Spring 2016 Courses

English Department SPRING 2016 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
 

Instructor: Michael Carter
ENG 107-001: Introduction to Imaginative Writing MWF 10:00-10:50am
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity)

This introductory course in creative writing will introduce us to various genres: we will play with poetry, fiddle with fiction and nonfiction, and grace our souls with other genres. The class will read and discuss literature in various delightful forms to help us understand technique and voice, and practice writing and critiquing our own and other’s writing. We will often work in small groups (depending on the number enrolled) as a workshopping method for finding our voices as writers, and for helping our classmates find theirs. By the semester’s end, we will have a mini portfolio of writing.


Instructor: Cheryl Cardiff
ENG 107-002: Introduction to Imaginative Writing TR 3:30-4:45pm
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity)

This is an introductory course in creative writing for the novice and curious interested in exploring how poetry and prose can express their ideas. In this class, we will practice a range of written creative expression. Lecture sessions will be devoted partly to “talking craft,” that is, to familiarizing ourselves with various literary and craft elements pertinent to the creative writing genres being practiced and to analyzing how writers employ these elements to put forth a work that captures readers’ imaginations. The other half of our sessions will be devoted to “crafting,” that is, the workshop process that inducts you and fellow beginning writers to experiment with the different creative writing forms studied.

ENG107 satisfies the objectives and outcomes delineated by the Intellectual Inquiry into Arts and Creativity of the UKCore Curriculum, the primary emphasis of which is to define and distinguish different approaches to creativity, demonstrate the ability to critically analyze work produced by other students, and evaluate results of their own creative endeavors.


Instructor: Dan Howell
ENG 107-003: Introduction to Imaginative Writing MW 1-1:50pm + Friday online
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity)

This is an introduction to the craft of imaginative writing and to three of its genres:  fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry.  Students will read and practice writing in those genres, and work frequently in small groups to develop and critique the writing.   Small group work and frequent exercises aside, this is primarily a lecture class.   Our main text will be Burroway’s Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft (4th ed.).


Instructor: Michael Carter
ENG 130-001: Literary Encounters: Banned Books
From Mid-19th Century to Today MWF 9-9:50am
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity)

Why are school districts and some parents afraid of Harry Potter, Huckleberry Finn or others? Why are certain works banned or their characters’ words expunged to gain the books' admittance into the corridors of high schools and libraries? This course will read banned books and examine the historical and cultural reasons for their banishment. Poems such as Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” and Ginsberg’s “Howl” have rallied opponents to suppress their inclusion in anthologies. We’ll try to redeem or reject these texts through close readings and research into the complaints about the books and into the themes of the texts. Coursework will include readings and a portfolio consisting of two or three creative nonfiction pieces, one collaborative project, as well as quizzes, midterm and shorter writing assignments.


Instructor: Frederick Bengtsson
ENG 130-002: Literary Encounters: Revenge TR 9:30-10:45am

(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity)
Revenge: A kind of wild justice, a way of getting retribution when society has failed you, or part of an unending cycle of bloody violence that threatens to destroy society itself? Writers and artists have asked this question for thousands of years, making revenge one of the most enduring literary and artistic themes. From the familial, mythical dramas of the ancient Greeks where wives kills husbands and children kill their parents, to the spectacular violence of Renaissance revenge tragedies where blood flows freely and body parts litter the stage, to the frontier justice of the American Western where the good guys go after the bad guys, this class will consider revenge stories in all their variety, seeing how different times and cultures respond in different ways to this fundamental theme, but also trying to trace similarities and echoes between different periods.


Instructor: Emily Shortslef
ENG 142-001: Global Shakespeare MWF 12:00-12:50pm
(satisfies UK Core: Global Dynamics)

This course will introduce students to Shakespeare as a global writer whose plays have been performed around the world in different languages and in different media (dance, film, theatrical performance, poetry, and graphic novels). We’ll explore what makes these plays so amenable to adaptation, cultural translation, and creative reinterpretation across differences of language, culture, religion, and time. We’ll also consider how these reworkings of Shakespeare transform the plays, giving them new meanings and providing audiences with innovative and exciting ways in which to engage them. Plays will include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet, and The Tempest. There are no prerequisites, and no knowledge of foreign languages is required.
 

Instructor: DaMaris Hill
ENG 168/AAS 168-001: Jazz and Democracy: Intellectual Inquiry MW 4-5:15pm
(satisfies UK Core: Citizenship)

Jazz has been a source of inspiration not just for artists but for a variety of twentieth-century literatures and theoretical practices.  This is a cultural studies / creative composition seminar that explores jazz as a philosophical and artistic practice rooted in American democracy.  We will explore jazz aesthetics as a literary, visual, and musical art form. We will also examine theories of jazz composition as philosophical statements that are in direct conversation with the principles of US democracy.  We will discuss the philosophical and aesthetic relationships that connect jazz literature to surrealist and existentialist artistic movements in modern and postmodern cultural contexts. The readings will be selections of fiction, poetry, drama, and essays with emphasis on jazz literary modes, creative trends, and political connotations specific to African American literature and culture.  Artists include James Baldwin, Harryette Mullen, and others.


Instructor: Holly Osborn
ENG 191-001: Literature and the Arts of Citizenship TR 11am-12:15pm
(satisfies UK Core: Citizenship)

This introductory course explores key aspects of citizenship – rights and responsibilities, belonging and exclusion, allegiance and protest – through a study of contemporary literature and film.  The stories depicted in creative texts reveal and examine complexities of lived cultural experience.  We’ll explore these complexities through weekly discussion, a few reflective blog posts, and a collaborative project in which small groups of students examine a chosen cultural topic of current interest through a collected montage of creative and academic sources. A midterm exam and a final exam over course content are also required. 

Broad units of discussion include:  9/11 and its literary representation; participation and protest through images and music; technology- and consumer-driven social consciousness; and the pursuit of rights and complexities of liberty inherent in the experiences of marginalized or excluded persons.  Each unit of discussion will explore a contemporary literary work and/or a thematic film representation.


Instructor: Cheryl Cardiff
ENG 207-001: Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction TR 9:30-10:45am

DEAR AUTHOR: THIS COURSE INTRODUCES YOU to the forms and practices of creative writing. Focusing on each individual, our workshop will develop the skill in writing stories and/or personal narratives. To help foster your work, weekly exercises will help you develop an understanding of the elements of the craft such as character development, narrative structure, dialogic engagement, and scene development. You also will be expected to read peer work with care and to discuss this writing with constructive, informed, and articulate criticism to specific elements of the text that go beyond simple like and dislike. The study of works by writers such as Annie Proulx, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Wallace Stegner in the context of craft—as opposed to literary interpretation or historical analysis—is a critical part of your artistic discipline and creative output. The main feature of the course is (of course) THE WORKSHOP itself, and you will have the opportunity to provide stories for peer evaluation three times over the course of the semester. Vital to writing is re-writing, of returning to your work and sculpting it into the shape you wish it to take. For your efforts, you will have the opportunity to further develop one workshopped piece for a second round of peer and instructor critique. As you practice becoming an effective and careful reader of both peer and established writing, you do become an effective and careful reader of your own. Writing, reading, and evaluating peer work all further your own creative practice. By the end of the term, you will feature your two workshopped stories and your choice of three shorter “best effort” writing exercises in a portfolio that you can be proud of, and one day, pass on to future progeny and fans.


