Fall Courses

Fall 2022 Courses

For Undergraduate Curriculum click here.

For specific schedules and section numbers, please see the schedule on myuk.uky.edu. 

More course descriptions are coming soon!

 

 

ENG 100 ORIENTATION TO THE ENGLISH MAJOR
Michelle Sizemore
T 11:00

This course serves as an orientation to the benefits and requirements of majoring in English. You will learn about multiple fields, including American literature, African American literature, British literature, Creative Writing, and Film. You will meet professors, learn how to earn honors and do internships in English, hear about fellowships and study abroad opportunities, and discover different careers for English majors. You will get to know fellow English majors and have the chance to get involved with extra-curricular activities in the English Department. In addition to providing practical know-how, this class raises philosophical and conceptual questions for our consideration and discussion throughout the semester. How can you make the most of your college experience? Why is it important to study language, literature, and the humanities? How will the English major prepare you for life and a career in the 21st century? This class will put you on a track to excel and get the most out of your major. 1 credit hour Pass/Fail.

ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Crystal Wilkinson
MW 1:00, F varies

This course is an introduction to the craft of creative writing and three of its genres: fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Students will study and practice writing in various modes along with peer critique. This is primarily a lecture class which fulfills the UK Core requirement for Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity.  This course fulfills ENG pre-major requirement and provides ENG minor credit. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Frank X Walker
MW 11:00, F varies

ENG 107 is designed to offer an introduction to the genres and craft of imaginative writing, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will study, practice and discuss writing in various modes through composition, peer critique, and research. This is an introductory course in creative writing for the novice. Participants will examine, discuss and put into practice how poetry and prose can communicate and express ideas and emotions. Classes will consist of large lectures and break out discussion groups. Regular attendance, crafting, and reviews will be required in smaller groups. Some sessions will occur on-line. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE  WRITING
DaMaris Hill
MW 12:00, F varies

Writing Craft: Introduction to Imaginative Writing is an introduction to the genres and craft of creative writing, including fiction, nonfiction, poetry etc. Students will study and practice writing in various modes through composition, peer critique, and research. During our class times, we will meet to consider the ways creative writing is expressed in varied genres. The course will challenge students to critique and create writing in many different genres. The course will also discuss how and why authors choose to express themselves using different genres and hybrid texts. This course offers credit for the UK Core requirement in Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity. This course fulfills ENG pre-major requirement and provides ENG minor credit. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Michael Carter
MW 10:00, F varies

This introductory course in creative writing will explore the various genre: we will play with poetry, fiddle with fiction and nonfiction, as well as grace our souls with other genre. The class will read and discuss literature in various delightful forms to help us understand technique and voice, and practice writing and critiquing our own writing. We will often work in small groups (depending on the number enrolled) as a workshopping method for finding our voices as writers, and for helping our classmates find theirs. By the semester’s end, we will have a mini portfolio of writing. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 130 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Strange Detectives        
Caitlin Coulter
MWF 2:00
MWF 3:00

Light your pipe and grab your gat—we’ve got a mystery to uncover! Detective Fiction has long been thought of as the stomping grounds of the white male detective, the private dick who boasts a sardonic voice and quick-wit. But while this original figure is important and iconic, there are many other players who have been relegated to the back alleys of the literary world, and it’s time that we looked into the crime.This course will focus on the various perspectives that the genre of American Detective Fiction presents and use our own projects to amplify the voices that are all too often silenced in the shadow of the traditional white male detective. Specifically, we will be looking at the profile of the detective, where tradition began, and how tradition is held in tension with contemporary versions, contemporary authors, and contemporary criminals! Although this course will include a formal writing assignment, and shorter writing exercises throughout the semester, we will also use multi-media formats and responses to explore the works of Black, Chicana/o, female, and queer authors. We will learn to read scholarship and novels side-by-side and organize our responses in useful and personally relevant ways. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 130 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Black Futures   
Adam Quinn
TR 9:30
TR 11:00

