Spring 2015 Courses

English Department SPRING 2015 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENG 107-001 Writing Craft: Intro Imaginative Writing(Satisfies UK CORE Creativity Requirement)

TR 9:30-10:45am

Cheryl Cardiff
This is an introductory course in creative writing for the novice and curious interested in exploring how poetry and prose can express their ideas. In this class, we will practice a range of written creative expression. Lecture sessions will be devoted partly to “talking craft,” that is, to familiarizing ourselves with various literary and craft elements pertinent to the creative writing genres being practiced and to analyzing how writers employ these elements to put forth a work that captures readers’ imaginations. The other half of our sessions will be devoted to “crafting,” that is, the workshop process that inducts you and fellow beginning writers to experiment with the different creative writing forms studied.

 

ENG107 satisfies the objectives and outcomes delineated by the Intellectual Inquiry into Arts and Creativity of the UK Core Curriculum, the primary emphasis of which is to define and distinguish different approaches to creativity, demonstrate the ability to critically analyze work produced by other students, and evaluate results of their own creative endeavors.

 

ENG 107-002 Introduction to Imaginative Writing(Satisfies UK CORE Creativity Requirement)

MWF 9:00-9:50am

Dan Howell

This is an introduction to the genres and craft of imaginative writing, including fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Students will read and practice writing in those genres (and possibly others), and work frequently in small groups to develop and critique their writing. Small group work aside, this is primarily a lecture class. Our main text will be Janet Burroway’s Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft (4th ed.). This course fulfills the UK Core requirement for Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity.

 

ENG 142-001,-002,-003 Global Shakespeare (Satisfies UK Core requirement in Global Dynamics)

MW 12:00-12:50pm with Friday discussion sections (see below)

Joyce MacDonald

In this new UK Core course, students will read Shakespeare as he’s played around the world. Even though most of us know his plays through English-language versions, they’ve been produced on every continent except Antarctica, in dozens of languages, and in a range of international cultural contexts. What is there about Shakespeare’s plays that make them such rich raw material for these international encounters? How do his meanings change in non-English speaking countries, in non-Christian cultures, or outside the western world? What is different about global Shakespeare, and what remains familiar in these worldwide treatments of his work?

 

Readings will include 3-4 Shakespeare plays and the same number of their international adaptations; extensive in-class use of video clips and complete film versions of selected global Shakespeare plays on library reserve. Students will complete four quizzes, two exams, and submit short written responses.

 

ENG 142 fulfills UK Core requirements in the humanities and in global dynamics. It has no prerequisites and requires no foreign languages. The course may also count towards the English minor.

 

ENG 142 Discussion Sections:

001: F 10:00-10:50am Kyle W. Eveleth

002: F 12:00-12:50pm Kyle W. Eveleth

003: F 1:00-1:50pm Kyle W. Eveleth

 

ENG 168-001 All That Speak of Jazz: an Intellectually Inquiry in Jazz and Democracy (Satisfies UK CORE Citizenship Requirement)

MW 4:00-5:15pm

DaMaris Hill

This course is designed to be a hybrid cultural studies seminar and creative composition course that explores jazz theory as a philosophical artistic practice rooted in American democracy. This course will explore jazz aesthetics as a literary, visual, and musical art form. It will also examine theories of jazz composition as philosophical statements that are in direct conversation with the principles of US democracy.

 

The course will also discuss the philosophical and aesthetic relationship that connects jazz art (particularly literature) to surrealist and existentialist artistic movements in modern and postmodern cultural contexts. Artists, some of who may be considered marginalized citizens, to be discussed include James Baldwin, Harryette Mullen, and others. The theoretical aspects of this course will demonstrate how jazz has been a source of inspiration for a variety of twentieth-century literatures and theoretical practices. The readings will be selections of fiction, poetry, drama, and essays with emphasis on jazz literary modes, creative trends, and political connotations specific to African American literature and culture.

 

ENG 180-001 Great Movies: Performing to Survive

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Walter Foreman

In this course we will watch a series of movies in which actors play characters who find that in order to get on in life, to fulfill their desires, or even to survive they must become actors to an audience, players of roles, performers, people they are not . . . at least at first. Some succeed and some do not, and the roles have varying relations to their "real" selves. Sometimes the "real" self is lost to the role. Sometmes the role becomes the real self. Sometimes the lines between the role and the self become blurred, with one usurping the other so we can't tell the difference. Titles, from a wide span of film history, will include Monty Python and the Holy Grail, The Stunt Man, Chicago, and Argo; directors will include Buster Keaton, Alfred Hitchock, Arthur Penn, Billy Wilder, and Kenneth Branagh. Intended as a general humanities course for non-majors. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or provide ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit.

 

ENG 191-001 Literature and the Arts of Citizenship (Satisfies UK CORE Citizenship Requirement)

TR 2:00-3:15pm

Holly Osborn

This introductory course explores key aspects of citizenship – rights and responsibilities, belonging and exclusion, allegiance and protest – through a study of contemporary literature and film.  Creative texts depict the complexity of modern life.  We’ll explore these complexities through weekly discussion, a few reflective blog posts, and a collaborative project in which small groups examine a topic of current interest through a collected montage of creative and academic responses. A midterm exam and a final exam over course content are also required.
Broad units of discussion include:  9/11 and its literary representation; participation and protest; technology- and consumer-driven social consciousness; and the pursuit of rights by marginalized or excluded persons.  Each unit of discussion will explore a contemporary literary work and a thematic film representation.
 

 

ENG 207-001 Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Poetry

MWF 11:00-11:50am

Dan Howell

Typically, our class time will be devoted to the following: brief discussions of assigned poems; exercises (solo and group) designed to generate poems; and – primarily--workshop sessions in which we will discuss and critique your poems. So not only will you be expected to read and write, you’ll be expected to talk. You will write and submit twelve poems during the semester, and you will be responsible for annotating and critiquing all poems by your peers. Attendance, participation, and the submission of all poems (on time) will determine your final grade.

 

ENG 207-002 Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction

MWF 1:00-1:50pm

Manuel Gonzales

A beginning workshop in the craft of writing, teaching students how to read critically and how to revise work in progress. The students provide an audience for each others’ work. Exercises involve practice in aspects of craft and promote experimentation with different forms, subjects, and approaches; outside reading provides models and inspiration. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits. Does not fulfill ENG pre-major requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Required for ENG Imaginative Writing Option.