Instructor: Gurney Norman
ENG 207-002: Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction T 5-7:30pm

English 207 Fiction is an introductory creative writing class designed to offer the student a laboratory situation in which she or he may develop fiction writing and reading skills. Class members provide a sympathetic audience for each student’s work-in-progress. During the semester students are asked to write three original short stories (or chapters or personal narratives) to be turned in at the beginning of each month for detailed critique by the professor. At least once during the semester each student will be invited (but not required) to present a story to the class for peer critique. Between the major writing assignments, students will be asked to perform weekly in-class and out-of-class writing exercises designed to give the student practice with various story elements and techniques such as dialogue, description, characterization, plot, and point of view. Counting the exercises, typically a student will produce 30-40 or more pages of original work during a semester. At semester’s end the student’s polished stories, samples of the writing exercises as well as written commentaries on some of the assigned readings are to be submitted as a portfolio to the professor.


Instructor: Catherine Brereton
ENG 207-003: Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: NonFiction MWF 11-11:50am
&
ENG 207-004: Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: NonFiction MWF 12-12:50pm

“What all such writing has in common is faithfulness to some reality that the writer did not invent—to a shared history, to real people, to actual events, to places one can visit, to facts one can check.”
 -Scott Russell Sanders, Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction

We love stories. We particularly love stories that we know to be true. We devour autobiographies and memoirs, feeling intimately attached to the writer. Recall, too, that moment when, at the beginning of a movie, the words “Based upon a true story” flash up on the screen. What happens next becomes more interesting because we know this to be based in part, if not entirely, upon someone’s lived experience. What connects us to these stories, arguably more firmly than we can connect to fiction, is the sense that our story, too, might one day be worthy of the telling. Such telling has become the genre we know as creative nonfiction. Encompassing everything from lyrical to journalistic, creative nonfiction has an immensity of scope and technique. Almost any audience can be catered for; almost anything goes.

In this class, we will learn the craft of creative nonfiction: how to read it, and, crucially, how to write it. Expect to read a great deal, for it is in the reading that we learn how to write. Expect, also, to write a great deal. Class texts may include Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Chronology of Water, Ed McClanahan’s I Just Hitched in from the Coast, Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird, Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones, and The Best American Essays, 2015 collection.  We’ll also spend time examining some of the nonfiction works now considered to be canonical—Jo Ann Beard’s “The Fourth State of Matter” and Charles Bowden’s “Torch Song” to name just two. The creative possibilities in nonfiction are vast; we’ll work on everything from lyric essays, and memoir, to flash nonfiction.

You’ll read, digest, and discuss our chosen texts, and then you’ll write, revise and workshop your own narratives. You’ll be expected to participate in lively discussions, sometimes on controversial or difficult subjects (nonfiction is not for the faint hearted), and you’ll be required to read aloud from your own work. We’ll work hard, but we’ll have fun too; between us we’ll create a tight community of writers. By the end of the semester, you can expect to have produced a substantial portfolio of work demonstrating your range as a nonfiction writer.


Instructor: Hannah Pittard
ENG 207-401: Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction R 6-8:30pm

And Chekov said, “Write a story, do, about a young man, the son of a serf, a former grocery boy, a choir singer, a high school pupil and university student, brought up to respect rank, to kiss the hands of priests, to truckle to the ideas of others—a young man who expressed thanks for every piece of bread, who was whipped many times, who went without galoshes to do his tutoring, who used his fists, tortured animals, was fond of dining with rich relatives, was a hypocrite in his dealings with God and men, needlessly, solely out of a realization of his own insignificance—write how this young man squeezes the slave out of himself, drop by drop, and how, on awaking one fine morning, he feels that the blood coursing through his veins is no longer that of a slave but that of a real human being.” It might take us fifteen weeks to get there, but we’ll be aiming high every minute of it…

This course is an introduction to the fiction workshop. As such, its purpose is two-fold: to further familiarize you, as readers, with some of the best examples of contemporary fiction available, and to give you a chance, as writers, to dip your pens in the ink and further try out this genre for yourself. 

Over the quarter you’ll write fiction; read published pieces; critique your classmates’ original writing; and have your own writing reviewed by your classmates. You’ll leave this course with an appreciation for the rewards and challenges of fiction writing, exposure to a few new writers to read and admire, and a portfolio of original writing of your own.


Instructor: Drew Heverin
ENG 230-001: Literature and Medicine: The Ailing Body, Medical Theory, and an Introduction to Literature TR 12:30-1:45pm
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Humanities)

This section of ENG 230 focuses on the intersection between what we know about disease and how we talk about its impact on our lives. For much of our cultural history, a division has separated the science of medicine and the art of literature, but these fields are not as different as supposed. The literature that we will read in this course will investigate this borderland where medicine and art meet.  We will look into how literature has grappled with questions of illness, how medical theories throughout history have contributed to the stories we tell about disease, and how authors have attempted to understand their bodily selves, whether infected by or immune from what plagued the society at large. The texts in this course will cover a wide range of genres and time periods, stretching from the writings of Hippocrates to the novels of Michael Crichton and Joshua Ferris. Throughout the semester, we will develop close reading and literary analysis skills through in class discussion and course assignments.

Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement.
Provides ENG minor credit.


Instructor: Michael Genovese
ENG 230-002: Introduction to Literature:
Tales of Villainy TR 9:30-10:45am
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Humanities)

How often have you been reading a book and the bad guy seems so much more appealing than the forces of good?  Or how often have you wondered whether the villain in the book is really so guilty of wrongdoing?  Is the "good guy" really so clearly beyond reproach? In this course we will explore plays, novels, short stories, and poems in which villains clearly emerge, but our goal will be to look beyond good and evil.  What is the nature of the villainy?  What is its significance?  Does the bad character represent something bigger than himself, or is he an anomaly? 

Is evil always some version of the same thing, or does it work differently depending on the context?  How does the literature contain the threat he or she poses, and are you buying it?  Readings will be drawn from British and American sources from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. The class will feature a few papers as well as a midterm and final exam.

Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement.
Provides ENG minor credit.



Instructor: Richard Parmer
ENG 230-003: Introduction to Literature: Literature and Justice MWF 12-12:50pm
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Humanities)

This course will introduce students to the discipline of literary studies through the reading of a variety of literary genres, important disciplinary vocabulary, and analytical models that are often used for literary criticism. We will explore the value of complexity in literature through close, active reading and consider how information such as cultural context can affect such readings. To achieve these goals, we will contemplate how issues of justice and injustice pervade our culture, the ways justice is conceptualized in complicated, contested definitions of “the good” and “the right,” and how justice has both universal and localized criteria. As a result, we will complicate dichotomies such as just and unjust, hero and criminal. How do our understandings of justice change when we consider familial obligations, spiritual allegiances, environmental issues, social class, geographic region, or patriotism? Under what circumstances might someone be classified as a terrorist AND a hero? To what extent do literary artifacts reflect social dialogues about justice, and how does critical engagement with such artifacts contribute to those discussions? What do digital engagements with literature add to the dialogue? Join us as we consider these questions and others.

Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement.
Provides ENG minor credit.


Instructor: Lisa Zunshine
ENG 230-004: Introduction to Literature: Foundling Narrative from Pastoral to Parody MW 4-5:15pm
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Humanities)

What do Luke Skywalker, Hercules, Moses, Oedipus, and Superman have in common? They are all fictional “foundlings”—brought up by people other than their parents and discovering that their fate (glorious or ignominious) is bound up with their true heritage. This section of English 230 will introduce students to literary analysis by following the development of the “foundling narrative” in fiction, from Longus’s Daphnis and Chloe and Daniel Defoe’s Moll Flanders to Jane Austen’s Emma and Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest. (We'll watch some movies, too!)

Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement.
Provides ENG minor credit.