Since 2017, artist Alisha B. Wormsley has been installing billboards in cities across the world that simply read, “There Are Black People in the Future.”  Some cities have criticized the billboards or even taken them down for being too controversial, leading us to ask why imagining a future for Black people is perceived to be so dangerous—or so powerful. Black writers since at least the nineteenth century have been imagining Black futures beyond white supremacy and structural racism, from Black nationalists to Afrofuturists. Sometimes these Black futures are hopeful, as in Ta-Nehisi Coates’ and Roxane Gay’s recent Black Panther run, and sometimes they are bleak, as in Colson Whitehead’s zombie novel Zone One. But the project of imagining alternative meanings of Blackness has been a consistent theme in Black literary history, from canonical figures such as W.E.B. DuBois and Octavia Butler to contemporary writers such as N.K. Jemisin. This class will ask you to analyze these key texts, make connections between them, and dare to imagine your own Black futures.. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 142 GLOBAL SHAKESPEARE
Fred Bengtsson
TR 9:30
TR 11:00

Global Shakespeare will expose students to selected productions and adaptations of Shakespeare's plays by authors and acting companies from Asia, the Middle East, Africa, the Americas, and from European nations other than Great Britain. In our globally connected age, Shakespeare has crossed borders, occupying an honored place in the school curricula and cultural aspirations of many formerly colonized nations. In a post- colonial age, he has become the medium through which multiple cultures articulate their own values and enter into equal intellectual and aesthetic exchange with the English-speaking west. Students in the course will be asked to ponder what there is about Shakespeare that makes his plays such rich raw material for these encounters and exchanges. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 180 GREAT MOVIES: Stories We Love
Matthew Godbey
MW 12:00, F varies

A course introducing students to films of various genres and styles, from both historical and contemporary filmmakers, investigating a particular issue or theme. Topics vary by semester and are chosen by faculty to give a broad-based understanding of important cinematic works, trends, and the creative processes behind this important, collaborative artform. As with all Arts and Creativity classes, this class will require students to produce an artistic artifact. Intended as a general humanities course for non-majors. Lecture and section. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or provide ENG Major Elective credit. Fulfills the UK Core requirement in Arts and Creativity. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 180 GREAT MOVIES: Cheap Thrills: Low Budget Hits
B Bailey
MWF 1:00
MWF 2:00

In this course we will look at low budget films that broke the box office, created stars, and/ or changed the genre. Throughout the semester you will learn how to analyze films of different genres, discuss film concepts, basic terms and how to employ them in creative work and analysis, while also enjoying films that I classify as “must see” in their genres. We will watch independent low budget horror, drama, action, and comedy films. Each film is historically or culturally notable and was praised by audiences and critics alike. In this course you will be familiarized with popular genres through potentially unfamiliar films and gain insight into the varieties of experiences and perspectives present in film. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 207 BEGINNING WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING: Poetry   
Alfonso Zapata
MWF 10:00

A beginning workshop in the craft of writing, teaching students how to read critically and how to revise work in progress. The students provide an audience for each others' work. Exercises involve practice in aspects of craft and promote experimentation with different forms, subjects, and approaches; outside reading provides models and inspiration. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Required for ENG Creative Writing Option.

ENG 207 BEGINNING WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING: Creative Nonfiction
Clay Shields
MWF 10:00

A beginning workshop in the craft of writing, teaching students how to read critically and how to revise work in progress. The students provide an audience for each others' work. Exercises involve practice in aspects of craft and promote experimentation with different forms, subjects, and approaches; outside reading provides models and inspiration. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Required for ENG Creative Writing Option.

ENG 207 BEGINNING WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING: Fiction
Henry Knollenberg
MWF 9:00

A beginning workshop in the craft of writing, teaching students how to read critically and how to revise work in progress. The students provide an audience for each others' work. Exercises involve practice in aspects of craft and promote experimentation with different forms, subjects, and approaches; outside reading provides models and inspiration. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Required for ENG Creative Writing Option.