 

ENG 207-003 Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction

TR 2:00-3:15pm

Hannah Pittard

This course is an introduction to the fiction workshop, yes. But its purpose is to help you become not just a better writer, but a better reader as well. To that end, we begin the semester by reading and discussing some of the best examples of contemporary short fiction available (by authors such as Junot Diaz, Stuart Dybek, Sherman Alexie, Alice Munro, etc). During this time, you will develop a vocabulary that will help you learn how to discuss your own work, as well as your peers’.

Of course, you will also have a chance to dip your pens in the ink and further try out this genre for yourself. Over the semester you’ll write four short fiction exercises and two full-length stories. You’ll read published pieces; critique your classmates’ original writing; and have your own writing reviewed by your classmates. You’ll leave this course with an appreciation for the rewards and challenges of fiction writing, exposure to several new writers to read and admire, and a portfolio of original writing of your own.

 

ENG 207-004 Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction

TR 3:30-4:45pm

Andrew Ewell

This course is an introduction to fiction writing, whose ambition stems from the assumption that good readers make good writers. Over the semester, you’ll read published stories, compose brief creative writing exercises as well as complete short stories, and critique your classmates’ original writing and have your own writing reviewed by your peers. You’ll leave with an appreciation for the rewards and challenges of creative writing, exposure to a number of the short story’s finest practitioners, familiarity with the techniques and terminology of the writer’s craft, and a portfolio of original work.

 

ENG 207-005 Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction

R 5:00-7:30pm

Andrew Ewell

This course is an introduction to fiction writing, whose ambition stems from the assumption that good readers make good writers. Over the semester, you’ll read published stories, compose brief creative writing exercises as well as complete short stories, and critique your classmates’ original writing and have your own writing reviewed by your peers. You’ll leave with an appreciation for the rewards and challenges of creative writing, exposure to a number of the short story’s finest practitioners, familiarity with the techniques and terminology of the writer’s craft, and a portfolio of original work.

 

ENG 207-006 Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Poetry

W 5:00-7:30pm

Julia Johnson

This class is devoted to creative writing by you and by others. It is a workshop-based class. You will be given writing assignments and readings designed to unleash your creativity and spark your powers of observation, imagination, and memory. We will discuss the art and craft of writing poetry, and we will workshop one another's work with enthusiasm and care. We will read an extensive amount of work by modern and contemporary poets. Coursework will include poetry writing exercises, six revised poems, active participation, comments on the work of your peers, responses to selected readings, and a final portfolio of revised work.

 

ENG 209-001 The Structure and Use of English (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement)

MWF 2:00-2:50pm

Annabelle Bruno

A general survey of the history, structure, and use of the English language. Topics investigated include: the history of the English language; elements of the structure of English; the distinctive characteristics of spoken and written English and the varied registers of English; the diversity of the English lexicon; regional and social dialects of English and their representation in literature and film; and the ideological dimensions of English language use, especially those relating to social and political issues and controversies. (Same as LIN 209)

 

ENG 210-001 History of the English Language

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Mark Lauersdorf

A survey of the historical development of English from its Indo-European origins to the present. Includes an investigation of the principal changes which have affected English phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and vocabulary, and of the ways in which these changes are reflected in contemporary English usage; and an examination of the socio-historical factors that have shaped the evolution of the English language. (Same as LIN 210)

 

ENG 210-002 History of the English Language

MWF 9:00-9:50am

Ben Jones

A survey of the historical development of English from its Indo-European origins to the present. Includes an investigation of the principal changes which have affected English phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and vocabulary, and of the ways in which these changes are reflected in contemporary English usage; and an examination of the socio-historical factors that have shaped the evolution of the English language. (Same as LIN 210)

 

ENG 221-001 Introduction to Linguistics I: Theoretical Foundations and Analysis

MWF 9:00-9:50am

Cody Smith

This course is the first semester of an intensive two-course introductory sequence to the scientific study of human language, geared primarily for majors and minors in Linguistics. Through frequent practice of linguistic analysis in the form of problem sets, LIN/ENG 221 will provide students with a core foundation in Linguistics, examining the five components of grammar: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. (Same as LIN 221)

 

ENG 230-001 Introduction to Literature: Vampires and Us (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and the GWR)

MWF 9:00-9:50am

Michael Carter

Blood. Seduction. Sex. Eternal life. What more could describe the allure of the vampire in today’s popular culture? From the folktales of the Carpathian mountains in Eastern Europe, and early 19th century literature comes one of the most enduring creatures to capture the audiences: vampire, Dracula, night walkers. This undead creature has its roots in folklore, and in Romanian history with Vlad Tepis (Vlad Dracula), or Vlad the Impaler, and has found its way into short stories and novels, early and recent films, and television. This class will examine the roots and the ongoing literature, film and television that indeed give the vampire eternal life. Quizzes, a mid-term exam, and a few short writings and discussions are the expectations for the class work.

 

ENG 230-002 Introduction to Literature: Banned Books: From Mid-19th Century to Today (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 11:00-11:50am

Michael Carter

Why are school districts and some parents afraid of Harry Potter, Huckleberry Finn or others? Why are certain works and their characters’ words either avoided or expurgated to gain admittance into the corridors of high schools and libraries? This course will read these works and examine the historical and cultural reasons for the books’ being challenged in the past or today. Poems such as Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” and Ginsberg’s “Howl” have rallied opponents to suppress their inclusion in anthologies. We’ll try to redeem or reject these texts through close readings and research into the complaints about the books and into the themes of the texts. Coursework will include readings and two 5-7 essays, one collaborative project, as well as quizzes, midterm and shorter writing assignments.

 

ENG 230-003 Introduction to Literature: Literature and Medicine: The Ailing Body, Medical Theory, and an Introduction to Literature (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 11:00-11:50am

Drew Heverin

For much of our cultural history, a division has separated the science of medicine and the art of literature, but this disciplinary boundary is not as secure as we might believe. The works that we will look at in this section of ENG 230 will investigate this borderland where medicine and art meet. We will look into how literature grapples with questions of illness versus wellness, what the medical theories of the day contributed to the stories we tell about disease, and how authors attempted to understand their bodily selves, whether infected by or immune from what plagued the society at large. From the isolated individual to the larger culture, we will attempt to understand the weakness of the flesh and the communicative nature of infection as medical theory finds its way into the fictional lives and communities of the literary past and present. The texts in this course will cover a wide range of genres and time periods, stretching from the writings of Hippocrates to the novels of Michael Crichton.

