Fall Courses

FALL 2016

A&S 110: Orientation to English  (1)
Instructor: Pearl James
001: F 2-3:00
Freshmen only

All incoming freshmen with a declared English major should take this course, which serves as an introduction and orientation to the major.  You will meet professors, hear about the Creative Writing Option, learn about honors, internships, and study abroad options for English majors.  This class will put you on a track to excel and get the most out of your major.


ENG 107: Introduction to Imaginative Writing
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity)

Instructor: Erik Reece
001: MW 9-9:50 F 9-9:50
002: MW 9-9:50 F 10-10:50
003: MW 9-9:50 F 9-9:50
004: MW 9-9:50 F 11-11:50
ENG 107 is an introduction to the craft of creative writing. Using Donna Burroway's Imaginative Writing, we will explore and experiment with the key elements of creative writing: image, voice, story, character and setting. Students will study and produce their own work in the three genres of fiction, creative nonfiction and poetry.

Instructor: Manuel Gonzales
005: MW 10-10:50 F 10-10:50
006: MW 10-10:50 F 9-9:50
007: MW 10-10:50 F 10-10:50
008: MW 10-10:50 F 11-11:50
Welcome to college. This class will break your heart, blow your mind, and show you what it means to be a creative reader and writer. This is an introduction to the genres and craft of imaginative writing, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will study and practice writing in various modes through composition, peer critique, and research. Attendance and participation are required.

Instructor: Andrew Ewell
009: MW 1-1:50 F 1-1:50
010: MW 1-1:50 F 12-12:50
011: MW 1-1:50 F 1-1:50
012: MW 1-1:50 F 11-11:50
Poems and short stories do many things. They can “lift the veil from the hidden beauty of the world,” as Shelley once remarked, and they can strike like an axe at “the frozen sea within us,” as Kafka declared. They can “entertain and inform” (I.B. Singer), or they can settle the record of “the quarrel with ourselves” (Yeats). They awaken the senses and delight the mind. In the end, poems and stories do no less than give value to life.

This course will introduce you to the various powers of literary art through exposure to some of the best examples of contemporary fiction and poetry available, and it will give you the chance to dip your pens in the ink and experience, for yourselves, the strange and alchemical wonder of writing from the imagination.

Instructor: Michael Carter
013: TR 9:30-10:45

This introductory course in creative writing will explore the various genre: we will play with poetry, fiddle with fiction and nonfiction, as well as grace our souls with other genre. The class will read and discuss literature in various delightful forms to help us understand technique and voice, and practice writing and critiquing our own writing. We will often work in small groups (depending on the number enrolled) as a workshopping method for finding our voices as writers, and for helping our classmates find theirs. By the semester’s end, we will have a mini portfolio of writing.


ENG 130: Literary Encounters
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity)

Law and (Dis)Order in Literature
Instructor: Cheryl Cardiff

001: MWF 11-11:50
006: MWF 9-9:50

THIS COURSE EXPLORES THE QUESTION OF WHAT IT MEANS TO BE HUMAN, though in the context of regulatory systems and the regulation of bodies. We will address a variety of questions: Why do we have laws? How do laws shape us? What happens when certain laws by which we abide conflict with one another? We will involve ourselves with the project of investigating these questions by way of texts, film, and other cultural forms as points of reference. As we concentrate on these primary texts, we’ll look to secondary and background literature to help bring some more perspective on them. Special attention will be given to topics such as private versus public duty, and deviance and defiance. Course work include two papers, your active participation in class discussions, and weekly text responses.

Revenge!
Instructor: Frederick Bengtsson
002: MWF 1-1:50

Revenge: A kind of wild justice, a way of getting retribution when society has failed you, or part of an unending cycle of bloody violence that threatens to destroy society itself? From the mythical dramas of ancient Greece where wives and husbands, children and parents kill one another, to the violence of Renaissance revenge tragedies where blood flows freely and body parts litter the stage, to the frontier justice of the American Western where the good guy goes after the bad guys, this class will consider revenge stories in all their variety, seeing how different times and cultures respond in different ways to this fundamental theme.

Women Behaving Badly
Instructor: Ellen Rosenman
003: TR 11:45-12:15

In “Women Behaving Badly,” we’ll explore literature that calls into question the power of social scripts to shape narratives about women and consider the many, many ways in which women can transgress. How are women supposed to behave as wives, lovers, friends, mothers, daughters? What are the pleasures of misbehaving and what are the punishments? Do we categorize these women as “bad girls” or do we critique the social script?  We’ll read fiction, poetry, and memoir to examine the ways in which literature imagines unconventional stories for women.

Outdoors
Instructor: Randall Roorda
004: TR 12:30-1:45

I am writing this description and you are reading it, probably, in a place we call indoors. What a curious notion! Doors aren’t that old, relatively speaking—a few thousand years, compared to a couple million for the human lineage and six billion, give or take, for the planet. The known universe is mostly devoid of doors: step out your door and there’s a clear path to the nearest colliding black holes. Yet indoors is a category we moderns take as containing most of what’s crucial in what we do. In this class we’ll flip the script, taking indoors as teensy and outdoors as definitive for human culture as for other life forms and galactic happenings. We’ll read, watch, and produce things of a creative nature exploring pursuits peculiar to what we call outdoors: sauntering, trekking, farming, certain sports, regard of nature, etc. It’s true that what we do will mostly transpire indoors, but that’s a necessary irony in a class whose encounters are literary. We’ll try to see that they’re not only that.

Vampires on Page and Screen
Instructor: Michael Carter
005: TR 2-3:15

Blood. Seduction. Sex. Eternal life. What more could describe the allure of the vampire in today’s popular culture? From the folktales of the Carpathian mountains in Eastern Europe, and early 19th century literature comes one of the most enduring creatures to capture the audiences: vampire, Dracula, night walkers. This undead creature has its roots in folklore, and in Romanian history with Vlad Tepis, or Vlad the Impaler, and has found its way into short stories and novels, early and recent  films, and television. This class will examine the roots and the ongoing literature, film and television that indeed gives the vampire eternal life. Quizzes, examinations, and a few short writings and discussions are the expectations for the class work.