ENG 207 BEGINNING WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING: Fiction
Kasimma
TR 9:30

This course is a beginning workshop in the craft of writing. Here, we will learn how to bond with stories and storytelling. Students will learn how to read stories critically and how to revise their drafts. The students provide an audience for each other’s work. Exercises involve practice in aspects of craft and promote experimentation with different forms, subjects, and approaches; outside reading provides models and inspiration. We will study the works of professionals. This course is a workshop course, which means we will be discussing stories written by members of this class. To that end, you are obliged to produce a minimum of two original stories and two revised versions of these stories, which will serve as your final portfolio. Attendance, participation, critique letters, and reading responses are mandatory throughout our time together this semester. 

ENG 230 INTRO TO LITERATURE: Literature & Money
Michael Genovese
MWF 9:00
 

In this course we will explore literature that obsesses over economic concerns such as production and consumption, money and goods, hoarding and spending. The last few years have reminded us of the economic power of irrational exuberance, and the painful fall that follows it.  But our financial enthusiasm is not just about greed; money sparks the imagination, setting it in motion toward all sorts of goals. Yet rarely do we pause to consider the cultural complexity that allows us to trade pieces of paper for a cup of coffee, or use a plastic card to decorate a room. Economic models may explain this behavior to us with graphs and equations, but we experience these transactions much more immediately and respond to them passionately. A sofa, a poster, a new television all come to us through money, but they appeal to us because of what we imagine they can offer once we get them home. We write our own narratives of money every day, and the study of literature offers an opportunity to reflect upon the role of the imagination in economic life.

Money asks us to trust its promise of value, and novels, poems, and dramas do the same when they ask us to embrace their fictions. Someone hands us a check for $100, and we gleefully envision how that paper might become a night on the town, a new piece of furniture, or the latest software. In a similar way, literature works on our imaginations to construct worlds out of paper.  We never actually meet fictional characters or go where they go, but we feel that we know them and travel alongside them as we read a novel or poem. In this course, we will explore the fantasies that authors specifically build around the pursuit and use of money, and the economic harshness they often reveal.  Studying works from the Renaissance to the modernist period, we will try to identify what role literature has played in shaping our economic imagination. This seminar won’t make us better at budgeting, but by the end of the semester we will have a better understanding of the narratives we write around every dollar earned and spent. UK Core: Inquiry in the Humanities

ENG 230 INTRO TO LITERATURE: Introduction to U.S. Minority Literature
Geronimo Sarmiento Cruz
MWF 11:00 - Restricted to incoming English majors
MWF 12:00 - Restricted to incoming English majors

An introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics indicated in the subtitle. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings with different subtitles each semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. UK Core: Inquiry in the Humanities

ENG 230 INTRO TO LITERATURE: Memory and Loss
Fred Bengtsson
TR 2:00
 
An introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics indicated in the subtitle. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings with different subtitles each semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. UK Core: Inquiry in the Humanities

ENG 241 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I
Joyce M. MacDonald
TR 11:00

English 241 is a survey of the development of British (not just “English”) literature from its beginnings through the early seventeenth century. Obviously, we will not be able to cover all literary developments in a period of more than a thousand years in equal depth. Instead, the course will have four major goals: 1)To give students an overview of the major modes of writing, significant texts, and important authors in the English language over this long period; 2) To trace a history of the development of the English language over time; 3) To help students build a critical vocabulary for discussing and analyzing pre-modern literature; 4)To introduce students to important research tools for studying and writing about literature. ENG 241 counts toward the survey requirement for the English major and may fulfill other requirements for other majors in and out of Arts and Sciences. 

ENG 251 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I
Jeff Clymer
TR 11:00

This course is an immersion in the literature and cultural history of the United States before the Civil War.  We will read a diverse array of famous and currently lesser-known significant authors in a variety of genres (novel, short story, essay, poetry) as we seek to understand their works within a roiling historical milieu defined by rapid economic change, slavery, and debates over women’s rights. The last several weeks of the term will be devoted to the stunning outpouring of work produced by American writers, including Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Poe, Stowe, Dickinson, and Jacobs, in the middle decades of the nineteenth century. Grade will be determined by a combination of short essays and in-class exams.