 

ENG 230-004 Introduction to Literature: Literature and Medicine: The Ailing Body, Medical Theory, and an Introduction to Literature (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 12:00-12:50pm

Drew Heverin

For much of our cultural history, a division has separated the science of medicine and the art of literature, but this disciplinary boundary is not as secure as we might believe. The works that we will look at in this section of ENG 230 will investigate this borderland where medicine and art meet. We will look into how literature grapples with questions of illness versus wellness, what the medical theories of the day contributed to the stories we tell about disease, and how authors attempted to understand their bodily selves, whether infected by or immune from what plagued the society at large. From the isolated individual to the larger culture, we will attempt to understand the weakness of the flesh and the communicative nature of infection as medical theory finds its way into the fictional lives and communities of the literary past and present. The texts in this course will cover a wide range of genres and time periods, stretching from the writings of Hippocrates to the novels of Michael Crichton.

 

ENG 230-005 Introduction to Literature: Home and Away (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 8:00-9:15am

Alyssa MacLean

This course will introduce students to the study of literature by examining different forms of homecomings—from war, from school, from exile, and from colonial engagements in foreign locations. Over the course of the term we will examine some of the following questions: what is home? How is our subjectivity constructed by our location? How do experiences with “foreign” people and places prompt us (willingly or unwillingly) to re-imagine the self? How are these experiences away from home shaped by class, race, and gender? Is it ever really possible to return “home” from “away”? We will read short stories, poetry, and novels by authors such as Homer (The Odyssey), Lawrence Hill (Someone Knows My Name) and Herman Melville (Typee). As the course progresses we will explore the ways authors represent experiences of conquest, invasion, and exploration in major genres such as the epic and the slave narrative. Coursework will include three papers, participation assignments, and a final exam.

 

ENG 230-006 Introduction to Literature: Literature of the Metropolis (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 9:30-10:45am

Patrick Herald

Detroit. New York City. London. Tokyo. An introduction to literary analysis through close reading, analysis, and argumentative writing, our course will focus on literature set in the metropolis. We will examine how diverse authors from the twentieth century, including James Joyce, Ian McEwan, and Anita Desai, have used the metropolis - both in terms of the form and character of these large cities and the effects they have on individuals living in them. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. This course will emphasize student writing, particularly in terms of devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. Class participation will be focused on entering an ongoing discussion of literature.

 

ENG 230-007 Introduction to Literature: Home and Away (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Alyssa MacLean

This course will introduce students to the study of literature by examining different forms of homecomings—from war, from school, from exile, and from colonial engagements in foreign locations. Over the course of the term we will examine some of the following questions: what is home? How is our subjectivity constructed by our location? How do experiences with “foreign” people and places prompt us (willingly or unwillingly) to re-imagine the self? How are these experiences away from home shaped by class, race, and gender? Is it ever really possible to return “home” from “away”? We will read short stories, poetry, and novels by authors such as Homer (The Odyssey), Lawrence Hill (Someone Knows My Name) and Herman Melville (Typee). As the course progresses we will explore the ways authors represent experiences of conquest, invasion, and exploration in major genres such as the epic and the slave narrative. Coursework will include three papers, participation assignments, and a final exam.

 

ENG 230-008 Introduction to Literature: Literature of the Metropolis (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Patrick Herald

Detroit. New York City. London. Tokyo. An introduction to literary analysis through close reading, analysis, and argumentative writing, our course will focus on literature set in the metropolis. We will examine how diverse authors from the twentieth century, including James Joyce, Ian McEwan, and Anita Desai, have used the metropolis - both in terms of the form and character of these large cities and the effects they have on individuals living in them. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. This course will emphasize student writing, particularly in terms of devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. Class participation will be focused on entering an ongoing discussion of literature.

 

ENG 230-009 Introduction to Literature: American Identities (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 12:30-1:45pm

Travis Martin

ENG 230 is an introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence.

 

This course will explore American identities in twentieth-century American poetry, prose, and drama. We will look at groundbreaking texts in conjunction with films and other contemporary media. For example, in discussion board responses students will be asked to find representations of American men (i.e. The Expendables or Fight Club) or women (i.e. Girl, Interrupted or The Hours) and compare them to the primary texts from the class. Our overarching question to answer: What does it mean to be an American? How is “Americanness” performed differently for men, women, and different racial and socioeconomic groups? How can American identities be viewed as works-in-progress and in what direction are they headed? We will examine themes like American resiliency and specific versions of African-American(ness) in W. E. B. Dubois’s The Souls of Black Folk as well as a masculine search for “self” in Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises. Poetry by Edna St. Vincent Millay and others will help us explore American Feminisms, while David Henry Hwang and Edward Albee will help us understand America in the wake of colonialism—the local and global interrelations between populations impacted by imperial politics—and constructions of heteronormativity. Zora Neal Hurston will be our starting point for understanding the voice of the African American Women while Kate Chopin will be our starting point for examining the growth of women’s rights throughout the twentieth century. At the end of the semester, students will feel confident writing and making arguments about literary texts from twentieth century America.

 

ENG 230-010 Introduction to Literature (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 2:00-3:15pm

STAFF

An introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.

 

ENG 230-011 Introduction to Literature: Law and (Dis)Order in Literature (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 3:30-4:45pm

Cheryl Cardiff

This course explores the question of what it means to be human, though in the context of regulatory systems and the regulation of bodies. We will address a variety of questions: Why do we have laws? How do laws shape us? What happens when certain laws by which we abide conflict with one another? We will involve ourselves with the project of investigating these questions by way of texts, film, and other cultural forms as points of reference. As we concentrate on these primary texts, we’ll look to secondary and background literature to help bring some more perspective on them. Special attention will be given to topics such as private versus public duty, and deviance and defiance. Course work include two papers, your active participation in class discussions, and weekly text responses.

