Fall 2019 Courses

Fall 2019

 

ENG 100                                            

F 10:00am-10:50am

Sizemore, Michelle                 

All incoming freshmen with a declared English major should take this course, which serves as an introduction and orientation to the benefits and requirements of majoring in English. You will learn about literary fields including American, British, and African-American literature, and Creative Writing. You will meet professors, hear about the Creative Writing Option, learn how to earn honors and do internships in English, and also hear about study abroad options. You will meet your classmates and have opportunities to get involved with extra-curricular activities in English. You will develop your own personalized 4-year plan. Best of all, you’ll be paired with an upper-year ENG major who can help answer your questions. This class will put you on a track to excel and get the most out of your major. Prerequisites: Declared English major. 

 

ENG 107                                            

MWF 9:00-9:50am     

Pittard, Hannah                     

Welcome to college. This class will break your heart, blow your mind, and show you what it means to be a creative reader and writer. This is an introduction to the genres and craft of imaginative writing, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will study and practice writing in various modes through composition, peer critique, and research. Attendance and participation are required. 

 

 

ENG 107

MWF 10:00-10:50am

Wilkinson, Crystal

This course will serve as an introduction to the genres and craft of imaginative writing including fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Students will study and practice writing in various modes along with peer critique and research. Fulfills the UK Core requirement for intellectual inquiry in Arts and Creativity. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement and provides ENG minor credit (from the Bulletin).

           

 

 

ENG 107

MWF 12:00-12:50pm 

Howell, Dan                           

This is an introduction to the craft of creative writing and to three of its genres:  creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry.  Students will read and practice writing in those genres, and work occasionally in small groups to develop and critique the writing.   Small group work and frequent exercises aside, this is primarily a lecture class.   Our main text will be Janet Burroway’s Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft (4th ed.).  [Friday Online]  This course fulfills the UK Core requirement for Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity.

 

 

 

ENG 107

MWF 2:00-2:50

Ezekiel Perkins

This course will get you writing, reading, and thinking. It’s an introduction to three genres of creative writing: fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Students will first learn the craft elements unique to each genre by reading widely from professional examples before applying that knowledge toward the composition of their own original stories, essays, and poems. This course fulfills the UK Core requirement for Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity. This course satisfies the requirement Intellectual Inquiry into Arts and Creativity of the UK Core Curriculum. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement and provides ENG minor credit.

 

 

 

ENG 107

MWF 3:00-3:50pm

Walker, Frank 

An introduction to the genres and craft of creative writing, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will study and practice writing in various modes through composition, peer critique, and research. Lecture or lecture with discussion section. Offers credit for the UK Core requirement in Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement and provides ENG minor credit.

 

 

 

ENG 107

TR 12:30-1:45pm

Ewell, Andrew           

Poems, short stories, and essays do many things. They can “lift the veil from the hidden beauty of the world,” as Shelley once remarked, or they can strike like an axe at “the frozen sea within us,” as Kafka declared. They can “entertain and inform” (I.B. Singer), or they can settle the record of “the quarrel with ourselves” (Yeats). 

This course will introduce you to these and various other powers of literary art through exposure to some of the best examples of short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction, and it will give you the chance to dip your pens in the ink and experience, for yourselves, the strange wonder of writing from the imagination.

 

 

 

ENG 130-SR                                      

MWF 11:00-11:50am 

Eldred, Janet             

What makes a classic novel or play (like Hamlet, or Jane Eyre or Frankenstein) work—over time and in so many incarnations?  This section of ENG 130 will focus on remakes of classics and on your own remaking of classics.   You’ll read a few short novels or plays (novellas), watch films and TV adaptations, and throughout the course, engage in short creative writing exercises or “mini-adaptations.”  Expect to read and compose short pieces each week.

 

 

 

ENG 130-SR

TR 9:30-10:45am

Bengtsson, Frederick             

Revenge: A kind of wild justice, a way of getting retribution when society has failed you, or part of an unending cycle of bloody violence that threatens to destroy society itself? Writers and artists have asked this question for thousands of years, making revenge one of the most enduring literary and artistic themes. From the familial, mythical dramas of the ancient Greeks where wives kills husbands and children kill their parents, to the spectacular violence of Renaissance revenge tragedies where blood flows freely and body parts litter the stage, to the frontier justice of the American Western where the good guys go after the bad guys, this class will consider revenge stories in all their variety. Grade will be based on a midterm, a final exam, and regular written assignments.

 

           

ENG 130-SR

TR 12:30-1:45pm       

Carter, Michael         

Blood. Seduction. Sex. Eternal life. What more could describe the appeal of the vampire in today’s popular culture? From the folktales of the Carpathian Mountains, and early 19th century literature comes one of the most enduring creatures to capture the audiences: vampire, Dracula, night walkers. This undead creature has its roots in Romanian folklore and history as Vlad Tepes, or Vlad the Impaler, and found its way into short stories and novels, early and recent films, and television. This class will examine the roots and the ongoing literature and visual media that indeed gives the vampire life eternal. Coursework will include readings and two 5-6 page creative essays, one collaborative project (a web page or other creative presentation), as well as shorter writing and discussion assignments.

 

 

 

ENG 130-SR

TR 2:00-3:15pm

Shortslef, Emily         

Who doesn’t love a love story? In this class we’ll explore a selection of love stories from antiquity to the present from a range of genres, including plays, novels, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction, and maybe a film too. In talking about love we will inevitably be talking about self-discovery and identity, gender and sexuality, and betrayal and loss, and our discussions about these texts will also serve as points of entry to the practices—and the delights—of literary analysis and interpretation. In addition to the assigned reading, coursework will include a midterm and a final exam, and several short papers.