ENG 251 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I
Instructor TBD
MWF 1:00

A survey of American literature from its colonial origins to the Civil War, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the American Colonies and antebellum United States. The course explores both the social conditions in which authors lived and wrote, such as conflicts over land with Native Americans, slavery, and the emergence of women's rights as well as the key developments in literary form during this period, such as the rise of the novel, the slave narrative, and the changing shape of poetry. Texts and authors covered may include Susanna Rowson, Herman Melville's Moby Dick, Frederick Douglass' Narrative, short stories by Edgar Allan Poe, the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, and more. Lecture or Lecture with discussion. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement and Early Period requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 334.

ENG 260 INTRODUCTION TO BLACK WRITERS
Nazera Wright
Online Asynchronous

n introduction to written and oral works by Black authors of Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. The course includes writers such as Chinua Achebe (Africa), Wilson Harris (Caribbean), and Toni Morrison (USA), as well as others from the diverse field of literature written by African-American authors and authors of color worldwide. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 264. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities

ENG 265 SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE
Andy Doolen
TR 12:30

A survey of African-American literature from the mid-eighteenth century to Reconstruction and after, with emphasis on selected genres, periods, and thematic characteristics of the early African-American cultural and literary experience. Topics include colonialism and abolitionism; early black aesthetics, narratives of enslavement, and drama, novels, and poetry. Authors may include Jupiter Hammon, Phillis Wheatley, William Wells Brown, George Moses Horton, Martin Delaney, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, Ellen Craft, and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. A&S Race & Ethnicity Requirement

ENG 280 INTRO TO FILM
Pearl James
MWF 1:00, F varies

An introduction to the study of films as narrative art and cultural documents. The course involves viewing and analyzing films from different genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to view films closely, how to relate films to their contexts, and how to employ the basic terms and concepts of film analysis. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. Viewing films outside of class is required. We will ask: How do films tell stories and convey meaning? What kinds of visual and narrative impact do different aspects of the medium—color, sound, lighting, character, and so on—have on our impressions, emotions, and understanding? Beginning with these formal questions, we will develop a common vocabulary for analyzing films.  We will study films from a range of periods, nations, and genres and consider how the art of filmmaking has changed over time.  We will go on to ask cultural questions, including the one posed by critic David Denby: “Do movies have a future?” Do recent changes in how movies are delivered (digitally) and marketed (globally) threaten the tradition of film as an artform? Are films status as financial commodities degrading their value as art? Note: section 005 is reserved for students in the Lewis Honors College. UK Core: Inquiry in the Humanities

ENG 290 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S LITERATURE
Kimaya Thakur
TR 11:00
TR 12:30

Non-conforming, freethinking, rebellious, female-identifying artists (authors/creators) are often regarded as either “difficult” or “troublemakers,” and in some rare cases, “revolutionaries.” This course focuses on such female-identifying artists who rebel, revolt, resist, and/or “don’t play nice,” to give voice to—and speak or act against—injustices, atrocities, inequalities, to effect positive change and make the world a better place for others like them. This course focuses on “texts” (novels, poetry, songs, etc.) created by such “difficult” female-identifying artists who are, in fact, Rebels with a Cause, who either rebel “against” conventions/discriminations (of sexuality, race, culture, etc.), or rebel “for” inclusion, diversity, and representation. Reading (and/or viewing) materials will be diverse, and include such texts as Maya Angelou’s I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, Joy Harjo’s An American Sunrise (the song as well as the book of poetry), Elizabeth Acevedo’s The Poet X, Mona Haydar’s songs “Barbarian” and “Wrap My Hijab (Hijabi),” selected readings from Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist, etc. . UK Core: Inquiry in the Humanities

ENG 307 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING: Very Short Fictions, Massive Imaginations
Andrew Milward
M 3:00

In this course we will be reading and writing stories that aim to far outlast their brief time on the page: flash fiction, micro fiction, Twitterature. We will examine each of these very short forms, as well as few novels composed of flash fictions. Students can expect to rigorously read and respond to professional works while also composing their own very short fictions that will be workshopped by the class. Selected texts may include We the Animals, The House on Mango Street, Mrs. Bridge, Brevity: A Flash Fiction Handbook, Flash Fiction: 72 Very Short Stories, Best Microfiction 2021, and New Micro: Exceptionally Short Fiction.     