Instructor: TBD
ENG 230-005: Introduction to Literature MWF 10-10:50am


Instructor: Richard Parmer
ENG 230-006: Introduction to Literature: Literature and Justice MWF 11-11:50
This course will introduce students to the discipline of literary studies through the reading of a variety of literary genres, important disciplinary vocabulary, and analytical models that are often used for literary criticism. We will explore the value of complexity in literature through close, active reading and consider how information such as cultural context can affect such readings. To achieve these goals, we will contemplate how issues of justice and injustice pervade our culture, the ways justice is conceptualized in complicated, contested definitions of “the good” and “the right,” and how justice has both universal and localized criteria. As a result, we will complicate dichotomies such as just and unjust, hero and criminal. How do our understandings of justice change when we consider familial obligations, spiritual allegiances, environmental issues, social class, geographic region, or patriotism? Under what circumstances might someone be classified as a terrorist AND a hero? To what extent do literary artifacts reflect social dialogues about justice, and how does critical engagement with such artifacts contribute to those discussions? What do digital engagements with literature add to the dialogue? Join us as we consider these questions and others

Instructor: Drew Heverin
ENG 230-007: Introduction to Literature: Sympathy for the Devil TR 3:30-4:45pm
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Humanities)

This course will introduce students to the discipline of literary studies through the reading of a variety of literary genres, important disciplinary vocabulary, and analytical models that are often used for literary criticism. We will explore the value of complexity in literature through close, active reading and consider how information such as cultural context can affect such readings. To achieve these goals, we will contemplate how issues of justice and injustice pervade our culture, the ways justice is conceptualized in complicated, contested definitions of “the good” and “the right,” and how justice has both universal and localized criteria. As a result, we will complicate dichotomies such as just and unjust, hero and criminal. How do our understandings of justice change when we consider familial obligations, spiritual allegiances, environmental issues, social class, geographic region, or patriotism? Under what circumstances might someone be classified as a terrorist AND a hero? To what extent do literary artifacts reflect social dialogues about justice, and how does critical engagement with such artifacts contribute to those discussions? What do digital engagements with literature add to the dialogue? Join us as we consider these questions and others.

Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement.
Provides ENG minor credit.


Instructor: Patrick Herald
ENG 230-008: The Self in Literature  TR 11-12:15pm

(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Humanities)
This section of ENG 230 will focus on those stories that oblige us to sympathize with “evil” characters and understand what motivates and influences their malevolent acts. For much of our history, we have attempted to understand the nature of evil, or what makes people violate the social contract and commit violent acts, but literature offers us a unique perspective on this issue. Through the power of fiction, great works of literature allow us to enter the minds of mischievous individuals, exploring just what could turn one away from the social norms that allow society to prosper.  In this course, we will look into how authors explore the nature of evil, how the culture at large influences our depiction of evil, and how literature redefines humanity by examining the potential for evil present in each individual. The texts in this course will include a wide range of genres and time periods, from Shakespeare’s Macbeth and “The Story of the Three Little Pigs” to Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl. Throughout the semester, we will develop close reading and literary analysis skills through in-class discussion and course assignments. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities.

Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement.
Provides ENG minor credit.


Instructor: Patrick Herald
ENG 230-009: Introduction to Literature: The Self in Literature TR 2-3:15pm

This section of ENG 230 will focus on those stories that oblige us to sympathize with “evil” characters and understand what motivates and influences their malevolent acts. For much of our history, we have attempted to understand the nature of evil, or what makes people violate the social contract and commit violent acts, but literature offers us a unique perspective on this issue. Through the power of fiction, great works of literature allow us to enter the minds of mischievous individuals, exploring just what could turn one away from the social norms that allow society to prosper.  In this course, we will look into how authors explore the nature of evil, how the culture at large influences our depiction of evil, and how literature redefines humanity by examining the potential for evil present in each individual. The texts in this course will include a wide range of genres and time periods, from Shakespeare’s Macbeth and “The Story of the Three Little Pigs” to Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl. Throughout the semester, we will develop close reading and literary analysis skills through in-class discussion and course assignments. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities.


Instructor: Jill Rappoport-Genovese
ENG 242-001: Survey of British Literature II MW 12-12:50pm F 12-12:50pm
&
ENG 242-002: Survey of British Literature II MW 12-12:50pm F 11-11:50am

In this course, we will explore English literary history from the English Restoration to the mid twentieth century, focusing on how fiction and poetry respond to and help shape culture and society. Looking closely at exemplary works by such authors as Defoe, Austen, Blake, Dickens, Tennyson, and Woolf, we will consider the changes and continuities between a broad range of important Enlightenment, Romantic, Victorian, and Modern literary texts. Requirements include active participation in discussion sections, response papers, and written exams.


Instructor: Alan Nadel
ENG 252-001: Survey of American Literature II MWF 4-5:15pm

This course will look at the major works of American fiction and poetry published between the end of the Civil War and World War II. We will study how they reflect changing literary and cultural trends, including Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, Expressionism, and Imagism. We will attend to an author’s characteristic stylistic and thematic traits, especially in regard to the ways in which they reflect their historical moment. The writers whose work we will consider include Whitman, Frost, Eliot, W.C. Williams, Twain, Wharton, James, Fitzgerald, Hurston, Crane, and Faulkner. There will be three take-home exams, several short quizzes, and a final.


Instructor: Matthew Godbey
ENG 260/AAS 264-001: Introduction to Black Writers TR 12:30-1:45pm
&
ENG 260/AAS 264-002: Introduction to Black Writers TR 2-3:15pm
(satisfies GWR)

This course explores the work of black writers during the past four decades. We will use works of fiction and nonfiction written since 1975 to examine how authors use literature to explore both contemporary issues related to race and identity and the lingering effects of historical issues such as slavery, Jim Crow, the great migration, and civil rights. Over the course of the semester we will look at this body of literature both as a literary tradition in its own right and as a lens through which we can better see contemporary African American and American culture as a whole.

Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. At the same time, as an introduction to literary studies, we will focus on the skills of literary analysis with a special emphasis on close reading and historical context, making original, well-crafted arguments about texts in essay form, using research to support your analyses, and mastering many of the fundamental elements of literary study.


Instructor: Nazera Wright
ENG 265-001: Survey of African-American Literature I MWF 11-11:50am

In this course, the first of a two-part sequence offered on African American literary history and cultural studies, we will examine the works of foundational writers, thinkers and activists of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. We will read a range of genres, from poetry, novels, autobiographies, manifestos and speeches, to articles from early black newspapers, magazines, and conduct manuals. For each text, students will assess the venue of publication, consider thematic scope, and interrogate political and ideological aims. Among the topics that we will discuss are Black Nationalism, citizenship, gender, race, feminism, masculinity, and the emergence of the New Negro. We will explore important critical and theoretical essays that evaluate the concerns of the literary texts, and we will examine major themes, traditions, conventions, and tropes in early African American literature. Course requirements include engaged and thoughtful class participation, a presentation, a midterm paper (5 pages) and a final paper (8-10 pages).

Required Texts

Phillis Wheatley, Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (1773)
David Walker, David Walker’s Appeal (1829)
Harriet Wilson, Our Nig (1859)
Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861)
Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition (1901)
W. E. B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (1903)
Nella Larsen, Quicksand, (1928)
Steven McQueen, 12 Years a Slave (2013) (Film)


Instructor: Walter Foreman
ENG 280-001: Introduction to Film MWF 10-10:50am
(satisfies GWR)

This section of ENG 280 is an introduction to the study of the movies as a narrative art and a cultural document, with emphasis on the former.  The movies we will watch will be chosen from a variety of genres, national cinemas, and time periods.  The course will develop students' skills in interpretation and analysis of film and in evaluating competing interpretations of films.  The "evaluation" of movies we will do will not be about assigning stars or pointing thumbs up or down, nor will the evaluation of interpretations necessarily be designed to accept one and reject its competitors.  All the movies for this section will be about—though not at all exclusively about—monsters.  What makes something a "monster"?  How are monsters made?  Who makes monsters?  What is the relation between "monster" and "point of view"?  "Monsters" are a thread, a common theme we will follow through the course, though we will by no means treat each movie as simply a "monster movie."  We are not tracing a genre: only two or at most three of our movies would be likely to show up in a list of either "monster" or "horror" movies.  We will visit many other genres: westerns, private eye movies, comedies (silent and screwball), science fiction, psychological thrillers, musicals, and more.  Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. 