Remaking Jane Eyre
Instructor: Janet Eldred
007: MW 3-4:15

What makes a classic like Jane Eyre work—over time and in so many incarnations?  This section of ENG 130 will begin with Charlotte Bronte’s novel Jane Eyre and move on to at least two film adaptions.  We’ll then look at two “literary” works inspired by the novel—Jean Rhys’s 1966 Wide Sargasso Sea and Rita Maria Martinez’s 2016 poetry collection The Jane and Bertha in Me.  Of course, before moving on to your own creative projects inspired by this classic, we’ll dip our toes into the world of Jane Eyre fan fiction.  Expect to read, write short informal responses, take a midterm examination, and compose a creative project.



ENG 142: Global Shakespeare
(satisfies UK Core: Global Dynamics and Inquiry in the Humanities)
Instructor: Emily Shortslef
001: TR 11-12:15
002: TR 12:30-1:45

Originally written and performed in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century England, Shakespeare’s plays have had long and fascinating afterlives within as well as outside of Great Britain and the English language. In this course, we’ll read some of Shakespeare’s best-known plays alongside adaptations of these works from around the world (in film, theater, and other art forms). As we read the plays, we’ll discuss the theatrical culture and social milieu of Shakespeare’s England, but we’ll also consider what makes these plays so suited to reinterpretation and retelling across differences of language, culture, place, and time. No knowledge of foreign languages is required. Assignments will consist of short papers, a midterm, and a final exam.


ENG 171: Global Literature in English
Instructor: Peter Kalliney
001: TR 12:30-1:45

In 1827, JW von Goethe famously said, "National literature is now a rather unmeaning term; the epoch of world literature is at hand, and everyone must strive to hasten its approach."  Despite Goethe's demand that we read literature in a global context, the study of literature in English continues to be dominated by British and American examples.  What would a course on global literature in English look like?  To what extent is English now a global language, no longer the property of any national group?  How has fiction contributed to this process?  This experiment in reading extra-national literature turns to some of the language's most compelling novelists--such as James Joyce, JM Coetzee, Sam Selvon--to explore the idea of global citizenship and cosmopolitan English.  The course will consider how 20th- and 21st-Century writers approach the problem of belonging to, and being excluded from, national territories and nationalist affiliations.  Examinations, quizzes, writing assignments, attendance and participation, and level of preparedness will be used to evaluate student performance.


ENG 207: Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing

Non-Fiction
Instructor: Chad Gilpin
001: MWF 10-10:50

Writing creative nonfiction means employing literary styles and techniques to craft factual but engaging narratives from our own lives and the lives of those around us. In this class, we will explore different types of creative nonfiction and learn to shape our experiences into works of art. Reading assignments will focus on exploring the variety and techniques of the genre, while writing assignments will ask you to employ those techniques in crafting your own unique stories.

Fiction
Instructor: Cheryl Cardiff
002: MWF 1-1:50

DEAR AUTHOR: THIS COURSE INTRODUCES YOU to the forms and practices of creative writing. Focusing on each individual, our workshop will develop the skill in writing stories and/or personal narratives. To help foster your work, weekly exercises will help you develop an understanding of the elements of the craft such as character development, narrative structure, dialogic engagement, and scene development. You also will be expected to read peer work with care and to discuss this writing with constructive, informed, and articulate criticism to specific elements of the text that go beyond simple like and dislike. The study of works by writers such as Annie Proulx, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Wallace Stegner in the context of craft—as opposed to literary interpretation or historical analysis—is a critical part of your artistic discipline and creative output. The main feature of the course is (of course) THE WORKSHOP itself, and you will have the opportunity to provide stories for peer evaluation three times over thecourse of the semester. Vital to writing is re-writing, of returning to your work and sculpting it into the shape you wish it to take. For your efforts, you will have the opportunity to further develop one workshopped piece for a second round of peer and instructor critique. As you practice becoming an effective and careful reader of both peer and established writing, you do become an effective and careful reader of your own. Writing, reading, and evaluating peer work all further your own creative practice. By the end of the term, you will feature your two workshopped stories and your choice of three shorter “best effort” writing exercises in a portfolio that you can be proud of, and one day, pass on to future progeny and fans.

Screenwriting
Instructor: Dan Howell
003: W 4-6:30

In this class you’ll be looking at and studying screenplays, films, and excerpted textbook readings to help you develop a working familiarity with screenplay format, narrative structures (beats and plots), characters, settings, writing narrative action, and dialogue. The better part of that familiarity will be generated through the writing you’ll do both in and out of class, and will include such specialized forms as loglines, treatments, and -- necessarily and most importantly -- a screenplay for a short film or a portion of a feature-length film. The class will also require cooperative activities such as group-work on various pieces of writing, as well as workshopping as much as we can manage, especially as the semester progresses and you’re generating your screenplays. Grades will be based on writing assignments, occasional brief quizzes, timely submission of assignments, participation, and a Portfolio containing a treatment and revised screenwriting work.

Poetry
Instructor: Julia Johnson
004: TR 12:30-1:45

This class is devoted to poetry writing by you and others. It is a workshop-based class. You will be given writing assignments and readings designed to unleash your creativity and spark your powers of observation, imagination, and memory.  We will discuss the art and craft of writing poetry, and we will workshop one another's work with enthusiasm and care. We will read an extensive amount of work by modern and contemporary poets.

Fiction
Instructor: Gary Smith
005: TR 2-3:15
006: TR 3:30-4:45

Our main goal is to familiarize ourselves with the genre of fiction by reading, analyzing, discussing, and writing short stories. The first portion of the semester will focus on reading published short stories from established authors to analyze elements of craft, style, and convention. We will also do weekly exercises in fiction writing to hone skills. From there, students will begin drafting their own stories to share with the class. We will workshop students’ stories in class to provide constructive feedback for revision.



ENG 230: Introduction to Literature
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Humanities)

Traveling Time
Instructor: Katie Waddell
001: MWF 9-9:50
003: MWF 11-11:50

From Instagram filters and horn-rimmed glasses to the post-apocalyptic Hunger Games, our increasingly nostalgic culture looks simultaneously to the past and to the future. This course will introduce students to fiction, drama, poetry, non-fiction, and film––from Rip Van Winkle to Mad Max. We will focus on the theme of time travel in order to interrogate the boundaries between the past, present, and future. By looking at both physical and mental time travel, including literature that “time travels” to historical periods, we will think critically about how we remember and visualize ourselves and our culture in terms of time.