 

 

 

ENG 130-SR

TR 2:00-3:15pm

Roorda, Randall                    

According to UK’s description, ENG 130 “introduces students to literary works of various styles that deal with current subjects and creative applications.” Our subject is current yet perennial: all that we call outdoors. It’s a vast subject, comprehending all that’s not indoors—everything in existence for six billion years until a few thousand years ago when doors got invented. The universe mostly lacks doors: step outside and there’s a clear path to the nearest black hole. Yet indoors is a category containing most of what most of us do. In this class we’ll flip the script, taking indoors as teensy and outdoors as definitive for human culture as for other life forms and galactic happenings. As for creative applications, we’ll read, watch, compile and make things exploring ordinary outdoor pursuits: strolling, hiking, bicycling, camping, boating, gardening, certain sports, festivities, regard of nature, etc. By “make things” I mostly mean write, especially by hand, putting ink on paper. We’ll ply other modes of making as well, but reading and writing are the core. (No formal papers, though.) Also, we’ll spend time outdoors: go out and play. (Class members can count on learning some trees.)

 

 

 

ENG 142                                            

MWF 11:00-11:50am 

MacDonald, Joyce     

In this UK Core course, students will read Shakespeare as he’s played around the world. Even though most of us know his plays through English-language versions, they’re been produced on every continent except Antarctica, in dozens of languages, and in a range of international cultural contexts. What is there about Shakespeare’s plays that make them such rich raw material for these international encounters? How do his meanings change in non-English speaking countries, in nonChristian cultures, or outside the western world? What is different about global Shakespeare, and what remains familiar in these worldwide treatments of his work?

 

 

ENG 180: Men and Machines                          

MWF 12:00-12:50pm  

Godbey, Matt              

A course introducing students to films of various genres and styles, from both historical and contemporary filmmakers, investigating a particular issue or theme. Topics vary by semester and are chosen by faculty to give a broad-based understanding of important cinematic works, trends, and the creative processes behind this important, collaborative artform. As with all Arts and Creativity classes, this class will require students to produce an artistic artifact. Intended as a general humanities course for non-majors. Lecture and section. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or provide ENG Major Elective credit. Fulfills the UK Core requirement in Arts and Creativity

 

 

ENG 180: The Hitchcock Thriller      

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Foreman, Walt

This course will be based on a series of the "thriller" movies of Alfred Hitchcock, more particularly on movies where an "innocent" man or woman accidentally gets caught up in a dangerous plot that was originally proceeding along its sinister way without them.  In addition to the Hitchcock movies, we'll consider about five post-Hitchcock movies that work with similar themes of innocence snared by peril.  Movies will likely include The 39 Steps (Alfred Hitchcock, 1935), Shadow of a Doubt (Hitchcock, 1943), Notorious  (Hitchcock, 1946), Strangers on a Train (Hitchcock, 1951),  Rear Window (Hitchcock, 1954), North by Northwest (Hitchcock, 1959), Psycho (Hitchcock, 1960), Charade (Stanley Donen, 1963), The Tall Blond Man with One Black Shoe (Yves Robert, 1972), and Diva (Jean-Jacques Beineix, 1981).  One question to be considered: since these movies are so enjoyable, what is it that makes danger . . . fun?  This course satisfies the Arts and Creativity requirement in the UK Core and thus requires a "creative artifact": for the final project students will imagine and describe the adventures of a fictional character as an innocent caught up in a story involving forces the students find threatening.

 

 

ENG 180-SR   

TR 2:00-3:15pm          

TBD

A course introducing students to films of various genres and styles, from both historical and contemporary filmmakers, investigating a particular issue or theme. Topics vary by semester and are chosen by faculty to give a broad-based understanding of important cinematic works, trends, and the creative processes behind this important, collaborative artform. As with all Arts and Creativity classes, this class will require students to produce an artistic artifact. Intended as a general humanities course for non-majors. Lecture and section. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or provide ENG Major Elective credit. Fulfills the UK Core requirement in Arts and Creativity

 

           

ENG 191                                            

TR 2:00-3:15pm

Clymer, Jeff   

In this course, we will use literature to help us think about what “citizenship” has meant in the United States.  Citizenship is a term with a legal meaning, of course, and we will use that to incite a good deal of thinking about what citizenship has really meant as an inclusionary/exclusionary idea for Americans over the last two centuries.  The novels, short stories, and creative nonfiction that we will read all feature heroes and heroines who quest for something better, who feel a restless pull toward freedom or a better life just around the corner.  Our readings will combine some of the most famous and worth-reading-again books in American literature (for example, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby) and other books that are equally amazing, but which you are less likely to have read, or perhaps even to have heard of previously (Don DeLillo’s White Noise, Amy Waldman’s The Submission, Asali Solomon’s Disgruntled). 

 

Grade will be based on short writing assignments, quizzes, exams, as well as attendance and participation. 

 

This course can be used to fulfill either the UKCore requirement, “Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA” or “Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities.”

 

 

 

 

ENG 207- Creative Nonfiction                         

MWF 9:00-9:50am

Eldred, Janet   

A beginning workshop in the craft of writing, teaching students how to read critically and how to revise work in progress. The students provide an audience for each others' work. Exercises involve practice in aspects of craft and promote experimentation with different forms, subjects, and approaches; outside reading provides models and inspiration. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Required for ENG Creative Writing Option.           

 

 

ENG 207- Fiction

TR 3:30-4:45pm         

Milward, Andrew                  

This is an introductory course on the art and craft of fiction writing. Over the course of the semester students will learn the building blocks of fiction through the exploration of core craft elements in our textbook , as well as through in-class writing exercises. Being a good writer starts with being a good reader, so we will also carefully study stories by professional writers. Students will compose their own works of fiction, beginning with full-length short stories and moving on to more compressed—and some would argue more difficult—forms like flash fiction and microfiction. This class follows the workshop model, so students can expect to have their work discussed and critiqued by the class in both small and large groups. 