 

ENG 230-012 Introduction to Literature: "(Un)Reliable Narrators" (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 10:00-10:50am

Holly Osborn

In this introduction to reading and writing about literature, we’ll explore narration and reliability– the methods by which authors relay information through voice, the critical assessment required of varied narrative structures, and, ultimately, the exploration of narrative reliability as a study in perspective, in self-presentation, in positionality and bias that pervades all other forms of reading and knowledge acquisition. Students will participate in weekly discussion, write two essays and sit for two exams. We’ll look at short stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Ambrose Bierce, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kate Chopin, and Charles Chesnutt, as well as longer works such as James’s The Turn of the Screw (1898), Wilder’s “Our Town” (1938), Butler’s Kindred (1979), Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower (1999), and Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go (2005).

 

ENG 230-013 Introduction to Literature: "(Un)Reliable Narrators" (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 1:00-1:50pm

Holly Osborn

In this introduction to reading and writing about literature, we’ll explore narration and reliability– the methods by which authors relay information through voice, the critical assessment required of varied narrative structures, and, ultimately, the exploration of narrative reliability as a study in perspective, in self-presentation, in positionality and bias that pervades all other forms of reading and knowledge acquisition. Students will participate in weekly discussion, write two essays and sit for two exams. We’ll look at short stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Ambrose Bierce, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kate Chopin, and Charles Chesnutt, as well as longer works such as James’s The Turn of the Screw (1898), Wilder’s “Our Town” (1938), Butler’s Kindred (1979), Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower (1999), and Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go (2005).

 

ENG 242-001,-002,-003 Survey of British Literature II

MW 10:00-10:50am with Friday discussion sections (see below)

Jonathan Allison

A survey of British literature from the 18th century to the 20th century, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the later English literary tradition. Authors covered may include the early and later Romantic movements; novelists and poets of the Victorian period such as Charles Dickens, Alfred Tennyson, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning; the early twentieth-century Modernism of T.S. Eliot and other authors; and much more. Class participation and attendance; quizzes; three papers; final.

 

ENG 242 Discussion Sections:

001: F 9:00-9:50am Tim Storey

002: F 10:00-10:50am Tim Storey

003: F 12:00-12:50pm Tim Storey

 

ENG 252-001 Survey of American Literature II

MWF 12:00-12:50pm

Alan Nadel

This course will look at the major works of American literature—fiction, poetry, and drama—published since the end of the Civil War. We will study how they reflect changing literary and cultural trends, including Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, Expressionism, Imagism, and Postmodernism. We will attend to an author’s characteristic stylistic and thematic traits, especially in regard to the ways in which they reflect their historical moment. The writers whose work we will consider include Whitman, Frost, Eliot, W.C. Williams, Twain, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Hurston, O’Connor, Didion, Pynchon, August Wilson, and Tennessee Williams, and Stephen Crane.  There will be three take-home exams, several short quizzes, and a final.

 

ENG 260-001 Introduction to Black Writers (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 10:00-10:50am

Julie Naviaux

This course seeks to introduce students to the history of African American and African Diaspora literature through novels, plays, poetry, and short fiction. The material focuses different understandings of black experiences, life, and motivations in relation to history, culture, and the literary legacy. By examining how the literature reflects contemporaneous issues concerning black life, we will study how black literary themes presented throughout the last 200 years have a ripple effect all the way to our world today. We work with the “heavy hitters” of African, Caribbean, and African American literary world to understand traditional constructs of the tradition of black literature. By examining these texts, we’ll develop an understanding of critical and public reception when they were published, how they influence and are influenced by other black writers, and why they now are considered canonical texts. Major assignments include three essays, a class presentation, and a final exam.

 

ENG 260-002 Introduction to Black Writers (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 12:00-12:50pm

Julie Naviaux

This course seeks to introduce students to the history of African American and African Diaspora literature through novels, plays, poetry, and short fiction. The material focuses different understandings of black experiences, life, and motivations in relation to history, culture, and the literary legacy. By examining how the literature reflects contemporaneous issues concerning black life, we will study how black literary themes presented throughout the last 200 years have a ripple effect all the way to our world today. We work with the “heavy hitters” of African, Caribbean, and African American literary world to understand traditional constructs of the tradition of black literature. By examining these texts, we’ll develop an understanding of critical and public reception when they were published, how they influence and are influenced by other black writers, and why they now are considered canonical texts. Major assignments include three essays, a class presentation, and a final exam.

 

ENG 260-003 Introduction to Black Writers (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

T 5:00-7:30pm

Nazera Wright

This course will examine how many texts in the African American literary tradition are coming-of age texts, which are commonly called Bildungsromane. The Bildungsroman came into being in late eighteenth –century Europe as a novelistic form that traces the Bildung - the formation, education, development, socialization – of a young (white, male) protagonist as he matures and assimilates into the dominant norms of his society. This course will explore how African American authors appropriate the Bildungsroman and used the genre as a platform of protest to expose the racial, social and political conditions that robbed protagonists of a happy childhood. By examining critical strategies and aesthetics in a variety of texts, students will develop a deeper understanding of the Bildungsroman, discover whether authors accept or challenge the linearity of the genre’s conventions, and determine how gender qualifies representations of development. Required readings include the following: Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), W. E. B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk (1903), Nella Larsen, Passing (1929), Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes were Watching God (1937) Richard Wright, Uncle Tom’s Children (1938), Gwendolyn Brooks, Maud Martha (1953), James Baldwin, Go Tell it on the Mountain (1953), and Toni Morrison, Sula (1973). In addition to a careful reading of each primary text, each student will be required to participate substantively during class discussions, give a group presentation and lead discussion of one primary text, and write a midterm paper (5-6 pages) and a final research paper (8-10 pages).

 

ENG 265-001 Survey of African-American Literature I

TR 2:00-3:15pm

Nazera Wright

In this course, the first of a two-part sequence offered on African American literary and cultural studies, we will examine the work of foundational writers, thinkers and activists of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. We will read novels, poetry, autobiographies, speeches, and articles from black newspapers, magazines, and conduct manuals by some of the best-known early Black authors. For each text, students will assess the venue of publication, consider thematic scope, and interrogate political and ideological aims. Among the topics that we will discuss are citizenship, race, feminism, masculinity, interior consciousness, and the emergence of the New Negro. We will explore important critical and theoretical essays that evaluate the concerns of the literary texts. Required readings include the following: Phillis Wheatley, Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (1773), Solomon Northup, 12 Years a Slave (1853), Harriet Wilson, Our Nig (1859), Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), Frances E. W. Harper Trial and Triumph (1888-1889), Charles Chesnutt, The Conjure Woman and other Conjure Tales (1899), and W. E. B. DuBois The Souls of Black Folk (1903).  We will watch Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave (2013). In addition to a careful reading of each primary text, each student will be required to participate substantively during class discussions, give a group presentation and lead discussion of one primary text, and write a midterm paper (5-6 pages) and a final research paper (8-10 pages).