Scottish and Irish Literature, Thistle and Shamrock
Instructor: Jonathan Allison
002: MWF 10-10:50

A course on Scottish and Irish literature and culture, focusing on modern fiction, poetry, drama and the visual arts in relation to cultural and political backgrounds. Topics to be explored include history, memory, identity, sexuality and gender. We will also discuss the significance of Scotland and Ireland in the imagination of the USA, and cultural and political relations between America, Britain, and Ireland.

Monsters, Freaks, and Geeks: Tales of the Strange and Wondrous
Instructor: Michelle Sizemore
004: TR 9:30-10:45

This semester we’ll be gripped by texts that turn the spotlight on individuals who, by either choice or force, inhabit the margins of mainstream society. Through an ensemble of texts that mix horror, fantasy, tragedy, and humor, we will explore how writers over the past two centuries have used stories of “monsters,” “freaks,” and “geeks” to ask profound questions about differences among humans, as well as differences between humans and other beings: What are the limits and excesses of the human? How have bodies been markers of otherness? How are feelings of strangeness and wonder connected with social othering? In this class we will pay special attention to how cultures have constructed anomalous social categories in order to define or secure membership in a common group. We will be equally concerned with how race, class, sexuality, gender, and disability factor into these designations and divisions. Along the way we will carefully consider similarities and differences among those who have been disparagingly categorized as “monsters,” “freaks,” and “geeks.”

Plugged In: Humans and the Rise of Machines
Instructor: Deirdre Mikolajcik
005: TR 11-12:15
006: TR 12:30-1:45

Instagram. Facebook. Twitter. Tumblr. Pinterest. The digital age has made it easier than ever to connect with our friends, but where is the human in all this? Speculations and suspicions about artificial intelligence, robotics, and life mediated by a screen abound in contemporary culture. Essays, movies, and novels foresee a plugged-in consciousness, with little left of a sensate body that moves and breathes and reads. Despite the new technology, there is nothing new about this debate. Keeping “human” at the center of this humanities course, we’ll explore the question of what, exactly, it means to be human. Students will be introduced to literary analysis by following the development of debates surrounding humanity in literature, from the ghosts of Early Modern England to the futurescape of the 2015 film Ex Machina.

Literature of the Apocalypse
Instructor: Valerie Stevens
007: TR 2-3:15
008: 3:30-4:45

It’s the end of the world as we know it, and we feel…a tremendous amount of anxiety that is expressed in our literature. This class looks at how unease about change plays out in apocalyptic literature. We will explore how shifts in politics, scientific understandings, the environment, as well as significant personal transitions are all represented in a continued literary fascination with the end of times. Furthermore, we consider the label of “apocalyptic literature” itself and the varieties of texts that we might classify under that term. Texts for this course include: Edgar Allan Poe’s The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, H.G. Wells’s The War of the Worlds, Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, and Mad Max: Fury Road.


ENG 241: Survey of British Literature I
Instructor: Joyce MacDonald
001: TR 11-12:15

English 241 is a survey of the development of British (not just “English”) literature from its beginnings through the early seventeenth century. Obviously, we will not be able to cover all literary developments in a period of more than a thousand years in equal depth. Instead, the course will have four major goals:

• To give students an overview of the major modes of writing, significant texts, and important authors in the English language over this long period

• To trace a history of the development of the English language over time

• To help students build a critical vocabulary for discussing and analyzing pre-modern  literature

• To introduce students to important research tools for studying and writing about literature

ENG 241 counts toward the survey requirement for the English major and may fulfill other requirements for other majors in and out of Arts and Sciences.


ENG 242: Survey of British Literature II
Instructor: Lisa Zunshine
001: MW 9-9:50 F 9-9:50
002: MW 9-9:50 F 10-10:50

English 242 is the second part of the British literature survey, covering the period from the late seventeenth to the twentieth century, focusing on the cultural history of literature and on major genres and authors. We’ll start with a Restoration comedy, move on to a novel doubling as a criminal autobiography, and conclude with a play about mistaken identities. Requirements include regular attendance, quizzes, and two long papers.


ENG 251: Survey of American Literature I
Instructor: Armando Prats
001: MW 1-1:50 F 1-1:50
002: MW 1-1:50 F 12-12:50

We will begin our survey of American literature at a time just before there was an “America” and maybe even before there was a “literature.” We will then move to American literature before it appeared in the English language—for example in the captivity narrative of the genius of survivalist adaptation, Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca. We will then travel north to Virginia and cover some of the writings of John Smith (of Pocahontas—and Disney!—fame), especially in his relation with American Indians and the great Powhatan. Then up to New England, where we stay a good while, mostly reading the Puritans—Bradford and Winthrop, for example, but also of their wars against the Indians, beginning with the Pequot War of 1637 and King Philip’s War (1675-76). From this period, we will also pay special attention to narratives of Indian captivity (this is racy stuff!), especially those of Mary White Rowlandson and of Hannah Dustan, with special attention to versions of their stories told well over a century later by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry David Thoreau. From here to Virginia and Mr. Jefferson, warts and all—the Jefferson of the Declaration and of the slaves of Monticello. And soon enough we will come to Kentucky and John Filson’s account of the great hero and Indian fighter—the one, the only, Dan’l Boone. By this time we should be on the verge of the great national election of 2016, and will have enough of a background in American literature and culture to see if we can make sense of the rhetoric of the politicians and whether what they say and promise resonates with what we have studied so far. In this political context we will read Frederick Douglass’s Narrative (perhaps with quick YouTube looks at Eric Garner, Freddie Gray, Sandra Bland, and other like victims, and perhaps a clip or two of Solomon Northup in 12 Years a Slave and Oscar Grant in Fruitvale Station), followed by selections from Thoreau’s Walden in the context of “Four Hiroshima bombs of heat per second,” and his “Civil Disobedience” in the context of whatever drivel is still coming out of the candidates. Toward the end of the semester, when the political dust has settled, we will read—that we may remember America’s best and most generous—Walt Whitman’s poetry.