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Hannah Ruehl
ENG 280-002: Introduction to Film: TR 9:30-10:45am
(satisfies GWR)

Grendel’s Mother. Medea. Medusa. Cruella Deville. Maleficent. What makes a monster? How does gender play into our understanding of monstrous? This section of 280 is built around the depictions of females as monster/rous in film. Toward this goal, we will be watching films that depict different versions of women in forms of deviance or abnormalities in body, emotion, or mind. We will do this through a historical cultural context.

ENG 280 is an introductory film course that introduces students to the basics of film, active viewing, interpretation, and argument. We will learn the film terminology and techniques and use these skills to interpret and analyze. We will look at films and critical readings as tools toward these goals.

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Guy Spriggs
ENG 280-003: Introduction to Film TR 2-3:15pm
(satisfies GWR)

English 280 offers an introduction to the study of movies as a narrative art and a cultural artifact, giving students the tools to identify cinematic techniques (such as mise-en-scene, editing, and cinematography) and engage with them to develop critical interpretations of film. This section in particular examines the use of ambiguity in cinema in a variety of historical and national contexts. Many films use narrative and form to deliver unclear messages about meaning or theme. How does the uncertainty of such films as Pan’s Labyrinth, The Thing, and Inception affect our ability to interpret their cultural and artistic value? By engaging with cinematic ambiguity, we will develop our skills for critically reading films and understanding the arguments they make.

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Armando Prats
ENG 280-004: Introduction to Film TR 3:30-4:45pm

(satisfies GWR)
I know that you don’t need to be “introduced” to film—not the way that you might need to be introduced to Chaucer or Milton, or to Melville or Faulkner or Joyce or to literature in general—but this version of ENG 280 will introduce you to the study of the movies, that is, to their history, their methods, their thematic, artistic, and cultural possibilities. Early in the semester we will study silent movies, and will let the genius of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton guide us. We will then shift to early “talkies,” both American (Citizen Kane and The Maltese Falcon) and foreign (Rashomon and Yojimbo, The Seventh Seal and Nights of Cabiria). Thereafter we will study a genre (the Western) by perhaps its greatest director, John Ford, and starring its greatest hero (that would be John Wayne): Stagecoach, Fort Apache, The Searchers, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance. For the final weeks of the semester I’d like to consider your own suggestions—not so much in the spirit of indulgence (or of pandering) but to show you that the movies that you know best can still admit of inclusion in the academic study of film.

Assignments: quizzes every week, two short papers, a midterm and a final (both multiple-choice and essay). Attendance required and enforced.

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Randall Roorda
ENG 280-005: Introduction to Film: TR 2-3:15pm
(satisfies GWR)

This introduction to film features movies from their inception to nearly the present day. It will stress how cinema has developed as a set of conventions, a language of sorts, especially in the apotheosis of classical Hollywood style (and in the efforts of those who swat at the flanks of this beast). You'll watch a movie a week, write responses to what you watch, take some quizzes, and write a couple short papers. Don't take this class if you can't stand black-and-white! (Free prize to anyone who mentions having read this description.)

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Eric Casero
ENG 280-006: Introduction to Film: Stranger than Truth M 5-7:30pm
&
ENG 280-007: Introduction to Film: Stranger than Truth T 5-7:30pm
(satisfies GWR)

This section of Introduction to Film focuses on films that explore the fine line between truth and fiction—films where fiction becomes reality, and vice versa. We will view films that show fictional characters coming to life, real people finding out that they live in fictional worlds, and stories becoming reality. These films raise questions about the nature of truth, the purpose of art, and the role that fantasy plays in human lives. Films will span a wide range of time periods, from classics such as Vertigo to recent films such as last year’s Best Picture Oscar winner, Birdman. We will also explore a range of genres, including horror (The Babadook) and comedy (Tropic Thunder). Students will complete two papers, a formal presentation, and a midterm exam, along with weekly assignments and quizzes.

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Andrew Beutel
ENG 280-008: Introduction to Film MWF 9-9:50am
(satisfies GWR)

“No visionary cinematic genius could hope to recreate the majestic abjection of that double surrender,” wrote the English novelist Martin Amis regarding the collapse of the Twin Towers. These words do more than describe an historical event; they attempt to interpret the meaning of it. Despite Amis’s challenge, however, film has also attempted to interpret and, indeed, recreate what happened on September 11, 2001. This attempt, always made with controversy, has entailed confronting the many troubling questions 9/11 raised in its wake. For example: what does it mean? how did it happen? and why? In this section of English 280, we will explore the different ways in which films reckon with the overwhelming reality of 9/11 and interrogate the answers they give to these questions. We will cover a number of critical issues, ranging from the psychological (death, loss, and catastrophe) to the political (national identity, terrorism, and the War on Terror). In addition, we will learn how to “read” film by studying its formal elements (mise-en-scène, cinematography, sound, editing, film genres, and narrative structure) and developing a theoretical vocabulary with which to interpret it. Films will include 11’09”0, United 93, Fahrenheit 9/11, and Babel, among others.

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Kyle Eveleth
ENG 280-009: Introduction to Film: Heroes & Villains MWF 10-10:50am
(satisfies GWR)

What exactly makes a hero heroic?  A villain villainous?  And how does one visually depict that to an audience of millions, across time and culture, so it’s clear and obvious who deserves their cheers and who their boos?  And what do those qualities labeled heroic/villainous suggest about a culture as a whole?  This course, in addition to serving as an introduction to the critical study of film, will analyze representations along the spectrum from heroic to villainous.  We will discuss not only “classic Hollywood style” and the blockbuster, but also independent films, avant-garde films, documentaries, and even animation, querying across genres, cultures, and time periods. Students can expect short quizzes, two essays totaling fifteen pages, and a final exam.

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Andrew Beutel
ENG 280-010: Introduction to Film MWF 11-11:50am
(satisfies GWR)

“No visionary cinematic genius could hope to recreate the majestic abjection of that double surrender,” wrote the English novelist Martin Amis regarding the collapse of the Twin Towers. These words do more than describe an historical event; they attempt to interpret the meaning of it. Despite Amis’s challenge, however, film has also attempted to interpret and, indeed, recreate what happened on September 11, 2001. This attempt, always made with controversy, has entailed confronting the many troubling questions 9/11 raised in its wake. For example: what does it mean? how did it happen? and why? In this section of English 280, we will explore the different ways in which films reckon with the overwhelming reality of 9/11 and interrogate the answers they give to these questions. We will cover a number of critical issues, ranging from the psychological (death, loss, and catastrophe) to the political (national identity, terrorism, and the War on Terror). In addition, we will learn how to “read” film by studying its formal elements (mise-en-scène, cinematography, sound, editing, film genres, and narrative structure) and developing a theoretical vocabulary with which to interpret it. Films will include 11’09”0, United 93, Fahrenheit 9/11, and Babel, among others.

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Kyle Eveleth
ENG 280-011: Introduction to Film: Heroes & Villains MWF 12-12:50pm
(satisfies GWR)

What exactly makes a hero heroic?  A villain villainous?  And how does one visually depict that to an audience of millions, across time and culture, so it’s clear and obvious who deserves their cheers and who their boos?  And what do those qualities labeled heroic/villainous suggest about a culture as a whole?  This course, in addition to serving as an introduction to the critical study of film, will analyze representations along the spectrum from heroic to villainous.  We will discuss not only “classic Hollywood style” and the blockbuster, but also independent films, avant-garde films, documentaries, and even animation, querying across genres, cultures, and time periods. Students can expect short quizzes, two essays totaling fifteen pages, and a final exam.