 

 

ENG 207- Screenwriting        

MW 3:00-4:15pm       

Howell, Dan               

In this class you’ll be reading and studying screenplays, watching film clips, and reading various .pdf's to help you develop a working familiarity with screenplay format, narrative structures, characters, settings, dialogue etc.  Most of that familiarity will be generated through writing you’ll do both in and out of class, and will include some specialized forms (loglines, e.g.) and -- necessarily and most importantly -- a screenplay for a short film or a portion of a feature-length film.  The class will also require cooperative activities such as group-work on various pieces of writing as well as workshopping as much as we can manage, especially as the semester progresses and you’re submitting your screenplay material.  Grades will be based on writing assignments, occasional brief quizzes, timely submission of assignments, participation, and a Portfolio containing revised screenwriting work.

 

 

ENG 207- Poetry

MW 2:00-3:15pm        

Elkins, Ansel               

A beginning workshop in the craft of writing, teaching students how to read critically and how to revise work in progress. The students provide an audience for each others' work. Exercises involve practice in aspects of craft and promote experimentation with different forms, subjects, and approaches; outside reading provides models and inspiration. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Required for ENG Creative Writing Option.

 

 

 

ENG 207

MWF 11:00-11:50am  

Williams, Peter

This course is a beginning workshop in fiction writing. The primary goal of this workshop is for each student to produce 2-3 well-polished short stories of varying lengths. We will discuss matters of craft and we will look at recently published work in several different styles in order to think about what we want and don’t want to do in our own fiction. But the goal of this class is for each member of the workshop to become a writer of their own fiction by critically reading their own fiction and that of others. In order to accomplish these goals, each writer will read the work of the other writers and give feedback as well as do one major revision of one of their own stories.

This workshop will read and discuss every piece of fiction in terms of “story”—what constitutes a story and how does a story succeed, always with the objective of improving our own fiction. The goal is for each student to write—and to revise—their best work.

 

 

                                       

ENG 230

MWF 9:00-9:50am

Ferrington, Jake

Most of us believe we are in control of our lives and decisions despite experiencing times when outside forces made us feel just the opposite. Literature, on the page and on the screen, has often struggled with the limits, conditions, or even the existence of individual free will. This course will ask you to bring various texts into conversation with each other around the topic of free will and human agency. One text—Netflix’s Black Mirror—will inform and focus our exploration of the question, problem, nature, and possible myth of free will through related sub-topics like artificial intelligence, technology, social media, nature/the wild, mass destruction, and genetic manipulation. You may expect to engage with novels, graphic novels, short stories, film and television. Selections may include Saunders’s “Escape from Spiderhead,” Hopkins’s Of One Blood, McCarthy’s The Road, Crane’s Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, Butler’s Wild Seed, Moore’s Watchmen, Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Bechdel’s Fun Home and Are You My Mother?, Garland’s Ex Machina.

 

 

 

ENG 230

MWF 10:00-10:50am  

Ferrington, Jake

Most of us believe we are in control of our lives and decisions despite experiencing times when outside forces made us feel just the opposite. Literature, on the page and on the screen, has often struggled with the limits, conditions, or even the existence of individual free will. This course will ask you to bring various texts into conversation with each other around the topic of free will and human agency. One text—Netflix’s Black Mirror—will inform and focus our exploration of the question, problem, nature, and possible myth of free will through related sub-topics like artificial intelligence, technology, social media, nature/the wild, mass destruction, and genetic manipulation. You may expect to engage with novels, graphic novels, short stories, film and television. Selections may include Saunders’s “Escape from Spiderhead,” Hopkins’s Of One Blood, McCarthy’s The Road, Crane’s Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, Butler’s Wild Seed, Moore’s Watchmen, Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper,” Bechdel’s Fun Home and Are You My Mother?, Garland’s Ex Machina.

 

 

 

ENG 241                                            

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Giancarlo, Matt                     

A survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the later seventeenth century, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the early English literary tradition. Texts and authors covered may include Beowulf and Old English elegiac poetry; Middle English poetry and selections from Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales; Renaissance lyrics, sonnets, and narrative poetry; the drama of Shakespeare; selections from John Milton’s Paradise Lost; and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement and Early Period requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 331.

 

ENG 251                                            

MWF 1:00-1:50pm    

Prats, Armando         

The works of American literature that you will read in this course, even when only in abbreviated form, will make you see their inherent relevance to these difficult and critical times in the history of our country. Virtually all the political, cultural, and, yes, moral issues being currently can be found, in varying degrees of emphasis, and expressed with different measures of insight, passion, and eloquence, in most of the material that we will read for this course.

 

Consider, especially in the context of arguments about immigration or gender issues or about racial conflict, the seemingly simple question: “What is American?” What might such a question have meant (if anything) in 1492, when Columbus “discovered” America? Or in 1520, during the Spanish devastation of the Aztec empire? In 1620 when the Mayflower landed on Plymouth Rock? Or in 1776, when the colonies declared independence from England? In 1848, following the U.S. defeat of Mexico and the resulting acquisition of what are, today, the U.S. states of New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, California, Texas, and western Colorado and southern Wyoming? (Where would the “wall” be built if the U.S. would’ve lost that war?) Or in 1861, when the slave-holding states seceded from the United States of America? Or in 1865, when former slaves became, as it were with the stroke of the pen, Americans?

 

And these other questions: Where was / is America? If a Spaniard wrote in Spanish in what is today Texas or New Mexico but was then part of “New Spain,” does he or she speak to us as an American? And if America came into being gradually, as a result of colonization, purchase, annexation, and violent conquest, should the conquered people—what’s left of them, at any rate—be excluded or included as Americans? Are they more American for being here first or less so for having suffered conquest? Is America (as distinct from the United States) really, or only, a place or even only a time?