ENG 252: Survey of American Literature II
Instructor: Pearl James
001: MW 11-11:50 F 11-11:50
002: MW 11-11:50 F 10-10:50

This course offers a survey of American literature from Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn to the present. What kind of American identity is literature describing and helping to form?  What are the burdens, benefits, and responsibilities that American institutions create, and that American fiction writers attempt to influence?  After reading Twain, we will consider various apparitions of “the modern” and “modernism,” as they appear in representative American texts by Stein, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Eliot, and Hemingway, and in the first movie with synchronized sound, The Jazz Singer.  We will pay special attention to the ways in which modernism is gendered (as monstrous women, as wounded men) and the ways in which it depends upon and confounds racial categories: is it “mongrel”?  or does the “modern” encounter give rise to both “blackness” and “whiteness”? With Faulkner as our turning point, we will turn from the modern period to the post-1945 period and to literature that explores the problems of narrating America’s secrets, past and present.  Can literature enable us to mourn our collective mistakes and losses?  Can it challenge us to re-imagine our national past and future?

Midterm, final, two papers, and short assignments over the course of the semester.
 

HON 252: Honors In Arts & Creativity
(satisfies UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in Humanities)

Black Lives in the Archives
Instructor: Nazera Wright
003: TR 11-12:15

This course explores an emerging field within U.S. literary studies: black print culture. In his 2010 article “The Talking Book and the Talking Book Historian,” Leon Jackson argues that there exists a “failure to communicate” or “cross-pollinate” between book historians and scholars of African American literature (Book History 13 (2010): 252). Book history includes the field of black print culture studies, defined as the network of contributors beyond a single author that participated in the production and transmission of a text. We will read an interdisciplinary range of poems, manifestos, short stories, novels, and anti-lynching plays by black writers such as David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Frances E. W. Harper, Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Angelina Weld Grimké that were published in a variety of print sources—from black newspapers and magazines to advice columns and autograph books. Students will learn how to access and incorporate materials from the archive to enrich their own research projects.

We will consider the following questions:
1. What are the critical models and archival methods shaping the field of black print culture? What can we gain from examining the intersections between African American literature and print culture?
2. Why were black newspapers one of the primary options available for black writers to publish their short stories and novels in the early decades of the nineteenth century?
3. How do the format and layout patterns of African American literary texts published in black newspapers and magazines function as informational sources produced to mobilize black communities to fight for full citizenship rights, protect families and abolish slavery?
4. How do specific themes found within print culture studies—questions of materiality, production, dissemination and consumption—teach us about early black print culture?
5. How can we learn to conduct our own archival research by exploring the design, distribution, promotion, circulation and reception of African American writing published in nineteenth-century print and material sources?


ENG 260/AAS 264: Introduction to Black Writers
(satisfies GWR)
Instructor: Benjamin Wilson
001: MWF 10-10:50
002: MWF 12-12:50

In 1903, the pioneering African-American writer WEB DuBois wrote that “the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line.” Although most civil rights activists, scholars, and observers agree that DuBois was prophetically correct when he wrote those words, the events of the last fifteen years demonstrate that the “problem of the color line” did not end when the twentieth century gave way to the twenty-first. In this course, we will read, discuss, and write about several significant works of twentieth-century black literature, starting with DuBois and ending with Toni Morrison. We will consider both the color line and the related phenomenon of double consciousness (another of DuBois’ concepts). We will furthermore consider how these works of literature enact, are marked by, and ultimately try to work against and overcome the color line and double consciousness. While at times what we read will feel strikingly contemporary and may even have parallels with some recent and current events, it is important to remember that the purpose of this course is to first and foremost understand the readings as works of art and cultural artifacts. Through sustained engagement with these writers, we may discover our vision of what it means to be a person in the world transformed.


ENG 266: Survey of African-American Literature I
Instructor: Rynetta Davis
001: TR 11-12:15

English 266 is a survey of African American literary texts from 1901 to the 21st century that represent and explore what it means to be black and “American.”  This course will examine how American identities are informed by race, class, and gender.  We will consider how African American literature has evolved and significantly influenced various social and political movements in this country, such as Emancipation and Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, (black) feminism, and Hip Hop.


ENG 280: Introduction to Film
(satisfies GWR)

Instructor: Matthew Godbey
001: MWF 9-9:50
002: MWF 10-10:50

This course will introduce students to the study of film by examining films set in and around American cities throughout the 20th and 21st Centuries. Over the course of the semester, students will learn to closely analyze individual films by examining the formal aspects of movies across a wide assortment of genres and by looking at films in their specific historical, cultural, and political contexts. Together, all of these approaches will help us use the films as a starting point for conversations about cities and urban life and the relationship between film and the urban experience. Assigned readings will assist out conversations and focus on the formal and thematic analysis of film, which will help us to deepen our appreciation for the ways motion pictures are constructed and make meaning, and to tackle issues dealing with what film can teach us about the variety of responses to urban life throughout American history.

Instructor: Dan Howell
003: MWF 11-11:50
005: MWF 1-1:50

This is a basic introduction to the study of film, which includes film history as well as elements of film form such as mise-en-scène, editing, cinematography, sound, film genres, and the narrative structures of films. Each of these subjects brings with it an array of terms that we’ll use when discussing and anlayzing films; our required text, The Film Experience (4th ed.) will be the source of those terms as well as a resource for explanations and illustrations, supplemented by the frequent in-class screening of clips, trailers, and shorts (even a cartoon or two). But our primary focus will be 13 feature-length films that range across time -- from the 1920s till recently -- and genres (comedy, horror, musical, crime etc.) There will be at least one silent film, one foreign film, several black-and-white films, and R-rated films. (If graphic language, nudity, sexuality and/or violence will offend you, you should drop the class.) All films will be screened twice on the day before we discuss them, and all will be on reserve and available to you in the library. Each week will feature a different film, and by the end of the semester you will have seen some great films, plus you’ll be acquainted with many film artists and films that are new to you: you’ll be a more knowledgeable, sophisticated filmgoer.

Visions & The Future
Instructor: Frederick Bengtsson
004: MWF 12-12:50

Since their earliest days, movies have transported us into the future. Whether on a space odyssey in 2001, or back to the future of 2015, or down a bleak and desolate road after the end of the world as we know it, filmmakers have imagined lives beyond our own, and allowed us to experience them. This course will introduce students to the study of cinema as a medium by exploring these visions of the future, asking how and why they are made, what is at stake in these representations of times to come, and what they want to tell us about our present moment.