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Hannah Ruehl
ENG 280-012: Introduction to Film: TR 11am-12:15pm
(satisfies GWR)

Grendel’s Mother. Medea. Medusa. Cruella Deville. Maleficent. What makes a monster? How does gender play into our understanding of monstrous? This section of 280 is built around the depictions of females as monster/rous in film. Toward this goal, we will be watching films that depict different versions of women in forms of deviance or abnormalities in body, emotion, or mind. We will do this through a historical cultural context.

ENG 280 is an introductory film course that introduces students to the basics of film, active viewing, interpretation, and argument. We will learn the film terminology and techniques and use these skills to interpret and analyze. We will look at films and critical readings as tools toward these goals.

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Guy Spriggs
ENG 280-013: Introduction to Film: TR 12:30-1:45pm
(satisfies GWR)

English 280 offers an introduction to the study of movies as a narrative art and a cultural artifact, giving students the tools to identify cinematic techniques (such as mise-en-scene, editing, and cinematography) and engage with them to develop critical interpretations of film. This section in particular examines the use of ambiguity in cinema in a variety of historical and national contexts. Many films use narrative and form to deliver unclear messages about meaning or theme. How does the uncertainty of such films as Pan’s Labyrinth, The Thing, and Inception affect our ability to interpret their cultural and artistic value? By engaging with cinematic ambiguity, we will develop our skills for critically reading films and understanding the arguments they make.

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Cheryl Cardiff
ENG 280-014: Introduction to Film: Difference and "Other" Constructions in Films TR 12:30-1:45pm
(satisfies GWR)

This is an introductory film course that aims to provide students the basics of analyzing films and writing about films. As the most popular medium of entertainment, films offer an interested public constructed worlds, populated with characters and the narratives about them. The films proposing such stories, ideas, and visual concepts of characters representing marginalized communities are what is at stake for this course. We will involve ourselves with the project of investigating themes related to filmic constructions of difference (in terms of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, deviance, etc.). As we concentrate on these primary texts, we’ll look to secondary and background literature to help bring some more perspective on them. Sample works: The Immigrant; Night of the Living Dead; Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle; Flower Drum Song; Blonde Venus; That Touch of Mink; Death in Venice.

Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.


Instructor: Dan Howell
ENG 285-001: History of Film II MWF 11-11:50am

Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course will look in a wide-ranging way at postwar cinema, including Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, American movies of the 1950s, 60s and (especially) the 70s and later, plus other film achievements around the world.  We will pay especially close attention to formal elements such as mise-en-scène, cinematography, sound, and editing, as well as narrative structures and genres, with some attention being paid to historical (social, cultural) contexts.  Expect some black-and-white films and some films with subtitles -- but all films will be truly exceptional. 

Lecture format.   Midterm and Final exams, and a few short written responses.  Viewing films outside of class is required. Does not fulfill Historical Survey requirement.

Can be taken for ENG Major Elective requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.


Instructor: Janet Eldred
ENG 290-001: Introduction to Women’s Literature MW 1-1:50pm + online component
(satisfies GWR)

Love, intimacy, violence, family, illness, and all manner of mayhem.  This introduction to literature by women focuses on women who “lived to tell the tale”--and changed the scripts we read and see.  Expect to read poetry and short novels and to watch films.


Instructor: Marion Rust
ENG 290-002: Introduction to Women’s Literature: Gender & Autobiography MWF 10-10:50am
(satisfies GWR)

Is there such a thing as “women’s autobiography”?  Does the gender identification of an author define the work (s)he writes? We will address this question through a variety of critically acclaimed recent texts: rapper-poet-playwright Kate Tempest’s Hold Your Own; prematurely deceased Ivy League graduate Marina Keegan’s The Opposite of Loneliness; MacArthur “genius” grant award-winner and graphic novelist Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home; Iranian graphic novelist and filmmaker Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis; Piper Kerman’s prison memoir, Orange is the New Black; Misty Copeland’s Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina; Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s My Beloved World; and ‘70s rocker Patti Smith’s Just Kids. One thing that unites all the narratives in this class is that each writer was inspired to publish in order to confront, reveal and come to terms with unexpected hardship.


Instructor: Rynetta Davis
ENG 330-001: Text and Context: Chestnutt’s Marrow TR 9:30-10:45am

(satisfies GCCR for English majors)
This course will examine one of the most important texts in African American literary history, Charles Chesnutt’s The Marrow of Tradition (1901).  We will consider why Chesnutt chose to write a fictional account of the 1898 Wilmington Race Massacre.  As well, we will study the historical, cultural, political, and literary contexts in which this novel appeared.  How did Chesnutt’s literary peers, specifically William Dean Howells, receive the novel?  How many copies of the novel were sold in 1901?  Who was Chesnutt’s “target” audience? 

Chesnutt’s fictions address a variety of themes including racial passing, “illicit” interracial sex and marriage, and interracial violence; his literary texts interrogate what W.E.B. Du Bois dubbed the “problem” of the twentieth-century (and beyond): the color line. We will pursue a similar line of inquiry in our assessment of Chesnutt’s literary oeuvre by analyzing how his fictions dramatized social crises such as segregation and racial discrimination. Moreover, we will examine how Chesnutt’s contemporaries, William Dean Howells, Mark Twain, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, and Pauline Hopkins, among others, responded to his representation of race relations in the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-centuries.


Instructor: Janet Eldred
ENG 330-002: Text and Context: Breakfast at Tiffany’s MW 12-12:50pm + online component
(satisfies GCCR for English majors)

So you’ve likely heard of the classic film Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  Maybe you remember Audrey Hepburn’s iconic little black dress and sunglasses, or perhaps it’s the long cigarette holder and the elegant strand of pearls that caught your attention.  Possibly, it’s just that tomcat.  Yes, we’ll study the film, but we’ll also read the novella by Truman Capote and consider the work in the context of his career and the literary and cultural happenings of the time.


Instructor: Joyce MacDonald
ENG 330-003: Text and Context: Cleopatra: Shakespeare TR 11am-12:15pm
(satisfies GCCR for English majors)

This section of Text and Context, “Cleopatra and Her Afterlife,” begins with Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra. Along with Shakespeare’s play, we will also look at a variety of other sixteenth and seventeenth century works about her, both dramatic and non-dramatic, in order to see how central she is to the ways in which the period imagined history, empire, race, and femininity. The course will conclude with several looks at Cleopatra in Hollywood, as we see her in films directed by Gordon Edwards, Cecil B. DeMille, Joseph Mankiewicz and F. Gary Gray. How have these modern views of Cleopatra changed the Renaissance view of her allure and her significance? What does the figure of Cleopatra—queen, goddess, independent woman—mean in the modern world?