 

So consider some of the more particular questions, drawn from some of the readings that we will undertake: Can a Spaniard enslaved by Indians in Florida walk all the way to Mexico and arrive as neither Spaniard nor Indian—is he an American? Can an English woman captured by Indians in 1676 tell a story that merits inclusion in a survey of American literature in 2019? Can a Puritan woman (in 1697) who killed and scalped the Indians who captured her be the subject of works that can be profitably studied in a course on American literature? What do we learn about Puritan massacres of Indians in seventeenth-century colonial America? How do former black slaves become Americans—is it only because a white man signed a piece of paper, or could it be because the very concept of America transcends skin color? How is America hope?

 

So we will let American literature speak to us, that we may reflect upon it and learn from the triumphs and defeats of Americans and America, from that which at times makes America seem small and petty and persistently Puritanical, but, above all, from that America that still and despite all remains, in Lincoln’s phrase, “the last best hope of earth.”

 

 

 

 

ENG 251

TR 2:00-3:15pm         

Doolen, Andy             

How did American authors capture and express the social and political pressures of a robust period of nation building? What sorts of stories, subjects, and genres captivated their audience and attempted to define a American identity? In this course, you will develop answers to these essential questions. We will read novels, short stories, poems, autobiographies, slave narratives, and historical essays from a multicultural mix of authors. We will pay special attention to the larger cultural history and the links between specific pieces of literature and the historical events that may have shaped them, including conflicts over slavery, the national policy of Indian Removal, and debates about American Empire in the 1850s.

 

 

 

ENG 252                                             

MWF 10:00-10:50am  

Godbey, Matt              

A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present, with an emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of later periods in U.S. history. The course explores the changing social conditions in which American literature was produced?such as the Roaring 20?s, the Cold War, and the upheaval of the 1960?s?and several key literary movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Texts and authors covered may include Edith Wharton?s House of Mirth, Nella Larsen?s Quicksand, Ernest Hemingway, Toni Morrison, the poetry of Marianne Moore and Elizabeth Bishop, and more. Lecture or Lecture and Discussion. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 335.

View offering history

 

 

 

ENG 252

TR 9:30-10:45am       

Carter, Michael         

After the United States fought itself in its bloody Civil War, it began to find distinct literary voices. From the late 19th century’s Mark Twain to Nobel winner Toni Morrison, the works show the diversity that mixes the melting pot. The survey course will wander (or wonder) through the decades, from Romanticism through Realism and Regionalism into the Post Modern, to see how that literary voice has continued to evolve. We will read through a variety of authors and let them tell us about who we are as Americans. Several short essays, a midterm and daily discussions will be our ever changing dance.

 

           

ENG 260

MWF 2:00-2:50pm      

McClain, Kathryn

Ralph Ellison claimed that Black American consciousness is not formed by forgetting the past and its harsh realities but instead by a will to memory “sustained and constantly reinforced by events.” In this spirit, black writers have consistently remembered, recalled, resisted and reinforced such memory to explore questions of race, belonging, and equality in the United States. This course will examine such writing via novels, short stories, drama, nonfiction, film, television, and graphic novels - as well as adaptations within these varied genres - from the 19th century to the present in order to engage with reinforced and (re)written narratives. Students will consider topics such as slavery, rebellion, protest, identity, and gender in order to complete written analysis on historical and cultural context, produce presentations on texts by black writers, and create a final digital project. Content will include writings from authors such as Octavia E. Butler, Audre Lorde and Colson Whitehead, as well as films by directors such as Denzel Washington and Jordan Peele.

 

 

           

ENG 265                                             

TR 9:30-10:45am        

Davis, Rynetta             

A survey of African-American literature from the mid-eighteenth century to Reconstruction and after, with emphasis on selected genres, periods, and thematic characteristics of the early African-American cultural and literary experience. Topics include colonialism and abolitionism; early black aesthetics, narratives of enslavement, and drama, novels, and poetry. Authors may include Jupiter Hammon, Phillis Wheatley, William Wells Brown, George Moses Horton, Martin Delaney, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, Ellen Craft, and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.

 

 

 

ENG 280                                             

MWF 9:00-9:50am      

Griffith, Zachary                     

In the past decade or so, we’ve seen an onslaught of nostalgic media in American culture, from shows like Stranger Things and films like Ready Player One to music from Ariana Grande, Arcade Fire, and practically everyone in between. 90s fashion is also back in vogue, and Urban Outfitters is selling early 2000s-style burned CDs and used VHS tapes. We live in a time where we’re surrounded by media from the past, and where we can access that past at the push of a button. But why do we want to? What drives our obsession with the styles and experiences of bygone eras? This course will investigate nostalgia—the infatuation with the past—through films from directors like Wes Anderson, Steven Spielberg, David Lynch, Richard Linklater, and Greta Gerwig, as well as the first season of Stranger Things, in an effort to consider why we turn to the past, and what this desire tells us about the present. In doing so, the course will introduce students to the basics of film, interpretation, and argument, and we will produce work in written, oral, and digital forms.

 

 

 

ENG 280

MWF 10:00-10:50am 

Howell, Dan               

This is a basic introduction to the study of film, which includes film history as well as elements of film form such as mise-en-scène, cinematography, sound, editing, film genres, and the narrative structures of films.  Each of those subjects brings with it an array of terms that we’ll use when discussing and analyzing films.  There will be frequent in-class screening of clips, trailers, and shorts (even a cartoon or two).  But our primary focus will be 11-12 feature-length films that range across time and genres (comedy, horror, western, crime etc.).  There will be at least one silent film, one foreign film, black-and-white films, and R-rated films; all will be screened in WillyT's AV room on the day before we discuss them, all will be on reserve in the library, and most films can be streamed.  Each week will center on a different film, and by the end of the semester you will have seen some of the world’s great films, plus you’ll be acquainted with many film artists and films that are new to you -- you’ll be a much more sophisticated filmgoer.  Your grade for the course will be based on weekly short quizzes, weekly short screening responses, and a final exam.