Instructor: Walter Foreman
006: TR 9:30-10:45

This section of ENG 280 is an introduction to the study of the movies as a narrative art and a cultural document, with emphasis on the former.  The movies we will watch will be chosen from a variety of genres, national cinemas, and time periods.  The course will develop students' skills in interpretation and analysis of film and in evaluating competing interpretations of films.  The "evaluation" of movies we will do will not be about assigning stars or pointing thumbs up or down, nor will the evaluation of interpretations necessarily be designed to accept one and reject its competitors.  All the movies for this section will feature an Unexpected Adventure.  The central character or characters are going about their "normal" lives when they suddenly find themselves in another story, full of novelty and of danger . . . but also offering an opportunity to grow, to discover their capabilities, to develop relationships with others, that their earlier stories had not.  Most of our characters (but not all) seize these opportunities, either by choice or by necessity.  The stories will examine their fitness for adventure, their physical, moral, intellectual, and spiritual resources and powers, their capacities for collaboration where survival depends on it, their abilities to live in a "new" world, and the consequences of success or failure—and how to tell these apart.  Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities.  Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.

From Dorothy to Mad Max: Heroes in Film
Instructor: Kadee Whaley
007: TR 11-12:15
008: TR 12:30-1:45

When people think of heroic figures in film, caped crusaders, action heroes, and gunslingers come to mind. We will consider these types of heroes and many more across a variety of film genres. We will reflect on the values each hero embodies from their decade as well as the cultural threat represented by the villains they face. We will also consider heroic figures that face more abstract challenges such as racism, sexism, the threat of obscurity, and the inevitability of death. Can a character be heroic without a villain to fight? How is the hero’s journey different from the heroine’s journey? Students will learn to identify and employ film techniques to develop interpretations of cinematic meaning, analyze the meaning of heroism, and consider the hero's impact on cinema as an artistic medium and cultural document. Die Hard, Blazing Saddles, Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope, Scream, and Mad Max: Fury Road are just a few of films we will be tackling on our own heroic journey throughout the course. 

Instructor: Randall Roorda
009: TR 3:30-4:45

This introduction to film features movies from their inception to nearly the present day. It will stress how cinema has developed as a set of conventions, a language of sorts, especially in the apotheosis of classical Hollywood style (and in the efforts of those who swat at the flanks of this beast). You'll watch a movie a week, write responses to what you watch, take quizzes, and write a couple short papers.

Memory, Amnesia, and Film
Instructor: Delmar Reffett
010: T 5-7:30
011: R 5-7:30

Few things are more central to our lived experience than our ability (or inability) to remember; our memories color not only how we relate to our past, but also how we think about ourselves in the present, and how we plan to behave in the future. Given this importance, it is little wonder that film, in trying to speak to that very lived experience, returns again and again to questions surrounding memory. Why do we remember? Why do we forget? How do memories affect the way we live and communicate? Do memories make our lives better? Or are they ultimately a burden?  In this course, we will be watching a selection of films that center on these and other questions about memory, examining them both for the structural and visual elements of film as a form and how these elements contribute to each film’s exploration of remembering and forgetting. Attention will be paid not only to how these films discuss the memories of the individual, but also how our memories relate us to others, and to larger social and historical events.

 

ENG 290: Introduction to Women’s Literature

(satisfies GWR)
Instructor: Janet Eldred
001: MWF 11-11:50

Love, intimacy, violence, family, illness, and all manner of mayhem.  This introduction to literature by women focuses on U.S. women who “lived to tell the tale” and changed the scripts we read and see.  Authors include Adrienne Rich, Toni Morrison, Julia Alvarez, Susan Glaspell, and other amazing writers.

Gender and Autobiography
Instructor: Marion Rust
002: TR 11-12:15

Is there such a thing as “women’s autobiography”? We will address this question through a variety of critically acclaimed recent texts, including: rapper-poet-playwright Kate Tempest’s Hold Your Own; prematurely deceased Ivy League graduate Marina Keegan’s The Opposite of Loneliness; TED-talker Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist; MacArthur “genius” grant award-winner and graphic novelist Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home; Iranian graphic novelist and filmmaker Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis; Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s My Beloved World; and ‘70s rocker Patti Smith’s Just Kids. One thing that unites all the narratives in this class is that each writer was inspired to publish in order to confront, reveal and come to terms with unexpected hardship.


ENG 330: Text and Context
(satisfies GCCR for English majors)

Robinson Crusoe
Instructor: Michael Genovese
001: MWF 12-12:50

Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, published in 1719, is widely regarded as the first novel.  In many ways, it gave birth to prose fiction as we still know it today: as a story that takes place in a familiar, realistic world occupied by people doing things we recognize as everyday.  But what is familiar?  Realistic?  Everyday?  Are people and characters even the same thing?  As we study Defoe’s novel, we will stretch into its literary past and future in order to explore these questions and come to terms with what it meant to be the “first” novel and what it still means to be a novel today.  We will read novels by Defoe as well as works selected from the following novelists: Bunyan, Haywood, Coetzee, and Joyce.  There will also be regular reading of responses to Robinson Crusoe, both from the past and the present.  Expect approximately 80 pages of reading per week, as well as 15-20 pages of writing.  Active participation is required, and there will be a cumulative final exam. 

American Fiction in the Progressive Age 
Instructor: Michael Trask
002: MW 3:30-4:15

The period between 1890 and 1914 has long been of interest to scholars of American culture. It is not hard to see why. This era spawned an array of developments that continue to shape American life in our own time.  Chief among these is what the literary critic Alan Trachtenberg called “the incorporation of America,” sometimes called the “second industrial revolution,” which entailed the rise of both mass culture and consumerism as widespread facts of life.  Mark Twain named this period the “gilded age” (it was the title of an 1873 novel he co-wrote) to capture the seediness or fraudulence of the new class of rich who dominated the era: those “robber barons” of the late 19th century who often cornered markets, bribed politicians, and otherwise used any means at their disposal to make and keep their wealth.  Progressivism names the political philosophy—as well as political party—that arose to help curb what its adherents saw as the excesses of laissez-faire capitalism and government corruption. This class will focus on the most important novelists who sought to grapple with the new landscape of American life around the turn of the 20th century. We’ll be especially mindful of the three key genres in fiction of the time: realism, naturalism, and regionalism (or local color).  The class will tackle the following events and themes: the emergence of industrial capitalism; Populism; the establishment of Jim Crow; gender relations (this was the era of a pioneering feminism); We’ll read the following novels and shorter fiction: William Dean Howells, The Rise of Silas Lapham; Henry James, The Spoils of Poynton; Stephen Crane, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets; Kate Chopin, The Awakening; Charles Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars; Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “The Yellow Wallpaper”; Pauline Hopkins, Contending Forces; Theodore Dreiser, Sister Carrie; Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth.  There will be two short papers, a midterm, and a final project / class presentation based on your own original research on the period’s fiction.

