsmith and Robin Rahija who give their thoughts on the poetry reading, Limestone, and the impact of hearing a few beautiful words each day.
 
Finally, we hear a few of those beautiful words from a UK student and from WRD professor Steven Alvarez who reads a poem of his own. 
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Literary Encounters with Vampires: Michael Carter

Since long before the most recent glitzy boom, vampires have been haunting our imaginations and our literature. In a new course being offered this fall, English 130: Literary Encounters - Vampiresthe English department's Michael Carter will introduce students to the storied mythology of vampires whose written history dates back to over a century before Bram Stoker's iconic Dracula.
 
In this podcast, Carter discusses the origins of what we call vampires today; what students can expect in the class through its examination of literature, film, and television; and some of the reasons why Vampires have achieved such eternal cultural relevance including unlikely connections to economics. 

 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Event Honors Appalachian Literary Legend James Still

A symposium to honor the life and literary legacy of James Still, which is free and open to the public, will be held at the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning.

CLA 261: Masterpieces of Greek and Roman Literature with Ted Higgs

A survey of major Greek and Roman literary works. Attention will be focused on the various genres of Classical literature, and the course will include comparative analysis of Greek and Latin literary pieces.

ENG 331: Survey of British Literature I: Beowulf to Milton with Dr. Giancarlo

A survey of British literature from the Old English period (5th-11th century) to the English Commonwealth and Restoration (17th century). Special emphasis is given to Beowulf; medieval romances, drama, and lyric; Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales; Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queene; Renaissance sonnets; Shakespeare's King Lear and Twelfth Night; and John Milton's Paradise Lost. Assignments include reading, on-line lectures/presentations, and some exercises. Grading includes regular quizzes, mid-term, and final. This on-line course fulfills ENG 331 for all the regular English major requirements

New Books in African American Studies

Dr. Vershawn Young discusses Miriam Thaggert's Images of Black Modernism: Verbal and Visual Strategies of the Harlem Renaissance with the author.

For more of Dr. Young's podcast interviews with scholars of African American cultural and literary studies visit the website for New Books in African American Studies: http://newbooksinafroamstudies.com/

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