social theory

Welcome Back & Faculty Fall Meeting

The Committee on Social Theory wants to invite everyone back for the 2016-2017 academic school year!

The fall meeting will feature introductions and information about this years upcoming events, including the Fall Distinguished Speaker, Dr. Elizabeth Shove. There will also be plenty of time for conversation and Q&A over a provided lunch. 

Please RSVP by September 16th to Eva Hicks at eva.hicks@uky.edu

Date: 
Monday, September 26, 2016 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Niles Gallery
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The Committee on Social Theory Presents: Richard Wolff

March 25th, Richard Wolff, Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Visiting Professor, Graduate Program in International Affairs, The New School. Lecture will be held in the Young Library Auditorium, William T. Young Library. Reception to follow at 5:30 p.m. in the Gaines Center Commonwealth House.

"Capitalism vs Democracy: Facing/Solving the Contradiction."

 

 

The Committee on Social Theory Presents: Dr. Lori Watson

 

 

02/05/2016 Lori Watson

The Committee on Social Theory is excited to announce the first lecturer of the Spring Lecture Series, Lori Watson. Lori Watson is Associate Professor of Philosophy and director of the Gender Studies Program, University of San Diego. Dr. Watson's lecture will address "Sex Equality and Public Reason." Reception to follow at 5:30 p.m. in the Gaines Center Commonwealth House.

 

 

The Committee on Social Theory Presents: Dr. Mahmood Mamdani

 

 

The Committee on Social Theory at The University of Kentucky is hosting Professor Mahmood Mamdani as its Fall Distinguished Speaker. On October 2, Dr. Mamdani will give a talk entitled “Political Violence and Political Justice: A Critique of Criminal Justice as Accountability.” The talk will take place at 3:30 pm in the W.T. Young Library Auditorium.

Dr. Mamdani is a Professor of Anthropology, Political Science and African Studies at Columbia University. He is also the Herbert Lehman Professor of Government at Columbia University’s School of Internal Affairs. Additionally, he is the Director of the Makerere Institute of Social Research in Kampala, Uganda.

A native of Uganda, Dr. Mamdani was awarded one of 26 scholarships to study in the United States when Uganda won its independence. After graduating from the University of Pittsburgh, Mamdani joined the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1972. While conducting dissertation research in Uganda he was expelled by Idi Amin. After the overthrow of Amin, Mamdani returned to Uganda, but his citizenship was eventually revoked as a result of his scholarship’s criticism of the government. During his career Mamdani has been visiting professor at the University of Michigan, University of Durban-Westville, the Nuhru Memorial Museum and Library, and Princeton University. He was also the inaugural chair of African studies at the University of Cape Town.

Professor Mamdani’s current work explores the intersection between politics and culture, a comparative study of colonialism since 1452, the history of civil war and genocide in Africa, the Cold War and the War on Terror, and the history and theory of human rights. His most recent book, Saviors and Survivors: Darfur, Politics, and the War on Terror (2009), investigates how conflict in Darfur began as a civil war and transformed into a War on Terror.

 

 

Transnational Lives with William Nericcio

In the final part of this series, this Transnational Lives podcast focuses on social theory and the intersection of Spanish and American culture. In this podcast, Cate Gooch, a graduate student from the Department of English, Josh Martin, a graduate student from Hispanic Studies, and Yorki Encalada, a graduate student from Hispanic Studies, speak with William Nericcio about Mexican transnationalism and the development of his studies with “Mextasy,” his fight against stereotypes.
 
For more information about the lecture series that inspired this podcast series, please head to: Transnational Lives Lecture Series
 
This podcast was produced by Casey Hibbard.  
 

Creative Commons License
Transnational Lives with William Nericcio by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Transnational Lives with Otto Santa Ana

In part two of a four part series, this Transnational Lives podcast focuses upon social theory, language, and society and the roles they play in diversity. In this podcast, Sheryl Means, a graduate student within the College of Education, Anna Stone, a graduate student in English, and Jonathan Tinnin, a graduate student in English, speak with Otto Santa Ana about his work within sociolinguistics, his focus on English and Spanish, and how his interest in this field began. Otto Santa Ana is Professor at the César Chávez Department of Chicana & Chicano Studies, University of California, Los Angeles and his work, spanning across many platforms, focuses on the interplay between language, society, and immigration.

For more information about the lecture series that inspired this podcast series, please head to: Transnational Lives Lecture Series

This podcast was produced by Casey Hibbard

Creative Commons License
Transnational Lives With Otto Santa Ana by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Geography & The Priority of Injustice

 

Justice has been a reference point for radical and critical geographers for more than 40 years. Geographers’ engagements with issues of justice, however, have always been defined by wariness toward political philosophies of justice. These are variously considered too liberal, too distributive in their orientation, or too universalizing. The wariness, in short, indicates the parameters that define the prevalent spatial imaginary of radical and critical human geography: self-consciously oppositional, concerned with the production of structural relations, sensitive to context and difference. Barnett explore two overlapping strands of contemporary political philosophy and political theory that have recently developed arguments for ‘the priority of injustice’ in the elaboration of democratic theory.

Date: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 3:30pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Bldg. - Room 214
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Defining Borders: Social Theory Graduate Course

Every spring the Committee on Social Theory offers the team-taught seminar—always with four professors. Previous course themes/names for the seminar have included “Law, Sex, and Family” “Autobiography,” and “Security.” But previous seminars may not have spoken so directly to the professors’ personal backgrounds as “Transnational Lives” does with this team of four.

A Reading & Conversation with Emily Raboteau

American Book Award winnder Emily Raboteau will read from and discuss her most recent work "Searching for Zion:  The Quest for Home in the African Diaspora"

Sponsored by African American & Africana Studies Program, English Creative Writing Program, Jewish Studies Program, and Social Theory Program.  

Date: 
Thursday, March 26, 2015 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Niles Gallery

They Are Here - Christina Williams and Rachael Hoy

By Victoria Dekle and Brian Connors Manke

Rachael Hoy might be a graduate student in English, but right now her brain is more focused on mapping than sentence fragments.

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