 

 

 

ENG 280

MWF 10:00-10:50am  

Griffith, Zachary                     

In the past decade or so, we’ve seen an onslaught of nostalgic media in American culture, from shows like Stranger Things and films like Ready Player One to music from Ariana Grande, Arcade Fire, and practically everyone in between. 90s fashion is also back in vogue, and Urban Outfitters is selling early 2000s-style burned CDs and used VHS tapes. We live in a time where we’re surrounded by media from the past, and where we can access that past at the push of a button. But why do we want to? What drives our obsession with the styles and experiences of bygone eras? This course will investigate nostalgia—the infatuation with the past—through films from directors like Wes Anderson, Steven Spielberg, David Lynch, Richard Linklater, and Greta Gerwig, as well as the first season of Stranger Things, in an effort to consider why we turn to the past, and what this desire tells us about the present. In doing so, the course will introduce students to the basics of film, interpretation, and argument, and we will produce work in written, oral, and digital forms.

 

 

 

ENG 280

MWF 11:00-11:50am  

TBD

An introduction to the study of films as narrative art and cultural documents. The course involves viewing and analyzing films from different genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to view films closely, how to relate films to their contexts, and how to employ the basic terms and concepts of film analysis. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. Viewing films outside of class is required. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.

 

           

ENG 280

MWF 12:00-12:50pm

TBD                

An introduction to the study of films as narrative art and cultural documents. The course involves viewing and analyzing films from different genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to view films closely, how to relate films to their contexts, and how to employ the basic terms and concepts of film analysis. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. Viewing films outside of class is required. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.

 

 

ENG 280

TR 8:00-9:15am         

Roberts, Justin

Media shapes virtually every aspect of our 21st century existence. Film, as part of the media, has long been interested in its own power, as well as the power and obligations of other branches of the media. Introduction to Film: Fake News?: The Media and the Public will look at films that examine the media’s role in entertainment and information, as well the public obligation of the new and entertainment media. Expected films include Citizen KaneSpotlight, and Network.

 

                       

ENG 280

TR 9:30-10:45am

Roberts, Justin            

Media shapes virtually every aspect of our 21st century existence. Film, as part of the media, has long been interested in its own power, as well as the power and obligations of other branches of the media. Introduction to Film: Fake News?: The Media and the Public will look at films that examine the media’s role in entertainment and information, as well the public obligation of the new and entertainment media. Expected films include Citizen KaneSpotlight, and Network.

 

 

 

ENG 280

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Lenviel, Claire

In the current era of Black Lives Matter and #OscarsSoWhite, American moviegoers have increasingly turned their attention to the Hollywood screen for its treatment of race. Blackness in contemporary cinema, the subtitle of this course, sparks intellectual conversations about cultural appropriation, representation on and behind the screen, whitewashing, Blaxploitation, historical revisionism, liberal fantasies, and the politics of protest, pride, and love. In this course, students will watch, discuss, and analyze contemporary films about blackness including Django Unchained (2012), Straight Outta Compton (2015), Get Out (2017), and BlacKkKlansman (2018), all with the end-goal of developing our individual and collective knowledge about the current landscape of race in Hollywood cinema. Student will also learn introductory terminology and techniques of film studies, including how to formulate arguments grounded in visual analysis.

 

 

 

ENG 280

TR 12:30-1:45pm

Lenviel, Claire            

In the current era of Black Lives Matter and #OscarsSoWhite, American moviegoers have increasingly turned their attention to the Hollywood screen for its treatment of race. Blackness in contemporary cinema, the subtitle of this course, sparks intellectual conversations about cultural appropriation, representation on and behind the screen, whitewashing, Blaxploitation, historical revisionism, liberal fantasies, and the politics of protest, pride, and love. In this course, students will watch, discuss, and analyze contemporary films about blackness including Django Unchained (2012), Straight Outta Compton (2015), Get Out (2017), and BlacKkKlansman (2018), all with the end-goal of developing our individual and collective knowledge about the current landscape of race in Hollywood cinema. Student will also learn introductory terminology and techniques of film studies, including how to formulate arguments grounded in visual analysis.

 

 

 

 

ENG 280

TR 12:30-1:45pm       

Bengtsson, Frederick             

This course will introduce students to the study of cinema as a medium, and to the tools and vocabulary of film analysis. By learning about and attending to key elements of film production and form (genre, cinematography, mise-en-scene, editing, sound and lighting, etc.) in a variety of films, we will consider the ways in which filmmakers shape our experience of their work and create meaning within it. We will move beyond watching films passively toward thinking about them analytically, both in artistic and aesthetic terms, and in terms of the ideas and ideologies they articulate, reinforce, and resist. Grade will be based on a midterm, a final exam, and regular written assignments. Viewing films outside of class is required.

 

 

 

 

ENG 280

TR 2:00-3:15pm         

Bengtsson, Frederick             

This course will introduce students to the study of cinema as a medium, and to the tools and vocabulary of film analysis. By learning about and attending to key elements of film production and form (genre, cinematography, mise-en-scene, editing, sound and lighting, etc.) in a variety of films, we will consider the ways in which filmmakers shape our experience of their work and create meaning within it. We will move beyond watching films passively toward thinking about them analytically, both in artistic and aesthetic terms, and in terms of the ideas and ideologies they articulate, reinforce, and resist. Grade will be based on a midterm, a final exam, and regular written assignments. Viewing films outside of class is required.