Paul Beatty’s White Boy Shuffle
Instructor: Rynetta Davis
003: TR 9:30-10:45

Paul Beatty’s debut novel, The White Boy Shuffle, takes no prisoners.  No race, ethnicity, or gender is exempt from critique in Beatty’s satire.  Much like Chris Rock’s recent opening monologue at the 2016 Oscars, Gunnar Kaufman, Beatty’s protagonist, pushes the limits and the boundaries to make everyone around him uncomfortable.  Gunnar defies categorization while simultaneously forcing his peers to rethink their prejudices and cultural stereotypes.  This text and context course places Beatty’s literary work in conversation with other key narratives that demonstrate how African American literary history consistently uses humor as a way to dismantle, disrupt, and destabilize racist practices.  We will study Beatty’s literary text alongside episodes of the television sitcom, Blackish, and the comedy routines of popular black comedians including Dave Chappelle.
 

Moby Dick & Its Afterlives
Instructor: Michelle Sizemore
004: TR 11-12:15

Melville’s breathtaking tale of a Nantucket whaling voyage compelled D.H. Lawrence to write that Moby Dick “commands a stillness to the soul, an awe. It is one of the strangest and most wonderful books in the world.”  Melville continues to fascinate. In the past decade alone, Moby Dick has inspired hundreds of adaptations in painting, film, drama, opera, music, television, graphic novels, comic books, and cartoons.  The recent upsurge in interest speaks to the novel’s enormous relevance in our own time. Melville was eerily prescient on the critical concerns that preoccupy us in the twenty-first century, raising questions that will focus our discussions of race, gender, imperialism, the body, and the environment. To begin, we will read Moby Dick and investigate its nineteenth-century social, cultural, and intellectual contexts. This historical perspective will in turn frame our contemporary moment, as the novel provides context for topics ranging from body art to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. In the second half of the semester, we will explore the wide-ranging cultural and artistic influences of Moby Dick, including Ahab’s Wife, written in 1999 by former Kentucky Poet Laureate Sena Jeter Naslund.


ENG 337 Literature and Genre
Literature of the American West
Instructor: Michael Carter
001: TR 12:30-1:45

Since Europeans “settled” the U.S. and Manifest Destiny proclaimed all the land theirs, the voices of the West and the Western pioneers have bounced against each other. This course will examine several of these voices, from a primarily European American perspective (early 19th Century to contemporary writers) with the objective of discovering their shared and conflicted selves. We will focus on themed to late 20th century fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose of writers as diverse as Wallace Stegner  Gary Snyder, Dorothy Johnson, Maxine Hong Kingston, Richard Hugo, Wallace Stevens, Thomas McGuane, and many others. We should have a rollicking good semester of reading and discussion. We’ll write two shorter, 5-6 page essays, and one larger end-of-semester 10-12 page essay and do some historical and contextual research.


ENG 338 Topics in Literature
Vendettas, Vengeance, and Violence
Instructor: Frederick Bengtsson
001: MWF 9-9:50

Payback. Revenge. Living by the sword, and dying by the sword. Eyes for eyes, teeth for teeth, and for that matter almost any body-part one could think of. Why do playwrights, writers, and filmmakers—from Shakespeare to Tarantino—constantly return to the theme of vengeance, and do so in such spectacularly violent ways? What, if anything, is at stake in these works beyond their entertainment value? This class will focus on the drama of revenge, thinking about how and why these works explore the vengeance, justice, and the troubled and troubling relationship between the two.


ENG 339: Author Studies
James Joyce and Irish Literature
Instructor: Jonathan Allison
001: MWF 11:11-50

A course on the work of the novelist James Joyce (1880-1941) and various other writers of the period, including W.B.Yeats, Lady Gregory, and Frank O’Connor. Our reading will include Joyce’s volume of short stories, Dubliners (1914), and his novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and Ulysses (1922). We’ll watch some movie adaptations of the fiction, including The Dead (John Huston, 1987), and Ulysses (Joseph Strick, 1967), as well as recent adaptations of Molly Bloom’s soliloquy. We’ll examine Joyce in the context of his life and times, in relation to the literary, cultural and political traditions of Ireland, Britain and Europe. Readings will include selected poems and plays by Yeats and Lady Gregory, and short stories by Frank O’Connor. We shall consider the legacy of Joyce and discuss how his influence continues in the literature and culture of the 20th century. If you take this course you need never say you haven’t read Ulysses.


ENG 342: Shakespeare
Instructor: Walter Foreman
001: TR 11-12:15

An introductory survey of Shakespeare's plays, covering all forms (comedies, histories, and tragedies) and periods (early, middle, and late).  We will examine Shakespearean theater and performance (physical and philosophical architecture, performance as interpretation, visualization of written texts, audience as part of action, play as play); Shakespearean language and its relation to "truth" (arguments, meanings, metaphors, puns, verse, poetry: in short, wordplay); the way the structure of the plays produces meaning (function and order of scenes); the way words make characters, and the way characters interact, verbally and visually; and the social implications of the plays (for both the 16/17th and the 20th centuries) and the ways audiences (including ourselves) interpret the plays.  Likely to be included are A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Richard II, Henry IV Part 1, Othello, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Tempest.


ENG 355: American Poetic Traditions
Instructor: Marion Rust
001: TR 2-3:15

“A poem does what it says.”  In this class, we will return to my own undergraduate passion based on those words: American poetry from the late 20th century through the present day.  Some names might be familiar to you, such as Kate Tempest, rapper-poet-playwright extraordinaire (a quick visit to YouTube is worth the trip), or Nikky Finney, former UK professor and winner of the National Book Award.  Other names are potentially new, such as Linda Gregerson, author of Prodigal: New and Selected Poems, 1976 to 2014.  Still others are immortalized in poetic circles but relatively unknown in the world at large, such as language poets Susan Howe and Charles Bernstein.  In addition to these groundbreaking recent works, we will peruse some of the classics without whom poetry as we know it could not exist.  Possibilities range from 19th-century revolutionaries Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman to 20th-century luminaries Adrienne Rich, Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, Audre Lorde and Frank O’Hara.