 

ENG 274-001 Classics of Western Literature

MWF 1:00-1:50pm

Michael Trask

The greatest hits of the Western literary tradition from Homer to Shakespeare. We’ll read parts of the Iliad and all of the (much more fun) Odyssey; Sophocles’ weird and brilliant Oedipus the King (who paid for that wedding?); Aeschylus’ Oresteia (highly seasoned with vengeful husband-killing and even more vengeful matricide); and Euripides’ Bacchae (the one where the mom leads a pack of crazed women in dismembering her son, just to please a bratty deity). We’ll spend a few classes on Virgil’s by turns dull and fascinating Aeneid (we’ll read the good parts). Then we’ll fast forward a bit from the antics of antiquity to the second millennium A.D., where we’ll read Dante’s ghoulish and gorgeous Inferno (the great epic of a man so attached to his girlfriend that he stalks her all the way through the afterlife); Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream (the one where all the mortals get drugged into partying); and Hamlet (the one where everybody lies and everybody dies). We’ll also look at some of the signature prose statements of all these periods: a Platonic dialogue or two, snippets of Augustine’s Confessions, and the most brilliant work of political theory ever written, Machiavelli’s The Prince. Look to take two major exams (a midterm and final) as well as two brief paper (or paper-like) assignments.

 

ENG 280-001 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 10:00-10:50am

Rachael Hoy

This class will introduce students to the practice of critically analyzing, and writing about, film, treating film as a unique language with which to tell stories and understand human experience. Together, we will study the basics elements of filmmaking, such as film style, mise-en-scène, cinematography, film editing, and film sound. The class will view a wide range of films, from the classic to the contemporary, the humorous to the dramatic, and the crowd-pleasing to the difficult. Through viewings and discussions of these and other films, students will be encouraged to explore their interest in film while developing critical writing and presentation skills over the course of the semester. All films will be viewed outside of class.

 

ENG 280-002 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 11:00-11:50am

Rachael Hoy

This class will introduce students to the practice of critically analyzing, and writing about, film, treating film as a unique language with which to tell stories and understand human experience. Together, we will study the basics elements of filmmaking, such as film style, mise-en-scène, cinematography, film editing, and film sound. The class will view a wide range of films, from the classic to the contemporary, the humorous to the dramatic, and the crowd-pleasing to the difficult. Through viewings and discussions of these and other films, students will be encouraged to explore their interest in film while developing critical writing and presentation skills over the course of the semester. All films will be viewed outside of class.

 

ENG 280-003 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 11:00-11:50am

Ashley Bourgeois

This course introduces film as a cultural and narrative text. Students will learn to watch, speak about, and write about film by engaging such fundamental film concepts as genre, cinematography, sound, editing and mise-en-scene. In addition, this section will explore ways in which writers, directors and actors construct the social category of “other” through film. Questions we seek to answer include: What is “othering” and what social/historical/cultural purpose does it serve? In what ways does film help to define, regulate and perpetuate social norms through visions of the “other?” And finally, why is historical familiarity so crucial to understanding film? To answer these, we will move across a broad historical range of film texts, and multiple genres including western, blaxploitation, comedy, musical and dramatic film.

 

ENG 280-004 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 12:00-12:50pm

Armando Prats

I know that you don’t need to be “introduced” to film—not the way that you might need to be introduced to Chaucer or Milton, or to Faulkner or Joyce—but this version of ENG 280 will introduce you to the study of the movies, that is, to their history, their methods, their thematic and artistic possibilities. Early in the semester we will study silent movies, and will let the genius of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton guide us. We will then shift to early “talkies,” both American (Citizen Kane and The Maltese Falcon) and foreign (Rashomon and Yojimbo—with a quick nod to Clint Eastwood and Sergio Leone—and The Seventh Seal and Nights of Cabiria and Blowup). Thereafter we will study a genre (the Western) by perhaps its greatest director, John Ford, and starring its greatest hero (that would be John Wayne): Stagecoach, Fort Apache, The Searchers, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance. For the final weeks of the semester I’d like to consider your own suggestions—not so much in the spirit of indulgence (or of pandering) but to show you that the movies that you know best can still admit of inclusion in the academic study of film. Assignments: quizzes, three short papers, a final (both multiple-choice and essay). Attendance required.

 

ENG 280-005 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

MWF 1:00-1:50pm

Dan Howell

This is a basic introduction to the study of film, which includes film history as well as elements of film form such as mise-en-scène, cinematography, sound, editing, film genres, and the narrative structures of films. Each of those subjects brings with it an array of terms that we’ll use when discussing and analyzing films; our required text, The Film Experience (3nd. ed.), will be the source of those terms and a resource for explanations and illustrations, supplemented by the frequent in-class screening of clips, trailers, and shorts (even a cartoon or two). But our primary focus will be 12-13 feature-length films that range across time -- from the 1920s to this year -- and genres (comedy, horror, western, crime etc.). There will be at least one silent film, one foreign film, several black-and-white films, and R-rated films; all will be screened twice on the day before we discuss them, and all will be on reserve in the library. Each week will feature a different film, and by the end of the semester you will have seen some of the world’s great films, plus you’ll be acquainted with many film artists and films that are new to you -- you’ll be a much more sophisticated filmgoer. Your grade for the course will be based on weekly short quizzes, two essays totaling fifteen pages, a midterm exam and a final exam.

 

ENG 280-006 Introduction to Film: Fight the Power! (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 8:00-9:15am

Eric Casero

Taking a cue from Public Enemy and Spike Lee, this class will focus on films that showcase the struggles of individuals as they fight against governments, organizations, bureaucracies, and other groups in power. We will see Brooklynites struggle against their own neighbors in Lee’s Do the Right Thing, we will watch a classic tale of Western revenge in Once Upon a Time in the West, and we will watch two young men fight to make it in the world of pro basketball in Hoop Dreams, among other films.