ENG 330 TEXT AND CONTEXT: Native American Voices in Context
Andy Doolen
TR 9:30

The core course in the English Major focusing on the close reading and analysis of a single major literary text, or a focused set of texts, in historical and critical context. Students will develop analytical and interpretive skills that deepen their historical and conceptual understanding of literature, as well as their skills of critical reading, writing, and presentation. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. ENG major and minor requirement. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours under different subtitles. Credit from this course applies to the following programs: Undergraduate.

ENG 330 TEXT AND CONTEXT: Robinson Crusoe 
Michael Genovese
MWF 11:00

Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, published in 1719, is widely regarded as the first novel.  In many ways, it gave birth to prose fiction as we still know it today: as a story that takes place in a familiar, realistic world occupied by people doing things we recognize as everyday.  But what is familiar?  Realistic?  Everyday?  Are people and characters even the same thing?  As we study Defoe’s novel, we will stretch into its literary past and future in order to explore these questions and come to terms with what it meant to be the “first” novel and what it still means to be a novel today.  We will read novels by Defoe as well as works selected from the following novelists: Bunyan, Haywood, Coetzee, and Joyce.  There will also be regular reading of critical and theoretical essays related these novels.  Expect approximately 120 pages of reading per week, as well as about 20 pages of writing.  Active participation is required, and there will be a cumulative final exam.  
ENG 330 TEXT AND CONTEXT: Othello and its Afterlife
Joyce McDonald
TR 2:00

First performed in 1604, Shakespeare’s Othello has rarely been off the stage since. A heartbreaking tragedy of romantic love and betrayed innocence, it soon emerged as one of the central documents in the west’s formulation of ideas about racial identity and difference. Its early presentation of an interracial marriage has fed fantasies and fears about the links between sex, gender, and race since the moment of its appearance, and it has generated a rich afterlife of plays and films inspired by its story, the power of its poetry, and its undeniable emotional impact. In this section of 330, we’ll read Shakespeare’s play alongside a selection of works it inspired and informed, from films like O and All Night Long, to plays like Red Velvet—a dramatization of the career of Ira Aldridge, first black American actor to play Othello in England—and Toni Morrison’s Desdemona. What are the sources of Othello’s hold over us? How has it been used by generations after Shakespeare to talk about sexuality, black masculinity, and white womanhood? How can contemporary audiences continue to find themselves in it? 
ENG 333 LITERATURE IN THE DIGITAL AGE: Narratives, Race, and Digital Studies
Regina Hamilton
TR 12:30

Literature has found new platforms in the digital age. E-books, digital archives, electronic literature, audio books, podcasts, born-digital fiction, interactive fiction, and other digital literary forms have diversified the media for stories and altered traditional understandings of literature. This course will explore one or more forms of digital literature, introducing students to the principal theories and questions of this growing field. The course may examine subjects such as storytelling, active reading, hypertext, collaborative authorship, editing, publishing, digital aesthetics, poetry, and more.

ENG 339 AUTHOR STUDIES: Orwell
Peter Kalliney
TR 9:30

What makes George Orwell such a compelling writer, now?  Is it his deceptively plain style, his willingness to speak out against hypocrisy, his stubborn belief in democratic socialism?  Even as the major political concerns that animate his writing have passed into history--the Spanish Civil War, fascism, totalitarianism, European imperialism, the Cold War--his writings somehow retain their ability to speak to contemporary audiences.  In this course, we will think about these questions as we read a range of Orwell's writing: novels, documentaries, political essays, ethnographic writing, war reporting, and book reviews.  Highlights will include Down and Out in Paris and London, "Politics and the English Language," and 1984.