Instructor: Armando Prats
ENG 330-004: Text and Context: Moby Dick TR 2-3:15pm
(satisfies GCCR for English majors)

Just because. Because somebody has to . . . to read It, to glory in It (and not seldom to curse It), to learn not just about It but from It; to try to understand It, to honor It. Because It is the greatest fish story ever told (how many times do you think It’s been called a whale of a story?). Because It’s a “text” that provides its own “context”—book and whale, book and universe, book and life, life as book, living as reading, reading life. Because Matilda read it at a tender age and recommends it; and because Homer Simpson didn’t read it and doesn’t know what he’s talking about. Because you know you shouldn’t graduate without having read It: It will round out your education, viz., It’s respectable, good cocktail-party conversation, impeccable source of bragging rights, a sure way to impress parents, boyfriends and girlfriends, small children, and even pets (who might, after all, root for the whale)—and, yes, prospective employers. Because It’s there—Himalayan, massive, magnificent and sublime, impenetrable, unconquered, forever beckoning, slippery, fishy even. Because It is your American King Lear and your Tempest, (and might therefore just make Ishmael kin to Hamlet, what with the “hypos” and all). Because It will transport your spirit, will haunt your sleep, will improve your daydreams, will change your life—and, just perhaps, because It will give to you—magnanimously yet humbly—the Beauty, the Truth, and the Goodness for which you may have forgotten to ask. (Required: curiosity, delight in reading, attendance, student-led discussions, quizzes, several short papers and one multi-modal presentation. Not easy but rewarding.)


Instructor: Jill Rappoport-Genovese
ENG 330-005: Text and Context: Victorian London MWF 10-10:50am
(satisfies GCCR for English majors)

For the 19th-century authors this course examines, London was a place of contradictions. Center of a wealthy and expanding empire, it was also a site of filth, poverty, and crime. The city offered opportunity but also danger to its visitors and inhabitants; it was a showcase of both civic reform and social scandal. Despite tremendous growth in population, the urban experience was frequently one of isolation and alienation.

In this course, we will explore the possibilities that Victorian London provided for the literary imagination. How did urban space shape, conceal, or reveal character? How did the different perspectives of tourist, detective, reformer, prostitute, or child help to construct popular ideas about London? What literary genres emerged out of the changing conditions of the city? We will read poetry, fiction, and essays by writers such as Dickens, D. G. Rossetti, Ruskin, Doyle, and Levy, mapping various literary and social projects within the rapidly changing spaces of an increasingly modern city. The course has two primary aims: to introduce you to a range of key nineteenth-century authors and literary forms through close, critical reading, and to provoke your thoughtful assessment of the relationships between these texts and their cultural contexts.


Instructor: Michael Carter
ENG 337-001: Literature and Genre: Native American Literature MWF 12-12:50pm

Whether through films, historical texts, stereotypes, or even sport team mascots, Native Americans have been viewed through the lens of European Americans. In this course, Native Americans will speak through their own mythologies, novels, short stories and poetry. Beginning with early myths and continuing up to the 21st century, this class will listen to these voices, see the Native Americans’ own literature, and begin to know better America’s first settlers. With a focus primarily on 20th century Native American writers: Leslie Silko, Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, James Welch, Sherman Alexie and many others, we will explore these distinct voices as they tell their stories. The course will include daily readings, research, essays, quizzes and exams.


Instructor: Matthew Godbey
ENG 337-002: Literature and Genre: Graphic Novel TR 9:30-10:45am

This course will introduce students to the Graphic Novel as an emerging genre in contemporary American literature. To do so, we will focus less on its history and more on its form, reading a variety of contemporary graphic novels that represent the breadth and diversity of the output over the past 25-30 years. Students can expect to read such works as Art Spiegelman’s Maus I and II, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, Charles Burns’ Black Hole, selections from Chris Ware, etc.

Students will explore the aesthetics of sequential narrative and consider the graphic novel’s place in contemporary literary and popular culture. Among the questions we will be asking are: What is the grammar of comics and how does its mode of simultaneous seeing and reading complicate conventional approaches to reading literature? Can graphic novels become literature? As well, we will examine these graphic novels in the broader context of American literature and culture, with an eye toward continuing to develop and improve the core skills of literary analysis, critical thinking, and argumentative writing.


Instructor: Michael Trask
ENG 337-003: Literature and Genre: Sci-fi & End of the World TR 3:30-4:45pm

Apocalypses are hot these days.  The end of the world seems to be a narrative that television and film audiences as well as readers of fiction high and low cannot get enough of.   Apocalypses essentially fall into two categories: human-made and providential (including divinely or extraterrestrially ordained).  These categories of course often blur (human-made solutions, usually biological, lead to accidental catastrophe).  This class will look at a variety of novels that take up apocalypse and related themes—dystopia, say— in contemporary culture.  Starting with Richard Matheson’s I am Legend, we’ll look first at why apocalypse has been a prevalent concern in science fiction as a genre and then proceed to recent novels (and perhaps a film or two) that preoccupy themselves with life at or after the end of the world.  How does society look after the collapse of civilization? Is there a society to speak of?  Why are novelists (both genre writers and “literary” figures) drawn to the apocalypse?  We’ll pursue these questions and many others.  Texts to be read include Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake, Colson Whitehead, Zone One, Cormac McCarthy, The Road, Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven, Max Brooks, World War Z, Hugh Howey, Wool, Alden Bell, The Reapers are the Angels,  Nicole Kornher-Stace, Archivist Wasp, Tom Perrotta, The Leftovers.  Assignments will include two brief (5pg) papers, a take-home midterm, and a take-home final exam.


Instructor: Helen Oyeyemi
ENG 338/A&S 500-401: WRITING CRAFT: Maps & Trapdoors T 6-8:30pm

Doesn’t it seem as if there were only ever a handful of tales to begin with, and all the ones you felt like telling have already been told? You may even be tempted to just stay in bed forever with a stack of the very books that stole your future.

Here's an alternative: bring that narrative fluency of yours over here so we can consider the aspect of stories that will always prove surprising, entertaining and involving - the way the thing is told. We’ll be reading works that meet Italo Calvino’s requirements for good writing: lightness, swiftness, exactitude, multiplicity, and a mysterious and possibly indescribable fifth quality. Since I’ll be asking you to write fiction that responds to some of the pieces we read together, this will be a good series of evenings for anyone interested in clearing up some of the mystery around their own storytelling process. There may also be proper tea if I find appropriate teapots.


Instructor: Alan Nadel
ENG 339-401: Author Studies: Ralph Ellison MW 6-7:15pm

This course will look at the major work of one of the leading 20th-Century American authors. We will read his masterpiece novel, Invisible Man, a few early short stories, several of his essays, and his posthumous novel, Three days Before the Shooting, and some of the works that have been influential on Ellison’s writing. There will be several short quizzes, three take-home exams, and a final.


Instructor: Joyce MacDonald
ENG 343-001: Renaissance Drama and Society TR 9:30-10:45am

This course is designed to explore what Renaissance drama looks like without Shakespeare. Although many of us tend to see Shakespeare as the representative Renaissance playwright, he was only one member of a brilliant generation, and his work is often radically different in tone and structure from that of his contemporaries. This course will concentrate on the plays that everyone else was writing, in popular genres that Shakespeare either adapted so heavily that he essentially transformed their nature (e.g., revenge or domestic tragedy), or that he didn’t work in at all (such as city comedy). Recurring topics will include sex, romance and jealousy, social relations, national identity, urban life and the value of money, and racial and religious difference. By the end of the semester, students will understand the operations of varied dramatic types, recognize the styles and preoccupations of individual playwrights, and be able to provide an account of what their work contributed to the vitality and distinction of Renaissance drama.


Instructor: Ellen Rosenman
ENG 348-001: Victorian Novels and Their Worlds TR 11am-12:15pm

The Victorian era was a time of massive change – technological advances, economic instability, the rise of the factory system, urbanization, crises of gender and class, the consolidation of the British Empire – and Victorian novels were in the thick of it. In this class, we will explore the artistic and ideological challenges of representing, commenting on, and sometimes resisting these changes. On the one hand, literary realism promised to provide a lucid, thoughtful image of a world in flux; on the other modes such as melodrama and gothic seemed necessary to capture the disorientations of an unfamiliar, rapidly modernizing world. We’ll attend to the particular issues each novel raises, but a continuing concern will be the ways in which the immensely flexible form of the novel adapts itself to cultural, historical, and political contexts. We will read novels by the canonical greats, George Eliot and Charles Dickens, as well as a work of sensation fiction (a scandalous sub-genre featuring a lot of bad behavior by middle-class characters) and at least one novel from the end of the century, when both literary form and social roles were undergoing major renovations.

