Graduate Courses

 

SPRING 2023

ENG 607 001 Graduate Writing Workshop: Fiction
W 3:30 PM-6:00 PM
Andrew Milward 

This is a graduate level course in fiction writing open only to MFA students. The class will follow the workshop model, and therefore student work, and the intensive discussion of same, will be our main focus; however, we will supplement this with careful study of professional writers and/or craft essays. Students will be required to share at least two new pieces, as well as a revision and a paper about the revision process.  
 
ENG 607 002 Graduate Writing Workshop: Poetry
M 2:00 PM-4:30 PM
Julia Johnson

Course description forthcoming.
 
ENG 607 003 Graduate Writing Workshop: CNF
F 2:00 PM-4:30 PM
Erik Reece

Course description forthcoming.
 
ENG 608 001 The Craft of Writing: Digital Spaces
M 5:00 PM-7:30 PM
DaMaris Hill

Course description forthcoming.
 
ENG 611 001 Literature Teaching Seminar
R 5:00 PM-7:30 PM
Emily Shortslef

Course description forthcoming.
 
ENG 722 001 Seminar in Renaissance Studies: Shakespeare's Rome
TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM
Joyce MacDonald

Course description forthcoming.
 
ENG 738 001 Seminar in Victorian Literature
R 2:00-PM 4:30 PM
Jill Rappoport

Course description forthcoming.
 
ENG 751 001 Seminar in Amer Lit: 1800-1860
TR 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Andy Doolen

Course description forthcoming.
 
ENG 753 001 Seminar in Amer Lit Since 1900
T 5:00 PM-7:30 PM
Michael Trask

Course description forthcoming.
 
ENG 781 001 Seminar in Film: Teaching Film
M 2:00 PM-4:30 PM
Alan Nadel

Course description forthcoming.






 
 

FALL 2022

ENG 601 001 ESSAYS & CREATIVE NONFICTION
F 2:30 PM-5:00 PM
Erik Reece

Not quite a creative writing workshop, not quite a literature seminar, this 12-week class (we’ll be done before Thanksgiving) will focus on a particular genre of nonfiction writing, the literary essay--essays written about or responding to literature and film. We’ll look at integrating cultural critique, literary criticism, film criticism, autobiographical and biographical writing, hybrid and braided forms. Each student will write a “intellectual autobiography,” along with two other pieces. Our principle texts will come from two of this country’s greatest literary essayists, Guy Davenport and Cynthia Ozick.  


ENG 607 001 GRAD WRTNG WKSHP: Fiction
M 2:00 PM-4:30 PM
DaMaris Hill

This MFA Fiction Workshop is an intensive workshop for MFA fiction students and others. This creative writing workshop explores fiction writing and literary craft. This workshop will introduce/reintroduce writers to some of the various elements of fiction writing. In addition to the elements of fiction, our workshop will consider how craft and content collide in prose works. In addition, this workshop will explore narrative theories that are evident in traditional and contemporary fiction. Therefore, some twenty-first century writers and narrative arts associated with contemporary literary writing will be discussed. The course will also challenge writers to critique and create fiction and prose writings. This course will focus on short fiction forms, but writers engaging in longer prose forms like novels and memoir will benefit from this workshop.  Traditional forms and experimentation are welcome.


ENG 607 002 GRAD WRTNG WKSHP: Poetry
M 2:00 PM-4:30 PM
Frank Walker

Course description forthcoming.


ENG 607 003 GRAD WRTNG WKSHP: CNF
W 3:30 PM-6:00 PM
Andrew Milward

This is a graduate level course in creative nonfiction writing open only to MFA students. The class will follow the workshop model, and therefore student work, and the intensive discussion of same, will be our main focus; however, we will supplement this with careful study of professional writers and/or craft essays. Students will be required to share at least two new pieces, as well as a revision and a paper about the revision process.  

ENG 608 001 CRAFT OF WRITING: Ekphrastic Writing
M 5:00 PM-7:30 PM
Erik Reece

The oldest human paintings we know of, those in the caves at Lascaux, France, are about 12,000 years older than the first written language. But at least since the time of Homer’s description of Achilles’ shield in the Iliad, poets and writers have been describing (ekphrasis) works of art. In this course we will examine a great variety of writerly responses to visual art. We will look at the three genres of fiction, nonfiction and poetry, and we will consider many sub-genres within those forms. These will include autobiography, criticism, prose poems, lyric essays, short stories, novels, persona poems, and more. The UK Art Museum will be our home base for these writerly explorations. We will create ekphrastic responses to visual art that are personal, political, cultural, hermeneutical, biographical, speculative and more.  