ENG 342 SHAKESPEARE
Emily Shortslef
TR 12:30

An introductory survey of Shakespeare’s plays with a thematic focus on complicated relationships (between friends, family, lovers, enemies, and strangers). We’ll explore acts of trust, betrayal, and forgiveness, kindness and cruelty, in plays that span Shakespeare’s career and cover the range of dramatic genres in which he wrote. At the same time, we’ll examine how Shakespeare’s use of language (especially figurative language) creates meaning; discuss the theatrical cultures and social worlds in which these plays were written and have been performed; and think about the exciting interpretive possibilities of performance—all questions having to do with the relationship these plays have with their audiences, in Shakespeare’s time and now. This course will introduce students to Shakespeare’s work in its historical and dramatic contexts; foster the development of a critical vocabulary and set of strategies for analyzing complex texts; and help students to develop close reading and critical writing skills. Assignments will include short papers and a final exam. 

ENG 349 MODERNISM
Peter Kalliney
TR 12:30

What is the avant-garde, or what constitutes an avant-garde group? Why did a number of avant-garde cultural movements erupt--and often fizzle out just as quickly--during the first half of the twentieth century? Is there any relationship between an avant-garde and armed conflict, as the above definitions suggest--is the historical proximity of two world wars and so many revolutionary movements in the arts merely coincidental? In this honors seminar, we will use these questions to guide us through a variety of complex experiments in the arts during the modernist period. Examining a wide range of distinct avant-garde "moments"--including Futurism, Vorticism, Cubism, Dadaism, the Harlem Renaissance, Surrealism, and Négritude--throughout the semester, we will see if there exist any common themes between them. What stands out is not only the incredible (and sometimes confusing) diversity of avant-garde movements themselves, but also the range of media in which they worked: literature, painting, sculpture, music, dance, film, architecture, and design were all transformed by avant-garde practitioners during the past century. 
ENG 357 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE
MW 3:00
Michael Trask

This class will examine American fiction and poetry from 1980 to the present.  We’ll be guided by the diverse categories through which contemporary literature’s critics and readers have sought to identify it: minimalism, hyperrealism, postmodernism, cyberpunk, magic realism. The class will be especially interested in developing a vocabulary and method of interpretation for approaching work by writers of diverse genres, from science fiction to historical novels to environmental poetry. Readings will include Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping; William Gibson, Neuromancer; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Colson Whitehead, The Intuitionist; Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake; Juliana Spahr, Well Then There Now; Nicky Finney, Head Off and Split; George Saunders, Tenth of December; Tao Lin, Tai Pei; Sara Levine, Treasure Island!!!

ENG 384 LITERATURE AND FILM
TR 2:00
Emily Shortslef

Few writers have had their work adapted for the screen as frequently as Shakespeare. In this class we’ll read five Shakespearean plays alongside some of their many film versions. What are the different ways in which filmmakers translate 400-year- old texts into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? How does film compare to theatrical drama as a medium? What does it mean to “adapt” a play? Why does Shakespeare continue to be relevant to contemporary filmmakers and audiences? This course will introduce students to Shakespeare’s work in its historical and dramatic contexts; foster the development of a critical vocabulary and set of strategies for analyzing drama and film; and help students to develop close reading and critical writing skills. Assignments will include short papers and a final exam. 

ENG 407 INTERMEDIATE WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING: Artistry of Storytelling (fiction)
TR 3:30
Kasimma

Imagine a plain brown clay pot. Imagine taking it to an artist who draws beautiful designs on it and returns a stunning, decorated flower vase to you. That is what ENG 407 is about: improving upon the knowledge you garnered in ENG 207. Our target in this course is to sharpen your artistry of storytelling, focusing on fiction written by professional writers and yourselves. We want you walking into Christmas, not only with a colorful flower vase, with the skills to break the rules of the art and couple it back into something sharper, prettier. My sincere hope is that at the end of this course, you will become a potter of stories. You must, at least, have a pot! This course is intended for those who did well in ENG 207 (Beginning Workshop in Fiction Writing). I assume that you are no longer a beginner in the art of writing. You should know the basic rules for coupling a work of fiction together. Over the course of the semester, we will advance to coloring your writing skills, enhancing what you already know about fiction writing, and teaching you the many roads to the destination of artistic storytelling. We will study the works of professionals. This course is a workshop course, which means we will be discussing stories written by members of this class. To that end, you are obliged to produce a minimum of two original stories and two revised versions of these stories, which will serve as your final portfolio. Attendance, participation, critique letters, and reading responses are mandatory throughout our time together this semester. 