 

This class will introduce students to the practice of critically analyzing, and writing about, film, treating film as a unique language with which to tell stories and understand human experience. The class will view a wide range of films, from the classic to the contemporary, the humorous to the dramatic, and the crowd-pleasing to the difficult. Through viewings and discussions of these and other films, students will be encouraged to explore their interest in film while developing critical writing and presentation skills over the course of the semester.

 

ENG 280-007 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 9:30-10:45am

Walter Foreman

This section of ENG 280 is an introduction to the study of the movies as a narrative art and a cultural document, with emphasis on the former. The movies we will watch will be chosen from a variety of genres, national cinemas, and time periods. The course will develop students' skills in interpretation and analysis of film and in evaluating competing interpretations of films. The "evaluation" of movies we will do will not be about assigning stars or pointing thumbs up or down, nor will the evaluation of interpretations necessarily be designed to accept one and reject its competitors. All the movies for this section will feature an Unexpected Adventure. The central character or characters are going about their "normal" lives when they suddenly find themselves in another story, full of novelty and of danger . . . but also offering an opportunity to grow, to discover their capabilities, to develop relationships with others, that their earlier stories had not. Most of our characters (but not all) seize these opportunities, either by choice or by necessity. The stories will examine their fitness for adventure, their physical, moral, intellectual, and spiritual resources and powers, their capacities for collaboration where survival depends on it, their abilities to live in a "new" world, and the consequences of success or failure—and how to tell these apart.

 

ENG 280-008 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

T 5:00-7:30pm

Leah Hutchison Toth
In this introductory course we will study the basics of filmmaking in our exploration of various genres, including drama, romantic comedy, and the American western, among others. Students will view a wide selection of films and will learn to discuss the uniquely visual and aural narrative components of the medium. We will discuss elements such as film style, mise-en-scène, cinematography, film editing, and film sound. Major assignments include two essays, two exams, and quizzes based on screening assignments and readings from our required textbook. There will be a strong emphasis on student writing, particularly devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence.

 

ENG 280-009 Introduction to Film: Fight the Power! (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Eric Casero

Taking a cue from Public Enemy and Spike Lee, this class will focus on films that showcase the struggles of individuals as they fight against governments, organizations, bureaucracies, and other groups in power. We will see Brooklynites struggle against their own neighbors in Lee’s Do the Right Thing, we will watch a classic tale of Western revenge in Once Upon a Time in the West, and we will watch two young men fight to make it in the world of pro basketball in Hoop Dreams, among other films.

 

This class will introduce students to the practice of critically analyzing, and writing about, film, treating film as a unique language with which to tell stories and understand human experience. The class will view a wide range of films, from the classic to the contemporary, the humorous to the dramatic, and the crowd-pleasing to the difficult. Through viewings and discussions of these and other films, students will be encouraged to explore their interest in film while developing critical writing and presentation skills over the course of the semester.

 

ENG 280-010 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Christina Williams

This class is an introduction to film as a narrative form. Students will learn how to critically analyze and write about film as a unique language with which to tell stories and understand human experience. We will build a vocabulary to describe mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, film genres, and the narrative structures of film. Students should expect to view a wide range of films from the very beginnings of the medium to the present, including some films in foreign languages with English subtitles. Students will engage with familiar films in unfamiliar ways to understand cinema as part of an ever-expanding media landscape. Please note: All films will be viewed outside of class.

 

ENG 280-011 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 12:30-1:45 pm

Randall Roorda
This introduction to film features Hollywood movies from their inception to nearly the present day. You'll watch a movie a week, write responses to what you watch, take some quizzes, and write a couple short papers. Don't take this class if you can't stand black-and-white!

 

ENG 280-012 Introduction to Film: American Cinema and the City (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 12:30-1:45pm

Matthew Godbey

This course will introduce students to the language and aesthetics of cinema by examining images of the city in American films throughout the 20th and 21st Centuries. Using specific films as case studies, students will learn how to examine cinematic representation within specific historical, cultural, and political contexts. More specifically, the films will serve as a starting point for conversations about cities and urban society and the relationship between film and the urban experience. Our readings throughout this semester will focus on the art, economy, and politics of cinema, which will help us to deepen our appreciation for the ways motion pictures are constructed and make meaning, and to tackle issues dealing with the urban experience throughout American history.

 

ENG 280-013 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 2:00-3:15pm

Alyssa MacLean

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of film analysis through the theme of memory and the self. We will examine some of the following questions: how do we understand the connection between memory and identity? How have scholars understood different kinds of memory (for example, private vs. public memory, nostalgia, or forms of traumatic memory like flashbacks) and how are these forms of memory represented visually? How is memory shaped by power structures? We will analyze films such as Citizen Kane (Orson Welles), Being John Malkovich (Spike Jonze), Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock), Memento (Christopher Nolan), The Grand Budapest Hotel (Wes Anderson), and The Limey (Steven Soderbergh). Coursework will include three papers, participation assignments (including quizzes), and a final exam. Students will be expected to screen films outside of class.

 

ENG 280-014 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 2:00-3:15pm

Leah Hutchison Toth
In this introductory course we will study the basics of filmmaking in our exploration of various genres, including drama, romantic comedy, and the American western, among others. Students will view a wide selection of films and will learn to discuss the uniquely visual and aural narrative components of the medium. We will discuss elements such as film style, mise-en-scène, cinematography, film editing, and film sound. Major assignments include two essays, two exams, and quizzes based on screening assignments and readings from our required textbook. There will be a strong emphasis on student writing, particularly devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence.

 

ENG 280-015 Introduction to Film (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 3:30-4:45pm

Christina Williams

This class is an introduction to film as a narrative form. Students will learn how to critically analyze and write about film as a unique language with which to tell stories and understand human experience. We will build a vocabulary to describe mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, film genres, and the narrative structures of film. Students should expect to view a wide range of films from the very beginnings of the medium to the present, including some films in foreign languages with English subtitles. Students will engage with familiar films in unfamiliar ways to understand cinema as part of an ever-expanding media landscape.