Expect to do a series of short assignments, an interpretive paper, and a more free-form project. No exams.

A word of advice: Victorian novels are long – there’s no getting around it. Some of us consider their length one of their most appealing features: you enter a rich, complex world on page one and don’t have to worry about being expelled from it any time soon. The reading for this class will be broken up into manageable chunks, so people living something resembling a normal life should be fine, but if you are taking 80,000 other credit hours, are running your own business 60 hours a week, are commuting from Switzerland, or don’t enjoy reading, you may fall behind. I don’t want to discourage anyone from taking the course, but I want you to know what to expect.  These novels do take time to read.


Instructor: Michael Trask
ENG 353-001: The American Novel in the 1920s TR 12:30-1:45pm

The 1920s is arguably the greatest decade in the history of the American novel.  Whereas the 1850s gave us The Scarlet Letter, Moby-Dick, and Uncle Tom’s Cabin, the decade after the Great War gave us Edith Wharton’s Age of Innocence (1920), Sinclair Lewis’s Babbitt (1922), Theodore Dreiser’s An American Tragedy (1925), John Dos Passos’s Manhattan Transfer (1925), F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925), Willa Cather’s The Professor’s House (1925), Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises (1926), Nella Larsen’s Passing (1929), and William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury (1929).  These monumental books, with perhaps a few not so major but still splendid novels yet to be determined, will form the core of our reading in this class.  As we make our way chronologically through the decade, we’ll be especially mindful of what makes for the difference between modernist fiction and realist fiction, how these categories overlap, what historical conditions created such an energetic cultural ferment for American fiction in the 1920s, and what the lasting legacy of the 1920s has been for the novel in our own time.  Assignments will include two short papers (5pg. each), a take-home midterm, and a take-home final exam.


Instructor: Andrew Ewell
ENG 357-001: Contemporary American Literature TR 3:30-4:45pm

This course seeks to identify some of the chief characteristics of American fiction published between about 1965 and the present, and to explore the various ways in which the novels and stories from that period represent, critique, and inform American ways of life, both lived and imagined.

We’ll begin by contrasting the postmodernist aesthetic of the late 1960’s (Barth, et al.) with that period’s countervailing impulse towards domestic and social realism (Updike, Roth). From there, we’ll track the legacy of these seemingly irreconcilable styles through Thomas Pynchon’s paranoid California wastelands, Ann Beattie’s jaundiced cocktail parties, Don DeLillo’s spiritually bankrupt supermarkets and megamalls, Denis Johnson’s VFWs and flop houses, and Junot Diaz’s and Jhumpa Lahiri’s multi-lingual living rooms, in order to develop some hypotheses about what exactly is “contemporary,” “American,” or even “literary” about contemporary American literature. Other authors may include Lorrie Moore, Alison Bechdel, Tim O’Brien, and Raymond Carver. Three essays. Some short writing assignments. No exams.


Instructor: Erik Reece
ENG 359-001: The Kentucky Literary Heritage TR 2-3:15pm

This course will introduce students to the rich history of our state’s literature. We will consider what makes that literature unique and what themes have proved dominant. Authors may include: James Still, William Wells Brown, Wendell Berry, Bobbie Ann Mason, Frank X Walker, Gurney Norman, Ed McClanahan, Mary Ann Taylor-Hall, Gayl Jones and Robert Gipe.


Instructor: Walter Foreman
ENG 384-001: Literature and Film:
Shakespeare & Film MWF 11:00-11:50   
An encounter with a variety of Shakespeare’s plays in both written and filmed forms.  We will begin with the poetic, dramatic, and theatrical values of Shakespeare’s texts and thus especially with Shakespearean language (“wordplay”) and the way words create character and scenes.  Then we will turn to movies made from the plays and to the elaborate and subtle visual “language” movies use to tell stories.  Inevitably, and intentionally, we will speak of what the filmmakers have “done to Shakespeare,” but it is important to recognize that we will see the films not only as versions of the plays but also as original and integral works.  We will also attend to the way the intelligence and imagination of audiences, including ourselves, engage the gaps in time and culture back to other periods, people, and places—to Shakespeare as the 16th century became the 17th, to people in several countries a hundred years ago trying to figure out how to “film Shakespeare,” to Laurence Olivier in World War II Britain, to Akira Kurosawa in Japan in the 1950s and again in the 1980s, to Al Pacino in 1990s’ America, and so forth.  The sweep we make from Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus (c. 1592) to Julie Taymor’s The Tempest (2010) and Joss Whedon's Much Ado about Nothing (2012) should tell us something about the world over the last four hundred years and about ways of seeing it.


Instructor: Peter Kalliney
ENG 384-002: Honors Literature and Film:
Contemporary European Film & Literature  MWF 10-10:50am
Since the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, Europe has been a place of rapid change.  The end of the Cold War, the reunification of Germany, the creation of the European Union and single currency zone, have led some to see Europe as a model of political reconciliation and cultural integration.  On the other hand, the rise of xenophobia and exclusive nationalisms, various military conflicts (in the Balkans and more recently in Ukraine), the ongoing financial crisis, and the current migrant crisis have led others to wonder if European unity is more hopeful fantasy than living reality.  This course on contemporary European film and literature will use cultural texts to introduce students to some of the major debates shaping Europe today: on migration, on reconciliation, on austerity and economic recovery, on local autonomy and political centralization.  Assignments will include reading texts, examining films, contributing to class discussion, and writing short and longer papers.  This class will be an honors course, and although it will be open to non-honors students, everyone should be aware that the course will be demanding as well as fun.

 

ENG 399 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH-RELATED WORK EXPERIENCE. (1-3)
The Department of English internship is available for qualified students to receive academic credit through applied and practical experience with a variety of private and public entities, including but not limited to the University Press of Kentucky. The student will identify a field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience and locate a sponsor to host their internship, which will be supervised by both a responsible person on site and by an English Dept. faculty member (usually the Director of Undergraduate Studies). A learning contract must be completed by the student, the faculty supervisor, and the on-site internship supervisor, then filed with the English Dept.’s Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) in order to receive credit for this course. Credits: 1-3 credit hours, depending on the time required and nature of the internship. Approximately 10 hours a week of internship work equals three credit hours. At midterm, the faculty and on-site supervisors will communicate about the student’s progress so that the faculty member can submit a midterm grade. English 399 will be graded only on a pass-fail basis. Repeatable for a total of up to 6 credit hours. Prereq: To be eligible for the internship, students must (1) be sophomores, juniors or seniors, and (2) have completed both parts of the CCR/composition and communication requirement.


Instructor: Dan Howell
ENG 407-001: Intermediate Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Poetry MW 4-5:15pm

This course will build upon the foundation of knowledge and practice established in ENG 207.  You will be expected to develop greater understanding of the art and craft displayed in published poems; to employ that heightened knowledge and sharpened skills in exercises, including a little work with formal verse; and -- mainly -- to write twelve poems that always strive for their best expression, which our conscientious and constructive workshopping will try to help them attain.  Generally, our class time will be devoted to brief discussions of assigned poems, to exercises designed to generate poems, and to workshop sessions in which we will discuss your poems.  The latter matters most.