ENG 391: Literary Theory
Instructor: Matthew Giancarlo
001: TR 2-3:15

Since the 1940’s “literary theory” has emerged as a vibrant and vital aspect of literary studies. The term covers a wide range of formal, historical, and critical approaches to literature and culture that have changed the ways we read. This course investigates selected trends and schools of modern literary theory in diverse texts and contexts. These can include formalism, Practical Criticism, and the New Criticism; French Structuralism and the various modes of post-structuralism (Semiotics, Deconstruction, Reader-response, Speech-act theory); historicism and the New Historicism; as well as broader modes of cultural critique such as Feminism, Marxism, Critical Theory and the Frankfurt School, Post-colonialism, Critical Race Theory, and more. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 

ENG 399 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH-RELATED WORK EXPERIENCE. (1-3)
The Department of English internship is available for qualified students to receive academic credit through applied and practical experience with a variety of private and public entities, including but not limited to the University Press of Kentucky. The student will identify a field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience and locate a sponsor to host their internship, which will be supervised by both a responsible person on site and by an English Dept. faculty member (usually the Director of Undergraduate Studies). A learning contract must be completed by the student, the faculty supervisor, and the on-site internship supervisor, then filed with the English Dept.’s Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) in order to receive credit for this course. Credits: 1-3 credit hours, depending on the time required and nature of the internship. Approximately 10 hours a week of internship work equals three credit hours. At midterm, the faculty and on-site supervisors will communicate about the student’s progress so that the faculty member can submit a midterm grade. English 399 will be graded only on a pass-fail basis. Repeatable for a total of up to 6 credit hours. Prereq: To be eligible for the internship, students must (1) be sophomores, juniors or seniors, and (2) have completed both parts of the CCR/composition and communication requirement.


ENG 407: Intermediate Workshop in Imaginative Writing

001: CANCELLED

Poetry
Instructor: Julia Johnson
002: R 4-6:30

This is the advanced poetry workshop and it may be repeated for credit.  Our class meetings will be an intense gathering of poets dedicated to polishing strong portfolios of work. We will leave our comfort zones. This class is devoted to poetry by you and by others. It is a workshop-based class. We will together access and read an extensive amount of work by contemporary poets, with a particular focus on poetic forms. The class needs its participants to be active. What you don’t ask, formulate, present, question, interrogate, assert, or wonder aloud, etc. will remain forever in the empty cavern of your heart.

Autobiography
Instructor: Gurney Norman
003: T 5-7:30

The premise of this course in autobiographical writing is that every person has stories to tell about her or his experiences of life. It is assumed that each member of the class is self-motivated to write his or her individual life-stories. Many will want to write their stories from deep personal need as part of their journey of self-discovery. Others will be more interested in making a record of their lives and thoughts for future use in a book-length autobiography, and for use by family members as part of the family’s collective memory. Perhaps the writer will simply want to record long-held feelings, emotions, facts, secrets and other forms of self-expression. Regardless of motive, the basic task for each student writer is to produce 7-10 standard manuscript pages per week for a total of at least eighty pages. Students should feel free to write more than these minimum pages during the semester.  Beyond the required eighty pages there are no restrictions on length or subject matter. The Instructor will respond to the work of each individual through written comments, individual conferences and spoken comments during the class meetings. Fellow students are invited to offer suggestions and themselves take turns reading aloud passages of their writing to the assembled class members. A premise of the course is that students are serious people who think deeply about their lives and may very well one day write and publish serious books. English 507 Autobiography is a step toward that end.

Fiction
Instructor: Gurney Norman
004: M 5-7:30

English 407 is an intermediate-level course designed to give students practice in writing fiction including short stories, novels and first-person personal narratives. The class meets once each week for two and one-half hours. The format allows the class to proceed in a relaxed atmosphere featuring in-class writing exercises, discussion of students' original writing, discussion of traditional and contemporary fiction by established writers and a series of brief lectures by Professor Norman. Students will be asked to produce three or four pages of first-draft (newly written) work each week and three completed, polished "best effort" stories or chapters during the semester. Students are encouraged to experiment with different styles and methods of fiction writing including explorations of digital fiction. One premise of the course is that in some ways it approximates a literary salon where writers gather, perhaps with a mentor, to enjoy each other's company and to support each other in his or her creative work. The class meetings are designed so that in every session each student will read something, write something, say something and listen to what others have to say, all in the spirit of experiencing the basic activities of the professional writer's life. It is hoped that in a semester of such activity students can come to understand that creative writing is not an intellectual or academic enterprise. It is a creative enterprise that uses the imagination and draws on the personal experiences of the student authors. Storytelling and story-making are ancient arts, practiced by people who lived long before the invention of writing. In some oral narrative traditions, spoken stories have a sacred quality.  English 407 is not a course in the oral storytelling traditions but the course does recognize that modern story writing is descended from ancient storytelling.


ENG 425: Environmental Writing
Instructor: Erik Reece
001: MWF 12-12:50

This course will introduce students to both the literature and the practice of environmental writing. We will learn from the masters of the genre, then we will employ those lessons in various forms of environmental writing, including the personal, experiential, polemic, and journalistic. We will emphasize writing with empathy, passion, authority and concreteness. The class will include a mandatory weekend field trip to UK’s Robinson Forest.


ENG 440G: Studies in British Literature
Rise of the Novel
Instructor: Lisa Zunshine
001: MWF 11-11:50

This course will focus on the eighteenth-century English novel: its “rise” and historical origins, as well as its recent cinematic adaptations. We’ll read novels by Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Frances Burney, and Jane Austen. Requirements include quizzes, short papers, and two long papers.


ENG 450G: Studies in American Literature
Hawthorne/Melville
Instructor: Armando Prats
001: TR 3-4:15

On August 17 and 24 of 1850, the New York Literary World published an essay, “Hawthorne and His Mosses,” by a “A Virginian Spending July in Vermont.” On the surface of it, the essay merely heaped high praise on Mosses from an Old Manse, a collection of short stories that Nathaniel Hawthorne had published some years earlier. Indeed, the Virginian dared to compare Hawthorne to Shakespeare! 