 

ENG 290-001 Introduction to Women’s Literature (Satisfies UK CORE Intellectual Inquiry in Humantities Requirement and GWR)

TR 12:30-1:45pm

Cheryl Cardiff

This is an introductory course that aims to examine representations of women in literature, as told by women writers. To give us a grasp of such writings, texts will range from the imaginative literature to nonfiction, from literary fiction to chick lit. As we concentrate on these primary texts, we’ll look to secondary and background literature to help bring some more perspective on them. Special attention will be given to topics such as mother-daughter relationships, female (un)bonding, and sexuality. Coursework includes: active participation in class discussions, brief text responses, and two analytical essays. Sample texts: Mary Wollstonecraft, The Wrongs of Woman; William Wyler's Little Foxes based on Lillian Hellman's play and screenplay; Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero; Jean Kwok's, Girl in Translation. Course work include two papers, your active participation in class discussions, and creative studio responses to issues covered in the course.

 

ENG 301-001 Style for Writers (cross-listed with WRD 301)

MWF 2:00-2:50pm

Brandy Scalise

This course is designed for students who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others.  While the course may include some account of historical changes in prose style and require some stylistic analysis of literary texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students’ own writing.  Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination, subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace.  Prereq:  Completion of Composition and Communication requirement and consent of instructor.

 

ENG 310-001 American English

TR 9:30-10:45am

Jennifer Cramer

This course provides a thorough examination of the varieties of modern American English, including regional, social, and ethnic varieties, gender differences in communication, pidgins and creoles, and stylistic variation. Students will be exposed to the history and methods of the study of American dialects through course lectures and through first-hand experiences with linguistic data. (Same as LIN 310)

 

ENG 330-001 Text and Context: The Grapes of Wrath  (satisfies GCCR)

MWF 10:00-10:50am

Michael Carter

John Steinbeck combines much of the confusion of 20th century American culture in his many works from non-fiction reporting to novels of the American West and the misfits he found there. His merging of realism and modernism exhibits his despair with the disappearing American Dream that shows in his writing in which he depicts the social outcasts, immigrants, common laborers, and traditional rural values. Is he a radical socialist? Is he a misogynist? Is he something else? We will read a variety of his works from the 1930s (focusing on The Grapes of Wrath) and try to discover the Nobel Prize writer and ourselves among his characters and their words and actions. We will write three shorter essays, have a midterm examination, and write one longer essay. Grades will be determined by these written tasks, attendance, participation, and by your preparation for each class meeting.

 

ENG 330-002 Text and Context: Moby Dick (satisfies GCCR)

MWF 11:00-11:50am

Armando Prats

Just because. Because somebody has to . . . to read It, to glory in It (and not seldom to curse It), to learn not just about It but from It; to try to understand It, to honor It. Because It is the greatest fish story ever told (how many times do you think It’s been called a whale of a story?). Because It’s a “text” that provides its own “context”—book and whale, book and universe, book and life, life as book, living as reading, reading life. Because Matilda read it at a tender age and recommends it; and because Homer Simpson didn’t read it and doesn’t know what he’s talking about. Because you know you shouldn’t graduate without having read It: It will round out your education, viz., It’s respectable, good cocktail-party conversation, impeccable source of bragging rights, a sure way to impress parents, boyfriends and girlfriends, small children, and even pets (who might, after all, root for the whale)—and, yes, prospective employers. Because It’s there—Himalayan, massive, magnificent and sublime, impenetrable, unconquered, forever beckoning, slippery, fishy even. Because (does j. starp carp? does namerof scoff?) It is your American King Lear and your Tempest, (and might therefore just make Ishmael kin to Hamlet, what with the “hypos” and all). Because It will transport your spirit, will haunt your sleep, will improve your daydreams, will change your life—and, just perhaps, because It will give to you—magnanimously yet humbly—the Beauty, the Truth, and the Goodness for which you may have forgotten to ask. (Required: curiosity, delight in reading, attendance, student-led discussions, quizzes, journals. Not easy but rewarding.)

 

ENG 330-003 Text and Context: 1984  (satisfies GCCR)

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Jonathan Allison

A course on the great modern novel, George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), read in the context of other writings by Orwell, including Animal Farm, The Road to Wigan Pier, Why I Write, and various essays. To provide a wider context we shall also read Thomas More’s Utopia and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. Other contexts to explore include biographical, historical and political backgrounds. Relevant supplementary readings will be provided. We shall think about the critical reception of the novel, how it has been read over the last half century, and how its influence may be discerned in the work of contemporary writers and in the culture at large. Class participation and attendance; quizzes; three papers; final.

 

ENG 330-004 Text and Context: Robinson Crusoe and its Afterlife (satisfies GCCR)

TR 12:30-1:45pm

Mike Genovese

Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, published in 1719, is widely regarded as the first novel. In many ways, it gave birth to prose fiction as we still know it today: as a story that takes place in a familiar, realistic world occupied by people doing things we recognize as everyday. But what is familiar? Realistic? Everyday? Are people and characters even the same thing? As we study Defoe’s novel, we will stretch into its literary past and future in order to explore these questions and come to terms with what it meant to be the “first” novel and what it still means to be a novel today. We will read novels by Defoe as well as works selected from the following novelists: Bunyan, Haywood, Coetzee, and Joyce. There will also be regular reading of critical and theoretical essays related these novels. Expect approximately 120 pages of reading per week, as well as about 20 pages of writing. Active participation is required, and there will be a cumulative final exam.

 

ENG 337-001 Literature and Genre: Graphic Novel

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Matthew Godbey

This course will introduce students to an emerging genre in contemporary American literature: the graphic novel. To do so, we will focus less on the history of genre and more on its form, reading a variety of contemporary graphic novels that represent the genre’s breadth and diversity. Students can expect to read such works as Art Spiegelman’s Maus I and II, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, Charles Burns’ Black Hole, as well as selections from Chris Ware, Adrian Tomine, and other contemporary artists/writers.

 

Students will explore the aesthetics of sequential narrative and consider the graphic novel’s place in contemporary literary and popular culture. Among the questions we will be asking are: What is the grammar of comics and how does its mode of simultaneous seeing and reading complicate conventional approaches to reading literature? Can graphic novels become literature? As well, we will examine these graphic novels in the broader context of American literature and culture, with an eye toward continuing to develop and improve the core skills of literary analysis, critical thinking, and argumentative writing.