 

 

 

ENG 280

MW 2:00-3:15pm       

Axley, Catharine                    

Children have been depicted on screen throughout cinema’s history. From the Lumière brothers’ 1895 Le Repas de Bébé, to Sean Baker’s 2017 The Florida Project, cinematic representations of children have affirmed our modern understanding of childhood as distinct from adulthood and as characterized by play, wonder, imagination, exploration, and an ever-widening awareness of oneself and the surrounding world. In this course, we will explore cinema’s capacity for storytelling through the cinematic representation of childhood within five distinct themes: (1) the child’s surrounding social environment; (2) the child as witness to and reflection of the complexities of the adult world, (3) the rich fantasies and imagination of the child’s mind, (4) the child’s developing sense of self, and (5) real children on screen. Students will learn to identify the formal techniques of filmmaking and discuss their impact on the film’s meaning. Though our primary focus will be on close film analysis, we will also briefly engage with the cultural and historical contexts of the course’s films and the film industry, developing an understanding for film not just as narrative art, but also as cultural document.

 

 

 

ENG 290                                            

MWF 9:00-9:50pm    

Janet Eldred

Love, intimacy, violence, family, illness, and all manner of mayhem.  This introduction to literature by women focuses on U.S. women who changed the scripts we read and hear.   Units Include: Women Take Back the Night, Love and Risk, and Living to Tell the Tale.

 

 

 

ENG 307- Telling Stories in Poetry and Creative Nonfiction                                     

MWF 1:00-1:50pm    

Eldred, Janet 

The goal of this workshop is to help you craft stories (“fictions”) in creative nonfiction and poetry.  We will focus on the question: “What is the story here?” with the understanding that a successful piece of creative nonfiction or narrative poem should make the world appear a more intense and interesting place than its reader previously imagined. Expect to read short pieces each week and to draft poems or short pieces of prose every other week. 

 

 

ENG 330- War Poetry and the War Memoir

MWF 11:00-11:50am 

Prats, Armando         

      In a famous essay entitled “The Moral Equivalent of War” (1906), the great American philosopher, William James, attempted to explain the human ambivalence toward war by recourse to the following paradox concerning the crucial event in American history: 



 

Ask all our millions, north and south, whether they would vote now . . . to have our war for the Union expunged from history, and the record of a peaceful transition to the present time substituted for that of its marches and battles, and probably hardly a handful of eccentrics would say yes. Those ancestors, those efforts, those memories and legends, are the most ideal part of what we now own together, a sacred spiritual possession worth more than all the blood poured out. Yet ask those same people whether they would be willing, in cold blood, to start another civil war now to gain another similar possession, and not one man or woman would vote for the proposition.





James was unique as a pacifist because, though he detested war, he understood deeply the allure that war has historically held for the young of every generation (and for the old men and women who so cheerfully send them off to war). He knew, then, that any effective effort to avert war in his time would have to offer the young a purpose, a mission—one to which they could unambiguously devote their lives and toward which they could direct their best energies with the same high zeal that they had heretofore reserved for war and the military (hence “the moral equivalent of war,” “the moral equivalent of war”). 


      The soul-wrenching emotions of war, the terrifying insights that it can produce, the anguished yet transcendent testimonies of those who experience it and write poetically about it—these find their highest and truest expressions not in history or in prose fiction or even in memoirs but in poetry. The poetry of war celebrates the glory of war, the honor of fighting in it, the palpable sense of shared purpose, of selfless sacrifice, of unbounded love of country. But the poetry of war also engages—with undiminished assiduity and fervor—those other things about war—the dark and dread “things” that exist and unfold side by side with “duty, honor, country”—namely, war’s unspeakable horrors, its merciless degradations of the human spirit, its enforced surrenders to unimaginable cruelty, the remorseless (even tiresome) enactments of tragedy, of inconsolable and everlasting grief.

      This course proposes that the poetry of war, at its best, reflects with unsurpassed sophistication and complexity—with a terrible beauty, really—the paradox that James puts forth in his famous essay.

      Emphasis on the poetry of the American Civil War (especially Whitman and Melville) and of World War I. These readings to be supplemented with short readings from Homer’s Iliad, Greek drama, and Shakespeare, along with memoirs of the First World War, film clips, and (if available, the recent Peter Jackson’s restored documentary of WW I, They Shall Not Grow Old (2018).

      NO CELL PHONES, NO LAPTOPS

 

 

ENG 330- Ovid’s Metamorphoses      

MWF 1:00-1:50pm    

MacDonald, Joyce

           

Shakespeare’s favorite book, the Metamorphoses is a dazzling collection of stories that explores the limits of the human, as well as the limits of what we can ask or expect narrative to do. In this class, we will read selections from Ovid’s great poem along with examples of ancient and modern works that it responded to and inspired, observing how the principle of endless change and reordering that it details operates across periods and literary genres. Besides Shakespeare and Virgil, the class will also read responses to Ovid by Kafka, Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney, Mary Zimmerman, Louise Bogan, and others. What does Ovid tell us about history, gender, mythology, human sexuality? Two thousand years later, how are authors still interpreting his voice? Two papers, two exams, and a research project. No Latin necessary.