Instructor: Manuel Gonzales
ENG 407-401: Intermediate Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction W 6-8:30pm

A continuation of the ENG 207 Introduction to the Workshop, this Intermediate Workshop will focus on developing a deeper understanding of craft and critical consideration of contemporary fiction through student submitted work and student critique. Students will be expected to submit two original works of fiction over the course of the semester -- three if time allows -- and thoughtful and thorough critiques of fellow student work. Students will also be expected to read and respond to contemporary fiction outside of class.


Instructor: Randall Roorda
ENG 425-001: Environmental Writing TR 3:30-4:45pm

This class will sample a range of genres or modes of writing lumped under its title—landscape evocation, natural history description, field guides, scientific ecology, travel pieces, crisis reportage, polemic, reflection, lamentation, celebration and so forth. We’ll get briefed on EW’s influential precursors and acquainted with its present state. We’ll dwell on writing as a practice of engaging with place, of becoming (so to speak) environed. Having surveyed the terrain, participants will be invited to go and do likewise, in writing projects of their own submitted in stages and reviewed in workshop groups. At least one field trip will be mandatory for the class, with dates and details announced at the outset.

Instructor: Jonathan Allison
ENG 440G-001: Studies in British Literature: The Swinging Sixties TR 9:30-10:45am

The poet Philip Larkin wrote: “Sexual intercourse began / In nineteen sixty-three / (which was rather late for me) / Between the end of the Chatterley ban and the Beatles’ first LP.” What did he mean? What was the significance of the end of the ban on Lady Chatterley’s Lover for the censorship and dissemination of culture in Britain? This is a course on British Literature and Culture of the 1960s, including study of the fiction, drama and poetry of the period. This was a decade of cultural and political change, and the turbulent public life of the period forms an exciting backdrop to some of the best writing and film-making of the postwar epoch. Learn about the political forces and events which helped shape the public and cultural life of Britain and Northern Ireland. We shall read fabulous fiction by Muriel Spark, Edna O’Brien, Alan Sillitoe, Iris Murdoch, V.S. Naipaul and William Golding; brilliant plays by Samuel Beckett, John Osborne, Harold Pinter, Joan Littlewood and Edward Bond; and moving poetry by Ted Hughes, Sylvia Plath, John Betjeman, Seamus Heaney, and the Liverpool poets of “The Mersey Beat.” Be prepared to listen to a lot of British music from the swinging sixties, and to watch several iconic films such as Blowup, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, and Lawrence of Arabia. Recommended reading: Dominick Sandbrook, White Heat: A History of Britain in the Swinging Sixties (2007.)


Instructor: Marion Rust
ENG 450G-001: Studies in American Literature: Twice Told Tales MWF 11-11:50am

Every narrative act begins in response, but only a few acknowledge the debt.  This course examines literary acts of appropriation: in particular, books that rewrite novels and the novels they rewrite.  Focusing on late 20th-century publications that re-enact older literary texts in tandem with their predecessors, we will consider how the appropriation of prior cultural moments constructs a particular subsequent one.  Among other pairings, we’ll read: Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Notes from Underground with Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man; Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women with Geraldine Brooks’ March; and Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway with Michael Cunningham’s The Hours.  We will also view the following films: Little Women, starring Winona Ryder as Jo, and The Hours, starring Nicole Kidman as Virginia Woolf.  In addition, we will use the twice-told tale to reflect upon the myriad forms that literary criticism can take. In that spirit, one of the written assignments offers you the option of writing a twice-told tale of your own in response to an assigned text.

Students leaving this course can expect to have developed greater sensitivity to the act of reading and an enhanced ability to reflect upon that act.  They will also know more about the variety of works called novels, and they will be in a better position to question just what makes a “novel” novel, given its explicit or implicit indebtedness to other works of literature. Finally, they will have improved their skill at both spoken and written analysis of the printed word.

Instructor: Rynetta Davis
ENG 460G-001: Studies in African-American Literature: Love & Sex TR 11-12:15pm

English 460 considers how black writers characterize love, sex, and romantic desire from the slave era to the contemporary era.  We will examine how race and gender alter representations of sex, specifically how black women writers such as Harriet Jacobs struggled to mediate stereotypical images of the lascivious black female body both during and after slavery.  We will place Jacobs’s literary text, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), in dialogue with other works including Pauline Hopkins’s Contending Forces (1900), Nella Larsen’s Quicksand (1928), Wallace Thurman’s The Blacker the Berry (1929),  Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937), and Dorothy West’s The Living is Easy (1948).  The following questions will guide our analysis of sex in black literary texts:  How do black authors represent sex and sexuality?  How is sex depicted in African American literary texts?  Is sexual desire expressed overtly, or is it repressed and contained?    


Instructor: Ellen Rosenman
ENG 495-001: Honors Seminar: Storytelling TR 2-3:15pm

Stories are part of every culture and every individual life. We inherit stories about our families, our homelands, our identities, and we make sense of our experience by narrating it to ourselves and others. In this class, we’ll read an array of literary works to explore the how and why of narrative. We’ll begin with short examples of different kinds of stories ranging from classic literary realism to a children’s picture book, and with theories of story-telling from different disciplines. Our aim will be to discover concepts that can guide our reading throughout the semester as we ask some fundamental questions: How do stories construct identity? How do stories reconstruct and understand the past, both individual and historical? How do they imagine a future? How do different ways of telling stories change their meaning? Throughout the semester, we’ll tack back and forth between specific techniques and larger questions about the satisfactions, limitations, and dangers of shaping life into narrative.

Some possible readings: James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, Bernhard Schlink’s The Reader, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess,” Frank X. Walker’s Turn Me Loose: The Unghosting of Medgar Evers, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Kate Atkinson’s Life After Life. I’m open to suggestions, so if you’re thinking of taking this course, email me in advance to let me know what you’d like to read. We’ll also listen to the podcast Serial throughout the semester.

Expect to do several short, informal response papers and two substantial projects, one analytical and one creative, in which you experiment with some story-telling of your own. These projects can be tailored to your individual interests or can be adapted to group work  This will be a largely student-driven course, so come with ideas about what you would like to do and how you would like to do it.


Instructor: Andrew Ewell
ENG 507-001: Advanced Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction R 5-7:30pm

This is a workshop for advanced fiction writers. You’ll write three stories on subjects of your choosing, revise at least one of them, and critique your classmates’ work. Read closely, write with ambition, and aim to “break our hearts,” as Donald Barthelme liked to say, and you’ll come out of this class with a sharper set of tools, and a keener sense of your own attitudes about what literary art can, and should, do.


Instructor: Julia Johnson
ENG 507-002: Advanced Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Poetry MW 4-5:15pm

We meet twice a week for a meeting of advanced poets. We will leave our comfort zones. This class is devoted to poetry by you and by others. It is a workshop-based class. We will together access and read an extensive amount of work by contemporary poets, with a particular focus on poetic forms. The class is a casual operation, largely student driven. What you don’t ask, formulate, present, question, interrogate, assert, or wonder aloud, etc. will remain forever in the empty cavern of your heart.


Instructor: Gurney Norman
ENG 507-003: Advanced Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Autobiography W 5-7:30pm

Fiction is the third of a series of creative writing courses in UK’s Creative Writing Program. It is an advanced course in which students practice the art of fiction writing.  The focus is on short story writing but other forms of narrative fiction (and non-fiction) may be included.  Our class meetings feature writing exercises in which students practice the various aspects of traditional story-writing such as plot development, dialogue, description, character development, and different styles of narration.  Each week throughout the semester, students will bring to each class three pages (800-900 words) of new writing and perform an in-class writing exercise of about the same length for a total of about six pages in the exercise mode each week. In addition to weekly writing exercises in and out of class, you will be asked to produce during the semester two polished, complete original stories that represent your best effort. These procedures are intended to prepare the student to produce serious writing of a professional quality. Class meetings will feature discussion of student work, as well as discussion of published stories by established authors.
 

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