ENG 651 001 STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1860: Aesthetics & Politics
R 5:00 PM-7:30 PM
Michelle Sizemore

This seminar joins aesthetics and political theory in an investigation of democracy across the long nineteenth century. Throughout the semester, we will ask how aesthetics and politics are mutually constitutive, paying special attention to the role of form, feeling, and fiction in the ideation of democratic concepts and institutions. We will approach familiar ideas such as citizenship, popular sovereignty, and “the people” in surprising ways and tour unexpected terrain such as political theology, democratic taste, and democratic feelings. While we will explore an array of topics over sixteen weeks, our discussions will build on the same broad set of questions: What are democracy’s forms and fictions? What are the political dimensions of emotions? How are aesthetics deployed in times of crisis? What can the study of form, feeling, imagination, pleasure, and taste offer to the study of race, racism, and racial reckoning? It is worth emphasizing that this is an interdisciplinary course; a considerable portion of our readings will come from fields and disciplines that inform literary studies, including political theory, aesthetic theory, affect theory, feminist and queer theory, and critical race theory. Writers may include Charles Brockden Brown, Catharine Sedgwick, Alexis DeTocqueville, John Neal, Victor Sejour, Edgar Allan Poe, Maria Cummins, William Wells Brown, Elizabeth Keckley, Louisa May Alcott, Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, and more.


ENG 700 001 TUTORIAL FOR PHD CANDIDATES
R 2:00 PM-4:30 PM
Marion Rust

Course description forthcoming.


ENG 730 001 SEMINAR IN 18TH CENTURY LITERATURE
T 2:00
Michael Genovese

Course description forthcoming.


ENG 753 001 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1900
T 2:00 PM-4:30 PM 
Jeff Clymer

In this seminar, we will study key twentieth-century US literary texts within the historical and theoretical paradigm known as “Critical Finance Studies.” Also sometimes called the “New History of Capitalism,” current work at the nexus of literature and economics explores the roles that credit, debt, and risk have played in American literary and social history. We will range in this class from early-twentieth century anxieties about speculation and bankers’ secret control of the economy to the outpouring of recent literature after the 2008 financial crisis that grappled with the increasing abstraction of finance and its resultant inequities in society. No advanced understanding of finance or economics is required – only an interest in how authors represented the social effects of money’s fascinating circulation in the United States.  Reading list will include works such as Frank Norris, The Pit; Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth; Theodore Dreiser, The Financier; Edwin Lefèvre, Wall Street Stories; Jonathan Dee, The Privileges; Don DeLillo, Cosmopolis; and Robert Harris, The Fear Index, as well as theorists and historians of modern capitalism.  


ENG 771 001 SEMINAR IN SPECIAL TOPICS: Contemporary African American Literature
R 2:00 PM-4:30 PM
Regina Hamilton-Townsend

Contemporary African American literature often includes texts published as far back as the 1970s and 1980s. In this course I am going to shrink this timetable to only include African American literature published in the twenty-first century. Interestingly, that still gives us twenty(two) years of novels, movies, music, and video games to engage in this course. Though every era is intimately connected to the one before, maybe through the forms, settings, and characters central to twenty-first black media, we can begin to consider some of the distinct contours of a twenty-first century version of black aesthetics. Are there now true differences between the issues and/or discursive responses of twentieth and twenty-first century black Americans? My hope is that through critically engaging texts, movies, and music by Jesmyn Ward, Kiese Laymon, Rivers Solomon, Colson Whitehead, Janelle Monae, Jordan Peele, and others, we might begin to answer that question. In addition, to help frame our discussions of contemporary black cultural productions, we will also read theoretical texts from within Black Studies that were published during this same twenty-year period. Hopefully, these theoretical texts will give us the necessary vocabulary and the necessary context to critique any patterns we might find.  


ENG 781 001 SEMINAR IN FILM: Third Cinema to Global South Cinema
TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM
Kamahra Ewing

Course description forthcoming.