 

 

 

 

ENG 330- Hamlet and Revenge         

TR 9:30-10:45am       

Foreman, Walt

This section of the English major core course will focus on the close reading and analysis of Shakespeare's Hamlet in the contexts of (a) London theater conditions around 1600, (b) other "revenge" plays produced around the same time (such as Kyd's Spanish Tragedy and other plays by Shakespeare), (c) some other texts from the period (including writings by Francis Bacon and Thomas Nashe) or beyond, (d) the political, social, and economic situation in England and Ireland in which Hamlet appeared, and (e) the concept of revenge and the basis of the human impulse to revenge: why do we feel we have to get back at people?  In addition to reading Hamlet and other revenge plays, we will view and discuss in detail the 2009 film version of Hamlet directed by Gregory Doran and featuring David Tennant as Hamlet and Patrick Stewart as both Claudius and the Ghost.  In addition, one of the paper options will give students the opportunity to examine two other film versions in relation to the play.  As noted in the general catalog description, students will develop analytical and interpretive skills that deepen their historical and conceptual understanding of literature, as well as their skills of critical reading, writing, and presentation.  In particular, in this section we will seek to develop the involvement in literature fostered by aural/oral immersion.

 

 

 

ENG 330-S Apocalypse 1970!

TR 3:30-4:45pm

Trask, Michael

Around 1970, a striking number of Americans seemed convinced that the end of the world was upon us.  What was most notable about this conviction was its ecumenical cast.  Apocalyptic thinking was as common (if not more so) among secular and scientific-minded thinkers as among people of faith.  This class will survey the preoccupation with the end of the world from a variety of perspectives, from the rise of a rapture-based Christian evangelicalism (such as we find in Hal Lindsey’s The Late Great Planet Earth [1970], the bestselling book of the decade) to the prophesying of global catastrophe in environmentalist discourse (such as we find in Paul Ehrlich’s The Population Bomb [1968] or Barry Commoner’s The Closing Circle [1971]). But our primary focus will be on the retooling of the apocalyptic refrain in US culture to the texts of popular culture.  We’ll look at films like Planet of the ApesSoylent GreenA Boy and His DogLogan’s Run, and Mad Max along with novels like The Genocides (Disch), Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (Dick), Dahlgren (Delany), and The Sheep Look Up (Brunner).  Our task will be to consider why apocalypse becomes an entrancing theme in the period (there are many historical explanations on offer, including the collapse of American economic supremacy along with the ever-looming specter of destruction by nuclear weaponry) and why, more interestingly, it has persisted into our own time, since it’s undeniable that the end of the world is not going away as a compelling theme in popular culture.

 

 

           

ENG 337- The Novel                                      

MWF 1:00-1:50pm

Zunshine, Lisa

This course centers on the development of the novel as a genre, with particular emphasis on its construction of social minds. We begin with a brief sojourn in Ancient Greece and then turn to English novels written between 1770 and 1970, exploring dark currents beneath their social comedy. Authors include Frances Burney, Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, and Muriel Spark. Short written assignments, two longer papers, quizzes.

  

 

ENG 338- Monsters: From Beowulf  to I am Legend

TR 2:00-3:15pm         

Carter, Michael                     

Monsters. Boogiemen. They have haunted our stories since before time was time. From the Humbaba of Gilgamesh, the snaked-haired Medusa, the man-eating Wendigo, and thousands of others from every culture these stories are told and retold. This course will read the written stories from the earliest in English into the 20th century. Why are we fascinated with these tales? What darkness do they reveal about ourselves? Perhaps through some close reading, some research, some films, and some writing we will begin to uncover these answers.  Several short essays, a midterm and daily readings are on the agenda. Come. Sit around our literary campfire. Let’s find the bit of Edward or Edwina Hyde in all of us.

 

 

ENG 339-Charles Chesnutt's Literary Career

An advanced course exploring a focused literary topic across various periods, genres, styles, and media. It focuses on the creative connections in literature unifying a shared set of themes or topical concerns (e.g., narratives of travel; the family through history; stories about work and play; ethnic identities; nature and the natural world). Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. May fulfill ENG Early Period requirement depending on the course: see departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Prereq: Completion of UK Core Composition and Communication I-II requirement or equivalent.

 

ENG 370                                            

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Doolen, Andy             

This course focuses on the literature of border crossing, exile, and displacement. We will primarily read contemporary works from three literary traditions—Native American, Latino, and African American—and explore the ways in which they depict the experiences of inhabiting “contact zones” and traveling “between” cultures and nations. We will learn how to recognize and interpret the specific types of borders that are imagined, and traversed, in these texts. How do those borders relate to the lived realities of border crossing in North America?  How do race, gender, citizenship, and class influence the ways in which characters and communities negotiate these borderlands? How do acts of border crossing, through real and imagined borderlands, infuse the author’s alternative social and political vision? The course will focus largely on 20th and 21st century literature.

 

ENG 384                                            

TR 12:30-1:45pm       

Shortslef, Emily         

Few writers have had their work adapted for the screen as frequently as Shakespeare. In this class we’ll read 5-6 Shakespearean plays (including HamletOthello, and Much Ado About Nothing) alongside some of their many film versions. What are the different ways in which filmmakers translate 400-year- old texts into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? How does film compare to theatrical drama as a medium? What does it mean to “adapt” a play? Why does Shakespeare continue to be relevant to contemporary filmmakers and audiences? Coursework will include a midterm and final exam, and several papers. Please note that you will be responsible for viewing all films *outside* of class.   

 

ENG 399--Interniships in English-related job settings

The Department of English internship is available for qualified students (sophomores and up who have completed the UK CORE CCR requirement) to receive academic credit through applied and practical experience with a variety of private and public entities, including but not limited to the University Press of Kentucky, law firms, media outlets, the Lexington Public Library, the Carnegie Center, and others.  In some cases, the English Dept. works to find students to fill existing positions. In others, the students can find an internship and then work with English to earn credit. In both scenarios, the student will work with a sponsor in a field-, community-based, practical or applied educational experience.

Credits: 1-3 credit hours, graded only on a pass-fail basis. Repeatable for a total of up to 6 credit hours.