            But the essay also blazoned the coming of American literary greatness, asserting the youthful vitality, the native originality, and the indisputable universality of the distinctly American literature that was just then claiming the world’s attention (Emerson had published “Nature” in 1836, “The American Scholar” in 1837, “The Poet” in 1844; Thoreau’s A Week . . . appeared in 1849, and Walden was only four years away; Dickinson’s first published poem showed up, though anonymously, in 1850; and the first edition of Whitman’s Leaves of Grass in 1855): “Believe me, my friends,” boasts the Virginian, “that Shakespeares are this day being born on the banks of the Ohio.”

            The Virginian was Herman Melville, who had only recently met the considerably older Hawthorne and who, though only for a few years, would enjoy a close personal and artistic relationship with Hawthorne and Hawthorne’s wife Sophia. The Scarlet Letter had been published in the spring of 1850, and although Melville barely mentions it in “Hawthorne and His Mosses,” he knew that the tale of Salem, MA in 1692 was a distinctly American achievement.

            Melville’s essay, however, reflects—though without explicitly mentioning—Melville’s own hopes for (and anxieties about) the novel that he was working on at the time, Moby-Dick, which appeared slightly over a year after “Hawthorne and His Mosses” and was “Inscribed” to Hawthorne. In the essay, Melville invokes Shakespeare again: “This, too, I mean: that if Shakespeare has not been equalled [sic], he is sure to be surpassed by an American born now, or yet to be born.” Melville leaves little doubt that he thinks of himself as that “American born now”; and historically it is unquestionable that the creature being born is Moby-Dick, the novel originally titled The Whale.

            This course proposes an in-depth study of three interrelated subjects: 1) the importance of Melville’s essay in American literary history; 2) the relationship—more the literary than the personal—between Melville and Hawthorne; 3) the thematic and cultural connections (and divergences) between the two great novels. We will also take into account several thematic offshoots of these three subjects—for example, the Americanness of the novels; the ideas of literary success and failure; the notion of literary fame; the relation between democracy and high literary art (complemented by the relation between capitalism and high literary art), the American abroad (Melville among “cannibals,” for example) in relation to the American at home (Hawthorne was born in and wrote about Salem). In addition to The Scarlet Letter and Moby-Dick, we will read representative (and in Melville’s case also shorter) works: from Hawthorne, “The Minister’s Black Veil,” “The Birthmark,” “Young Goodman Brown,” “The Dustan Family,” “The Maypole of Merry-Mount,” and others; from Melville: his first novel, Typee, selections from The Piazza Tales, Benito Cereno, “Bartleby the Scrivener,” and others.

            Attendance, engaged discussion, a serious multi-modal presentation, and, not least, the indispensable passion to make the course not just successful but memorable.

ENG 495: Honors Seminar
British Poetry: From Snipe to Soul, or how Satire got Romantic
Instructor: Michael Genovese
001: MWF 10-10:50

At the end of the 1600s and beginning of the 1700s, British poets delved into the darkness.  Excelling at tawdry sexual lyrics and rhymes that mocked the elite and common alike, these poets wrote little that resembles the introspective, emotional poetry that developed a hundred years later and still dominates stereotypes about poetic expression.  So what exactly happened, and is there even a way to answer that question?  To approach this issue, we will begin with the satires and bawdy couplets of the 1680s-1720s and continue on to the Romantic poetry of the 1790s-1820s, pausing along the way to examine how attitudes towards poetry and consideration of the well-examined life shifted in the intervening decades.  Out of a genre of writing that excelled in snipe eventually arose the pre-eminent genre for examining one’s soul, and in this class we will test whether there is any family resemblance between poetic traditions that look so different.  Authors will include Rochester, Behn, Pope, Swift, Duck, Wordsworth, Shelley, Barbauld, Young, Smith, and numerous others.  Students should be prepared to read anywhere from 1 to 4 poems per day, depending on their lengths, and there will be 2-3 page analytical papers throughout the semester as well as a longer, final paper.

ENG 507: Advanced Workshop in Imaginative Writing

001: CANCELLED

Fiction
Instructor: Andrew Ewell
002: W 4-6:30

This is a workshop for experienced fiction writers. You’ll develop your craft by producing several original compositions, refine your reading practices and hone your critical skills through peer critique and discussion, and develop a course of independent reading to help contextualize and reinforce your artistic ambitions. If you believe, as all serious writers do, that “the pleasures of writing correspond exactly to the pleasures of reading” (Vladimir Nabokov), and if you aim to make art that “clarifies life” (John Gardner), then this course is for you.

Poetry
Instructor: Julia Johnson
003: R 4-6:30

This is the advanced poetry workshop and it may be repeated for credit.  Our class meetings will be an intense gathering of poets dedicated to polishing strong portfolios of work. We will leave our comfort zones. This class is devoted to poetry by you and by others. It is a workshop-based class. We will together access and read an extensive amount of work by contemporary poets, with a particular focus on poetic forms. The class needs its participants to be active. What you don’t ask, formulate, present, question, interrogate, assert, or wonder aloud, etc. will remain forever in the empty cavern of your heart.

Autobiography
Instructor: Gurney Norman
004: T 5-7:30

The premise of this course in autobiographical writing is that every person has stories to tell about her or his experiences of life. It is assumed that each member of the class is self-motivated to write his or her individual life-stories. Many will want to write their stories from deep personal need as part of their journey of self-discovery. Others will be more interested in making a record of their lives and thoughts for future use in a book-length autobiography, and for use by family members as part of the family’s collective memory. Perhaps the writer will simply want to record long-held feelings, emotions, facts, secrets and other forms of self-expression. Regardless of motive, the basic task for each student writer is to produce 7-10 standard manuscript pages per week for a total of at least eighty pages. Students should feel free to write more than these minimum pages during the semester.  Beyond the required eighty pages there are no restrictions on length or subject matter. The Instructor will respond to the work of each individual through written comments, individual conferences and spoken comments during the class meetings. Fellow students are invited to offer suggestions and themselves take turns reading aloud passages of their writing to the assembled class members. A premise of the course is that students are serious people who think deeply about their lives and may very well one day write and publish serious books. English 507 Autobiography is a step toward that end.

 
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