ENG 407 INTERMEDIATE WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING: Personal Stories (creative nonfiction)
R 3:30
Gurney Norman

This is a combined intermediate/advanced workshop in creative writing focused on creative nonfiction. Creative nonfiction is a broadly inclusive term that refers to various forms of prose writing including, but not limited to, personal narrative, memoir, essays, and literary journalism. As nonfiction, the work is connected to some “true” event or actual state of affairs that exists. John McPhee describes creative nonfiction as “not making something up but making the most of what you have.” From your choice of subject to your prose style, you are invited to bring your own individual voice and creative vision to the story. The course theme of “Personal Stories” is intended to recognize our natural storytelling ability, see everyday life and experience as worthy of literary attention, and encourage each of us to relax into our own unique voice as writers.

ENG 407 INTERMEDIATE WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING: Poetic Forms (poetry)
TR 2:00
Julia Johnson

Continued studies in the writer's craft, focusing on student work but with increased emphasis on outside reading. Areas of workshop practice include Poetry, Fiction, and Creative Non-Fiction. Prerequisite ENG 207 in the same genre or consent of instructor. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Can count only once for ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Required for ENG Creative Writing Option.

ENG 407 INTERMEDIATE WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING: Who’s Listening (screenwriting)
TR 12:30
Hannah Pittard

This is generative workshop in intermediate screenwriting. There will be weekly reading and writing assignments. Writing assignments will be in response to particular prompts. Students will be required to purchase a software package (Final Draft) costing approximately $100 for use in this class. 

ENG 425 ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING
MWF 11:00
MWF 1:00
Michael Carter

Fiction, non-fiction, poetry and many other artistic genres have taken us to task in our treatment of the environment we humans share with all life. Whether James Fenimore Cooper in The Pioneers showing the destruction in the town of Templeton of a flock of passenger pigeons to the disgust of Natty Bumpo, or John Muir telling about the grandeur of CA’s mountains (seeing it as nature untouched, not realizing the millennia of Indigenous Peoples who had “tended” their natural world), or Annie Dillard watching frogs leaping toward water, humans have admired “nature” often as an object -- not as part of the living organism that is our planet. This course will both examine nature as amazing life but more explicitly examine our effects on that life: animal and plant. We have always had voices countering these behaviors. We will read from a variety of environmental writers from 19th century’s Thoreau to 20th century’s Bill McKibben and Wendell Berry to Linda Hogan and other Native American voices that to this day confront the abasement of the environment whether of a wall being built through sensitive landscapes and habitats or of a pipeline moving oil sludge through sacred waterways and hills. As well as reading and researching, we will write, following our minds and eyes to a better understanding of humans’ effect on the natural world through their construction, extraction, and other actions to build “civilization.”

ENG 450G STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE: Democracy's Stories
TR 3:30
Michelle Sizemore

Democracy has dominated public discourse recently. But what is meant by “democracy,” and what are democracy’s stories? This course explores narratives about America, its aspirations and failings, and government for and by the people. Since this is an English class, we will place special emphasis on the role of language and representation in the creation of American identities and democratic ideals. We will explore the allure of the American Dream and the desire to “sing America” alongside forces of exclusion and assimilation based on race, gender, sexuality, religion, region, and class. We will probe topics in our fictional landscape that seem unrelated to democracy at first: utopianism and dystopianism, worldbuilding, conspiracy theories, trust and its erosion, political emotions, charisma and celebrity, social media activism, and more. Our readings will span the nineteenth- through the twenty-first centuries and may include the folllowing: poetry by Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes, stories by Edgar Allan Poe, William Wells Brown's Clotel: The President's Daughter, Louisa May Alcott's Behind a Mask: Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Philip Roth's The Plot Against America, Lin-Manuel Miranda's Hamilton, Claudia Rankine's Citizen, Celeste Ng's Everything I Never Told You, Brit Bennett's The Vanishing Half, Colson Whitehead's The Nickel Boys, and others. 