For more information, contact Pearl James, pearl.james@uky.edu

 

ENG 407-SR/ENG 507-002: Poetry                               

TR 12:30-1:45pm        

Johnson, Julia              

 

 

 

ENG 407-SR

TR 3:30-4:45pm

Ewell, Andrew           

This is a course for writers with some prior workshop experience and a degree of understanding about the mechanics and terminology associated with the craft of fiction. In brief: you’ve done a bit of this before, now's your chance to sharpen your skills through close reading, attention to technique, and focused critique. 

Course activities include discussion of published short stories, peer critique, short writing prompts, and workshop.

 

 

 

 

ENG 407-SR / ENG 507-001 Creative Nonfiction

M 5:00-7:30pm          

Norman, Gurney

In this course, students practice the art of fiction writing. The focus is on short story writing but other forms of narrative fiction (and non-fiction) may be included. Our class meetings feature writing exercises in which students practice various aspects of traditional story-writing such as plot development, dialogue, description, character development and different styles of narration. They also feature intensive small-group meetings for discussion and critique. Each week throughout the semester, students will bring to each class 3 pages (700-800 words) of new writing. The pieces will be in the form of 'take home' exercise assignments. In addition to weekly writing exercises in and out of class, you will be asked to produce during the semester two polished, original stories that represent your best effort, plus, near semester's end, one finely-edited story for the class' magazine, INTURN.

 

 

ENG 425                                             

TR 3:30-4:45pm

Roorda, Randall                      

Students will consider the way writers address environmental issues by exploring various forms of environmental writing, from personal narrative to literary nonfiction to advocacy. Students will be required to take a mandatory day long field trip to UK's Robinson Forest. All students must participate in this field trip.

 

 

 

ENG 460G-SR                                    

TR 9:30-10:45am        

Wright, Nazera                      

Beginning with kidnapped African slave revolutionary poet Phillis Wheatley and ending with the Prison Arts Coalition, this course examines work created by women under supervisory conditions. We will range from 17th-century settler colonialist Anne Bradstreet to 20th-century activists Adrienne Rich and Audre Lorde to 21st-century writers and multi-media artists Claudia Rankine, Susan Howe, and Kate Tempest. In different ways, all these visionaries found, and find, the legitimacy of their art called into question. The question is, does anyone who creates from a position other than propertied white cisgender heterocompulsive manhood ever escape the question asked by this course’s title?

 

 

 

ENG 490G-SR                                    

MWF 1:00-1:50pm      

Rust, Marion               

Beginning with kidnapped African slave revolutionary poet Phillis Wheatley and ending with the Prison Arts Coalition, this course examines work created by women under supervisory conditions. We will range from 17th-century settler colonialist Anne Bradstreet to 20th-century activists Adrienne Rich and Audre Lorde to 21st-century writers and multi-media artists Claudia Rankine, Susan Howe, and Kate Tempest. In different ways, all these visionaries found, and find, the legitimacy of their art called into question. The question is, does anyone who creates from a position other than propertied white cisgender heterocompulsive manhood ever escape the question asked by this course’s title?

 

 

ENG 495-SR                                      

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Clymer, Jeff   

In this department honors seminar, we will study the major authors and literary movements of the 1920s in the United States.  We will read works by authors such as Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, Nella Larsen, Jean Toomer, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, and Langston Hughes.  We will examine their literary works within a broad artistic context including surrealism, Dadaism, modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, painting, music, and film, while also paying close attention to the historical milieu in which these artists lived and worked.  Assignments will likely include an oral presentation, a longer research paper, and shorter writing assignments. 

 

 

 

 

ENG 507-SR / 407-002: Poetry                        

TR 12:30-1:45pm

Johnson, Julia  

 

 

 

ENG 507-SR / 407-001 Creative Nonfiction

M 5:00-7:30pm          

Norman, Gurney       

In this course, students practice the art of fiction writing. The focus is on short story writing but other forms of narrative fiction (and non-fiction) may be included. Our class meetings feature writing exercises in which students practice various aspects of traditional story-writing such as plot development, dialogue, description, character development and different styles of narration. They also feature intensive small-group meetings for discussion and critique. Each week throughout the semester, students will bring to each class 3 pages (700-800 words) of new writing. The pieces will be in the form of 'take home' exercise assignments. In addition to weekly writing exercises in and out of class, you will be asked to produce during the semester two polished, original stories that represent your best effort, plus, near semester's end, one finely-edited story for the class' magazine, INTURN.

 

 

ENG 507-SR

T 5:00-7:30pm

Milward, Andrew      

This is an advanced course in the art and craft of fiction writing, only available for those students with prior experience in fiction workshops. To be enrolled, students must have satisfactorily completed at least two of the following courses: ENG 107 (Introduction to Creative Writing), ENG 207 (Beginning Fiction Writing), ENG 407 (Intermediate Fiction Writing)—preferably all three. This course assumes that you have a serious interest in writing fiction, and together we will focus on the work of becoming serious writers. We will examine how various craft points are at work in the stories of professional writers, and very often these texts will serve as templates and inspiration. However, this class will primarily follow the workshop model, and therefore student work, and the discussion of same, will be our main focus. To that end, over the course of the semester students will be required to produce two complete stories, as well as a substantial revision, a paper about the revision process, and an artist statement.  

 

 

ENG 518                                            

R 2:00-4:30pm

Giancarlo, Matt                     

This course explores the development of English from its roots in Indo- European, through Old, Middle, and Early Modern English(es), culminating with a review of the English languages of today. It focuses on the phonological, grammatical, and lexical changes of the language, as well as on the social contexts of the rise and spread of English as a contemporary world language. Special emphasis is given to a linguistically informed understanding of how the language has changed in response to political and historical pressures. Fulfills the ENG Early Period requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective Credit and ENG Minor credit.

 
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