ENG 460G / AAS 400 STUDIES IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LIT: Black Liberation
TR 9:30
Shauna Morgan

This course will explore the ideas and practices of Black artists and thinkers who engage questions of freedom, and it will examine the myriad ways in which ideas of freedom have been expressed and reconfigured. Utilizing a multidisciplinary approach to contemplate what it means to be free while mediating notions of power, resistance, and identity, we will critically explore and analyze a range of cultural productions particularly in literature, film, music, visual art, and critical thought with attention to the global linkages and disjunctions which emerge near or alongside social movements and independence struggles from slave insurrections to anti-apartheid fights to the freedom movements of the current era. Students will move towards locating continuities and changes in the cultural productions of Black thinkers and artists, including exploring their engagement with radical epistemologies, probing the complex and conflicted relationship of Black artists/cultural producers to their audiences and critics, and situating Black artists and intellectuals engaging ideas of freedom in the broader context of global Black liberation movements.  

ENG 490G STUDIES IN LITERATURE AND GENDER: Women and Autobiography
TR 12:30
Marion Rust

An advanced course focusing on any aspect of gender in literary studies, such as gender and genre, gender issues in a particular literary period, masculinity, minority women writers, or feminist literary theory. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. Prerequisite ENG 330 Text and Context or consent of the instructor. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.

ENG 495 MAJOR HONORS SEMINAR: The Literary Lives of Animals
MW 4:30
Michael Trask

Though commentary on the connection between nonhuman animals and human beings stretches back to antiquity, this class will focus primarily on some efforts in modern society to explain (or explain away) the relationship between animals and persons.  By “modern society,” I mean Anglo-American culture after the spread of Darwin’s theory of evolution; and by “the relationship between animals and persons,” I mean the disavowal or embrace of the proximity between human and nonhuman animals, the identification of ourselves with animals or the denial of any such identification.  The class will also consider what if anything we owe to animals: whether they are creatures who deserve “rights” equivalent to those of persons (a still-extreme position in our ethical repertoire) or whether they deserve merely our kindness (this too is in the view of many people a still-extreme position).  That there is a clear similarity between human and nonhuman animals is self-evident; that there is a clear distinction between human and nonhuman animals is equally self-evident.  Looking at a variety of literary and philosophical texts over the course of the twentieth century, this class will try to make sense of—even if we cannot reconcile—these two self-evident axioms.  Readings will include, among others, Jack London’s The Call of the Wild, J.M. Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals, Peter Singer’s Animal Liberation, Karen Joy Fowler’s We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, Barbara Gowdy’s The White Bone, Patricia Highsmith’s A Dog’s Ransom, and Christine Korsgaard’s Fellow Creatures.

ENG 507 ADVANCED WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING: Sequences of Poetry (poetry)
TR 12:30
Julia Mae Johnson

For the student who has shown marked talent and commitment, this course provides a rigorous workshop among peers and includes additional attention to outside reading. Each student will produce a chapbook of poems or stories. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester.

ENG 507 ADVANCED WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING: Short Form Fiction
TR 11:00
Hannah Pittard

This is a generative workshop. Students should come prepared to write NEW material. We will workshop only short stories. Partial novels should not be turned in, nor should writing done previously to the class. Additionally, students will write weekly peer critiques. Prerequisites required for enrollment. 

ENG 507 ADVANCED WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING: Personal Essay (creative nonfiction)
W 3:30
Erik Reece

The term "creative nonfiction" asks us to begin thinking of the "essay" as a "story" that uses many narrative devices of fiction-writing to not only tell the truth, but to shape the truth. A successful piece of creative nonfiction should make the world appear a more intense and interesting place than its reader previously imagined. A good essay shows its writer intimately engaging the world, and it shows us a compelling view of the world through that writer's eyes.