 

ENG 341-001 Chaucer and His Contemporaries

TR 9:30-10:45am

Matt Giancarlo

A course covering medieval English literature from around the years 1350-1450 and centering on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1340-1400), particularly his early dream-visions and The Canterbury Tales. Other authors and texts may include William Langland’s Piers Plowman; the poetry of John Gower; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and the works of the Pearl-Poet; Thomas Hoccleve; Margery Kempe; anonymous romances and Arthurian narratives; and more. Topics include courtly love and chivalry; Christian spirituality; women and gender roles; feudal politics and rebellion.

 

ENG 345-001 British Poetry: The Romantics

TR 2:00-3:15pm

Mike Genovese

Beginning in the 1780s, a transformation began in British poetry. Breaking from the patterns of the past and forging ahead with visionary, even revolutionary, ideas, poets began exploring topics and forms that had drawn little interest in the preceding decades. At stake was the right of the individual to interpret his or her own world and express with authority his or her own perspective on that world. As Wordsworth wrote, his principal object “was to choose incidents and situations from common life,” and in this class we will explain how poetry by him and his contemporaries draws out the extraordinary that lies in the ordinary. Authors will include: Blake, Smith, Coleridge, Barbauld, Shelley, Keats, L.E.L., and Byron. Each day will require a reading of 3-4 lyric poems, and there will be regular 2-3 page analytical papers scattered throughout the semester.

 

ENG 353-001 American Literature and Cultures Post-1900: Contemporary American Fiction

MW 4:00-5:15pm

Michael Trask

An examination of American fiction since around 1980 as well as the categories by which its critics and readers have sought to identify it: minimalism, hyperrealism, postmodernism, cyberpunk, the magical real. The class will begin by pairing the work of two influential and seemingly opposed authors of short fiction—Raymond Carver and Donald Barthelme—in order to generate the key terms and problems for approaching work by writers of diverse genres, from science fiction and graphic novels to historical novels and self-consciously “literary” fiction. We shall read novels and short fiction by Marilynne Robinson, William Gibson, Cormac McCarthy, Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, Charles Burns, Jhumpa Lahiri, George Saunders, Nicholson Baker, and Richard Powers. Requirements other than reading include two short (5pg) papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

 

ENG 369-001 African American Women's Writing

TR 9:30-10:45am

Rynetta Davis

English 369 investigates representations of black womanhood in nineteenth- and twentieth-century black women writers’ literary texts. Reading an antebellum narrative, political tracts, essays, novels, short stories, poetry, and plays, we will examine how black women writers from the Antebellum Era through the contemporary period entered the print public sphere, and in their writing, responded to injustices such as exploitive labor practices, political disenfranchisement, interracial violence, and rape. To facilitate these inquiries, our reading list includes a mix of canonical, non-canonical, underappreciated, and recently rediscovered black women’s literary texts.

 

ENG 370-001 Literature Across Borders

MWF 10:00-10:50am

Peter Kalliney

What is the relationship between travel, knowledge, power, and the act of writing? What does the act of traveling to "another" culture tell us about "our own" culture; conversely, how does our own culture prepare us for the experience of travel? How does writing about travel force us to define, question, and rethink some of our basic cultural categories such as "familiar" and "different," domestic and foreign? In this course, we will be reading fictional travel literature from the Anglophone world (composed of the former British empire) to see how different writers use the genre to explore such questions. In the first half of the course, we will read how "British" writers represent the experience of visiting "the colonies"; in the second part of our syllabus, we will read how inhabitants of former colonies depict the trip to Britain.

 

ENG 380-001 Film and Genre: American Literature and Film of the 1950s

MW 4:00-5:15pm

Alan Nadel

This course will examine the ways that American film and literature was productive of and a product of the dominant assumptions and values of post-World War II America, particularly in regard to such issues as class, race, gender, youth, the blossoming, middle class, unions, and religion. We will look six films (Rear Window, The Defiant Ones, Rebel without a Cause, Gigi, On the Waterfront, and The Ten Commandments) and the works we will read include The Catcher in the Rye, Lolita, Invisible Man, “Notes of a Native Son,” Howl, A Raisin in the Sun.

There will be several short quizzes, three take-home exams, a final and a research project.

 

ENG 380-002 Film and Genre: Modern Israeli Society Film and Literature

TR 3:30-4:45pm

Tikva Meroz-Aharoni

Is a successful book going to be a successful film?  Critics describe literature and cinema as two distinct arts that speak two different languages and therefore create different meanings.  One can always go back and read again the lines that one liked, but this would be difficult to do while viewing a film.  Israeli cinema has now achieved worldwide acclaim with movies such as Someone to Run With,  A Woman in Jerusalem and others.  Israeli movie directors often look towards rich Hebrew literature as a source for their scripts.  This course will examine contemporary Israeli movies that deal with major issues in Israeli society such and social justice, religion, the Israeli-Arabic relationship, and others that are based on contemporary Israeli prose or novels.

 

ENG 391-001 Literary Theory

TR 12:30-1:45pm

Matt Giancarlo

Since the 1940’s “literary theory” has emerged as a vibrant and vital aspect of literary studies. The term covers a wide range of formal, historical, and critical approaches to literature and culture that have changed the ways we read. This course investigates selected trends and schools of modern literary theory in diverse texts and contexts. These can include formalism, Practical Criticism, and the New Criticism; French Structuralism and the various modes of post-structuralism (Semiotics, Deconstruction, Reader-response, Speech-act theory); historicism and the New Historicism; as well as broader modes of cultural critique such as Feminism, Marxism, Critical Theory and the Frankfurt School, Post-colonialism, Critical Race Theory, and more.

 

ENG/WRD  401-001 Special Topics in Writing: The History of Hip

TR 12:30-1:45pm

Tom Marksbury

This course positions “hip”—in marked opposition to the popular and increasingly pejorative implications of the word as merely of the moment, fashionable, trendy, ephemeral, even disposable—as an enduring canon, subject to the same laws of evolution, stasis, and fluctuation of any other canon. Hip is a counter-tradition, a shadow of the “official” canon, with its own sources, progenitors, and evolution.  We want to trace those permutations, chart where they have taken us and speculate about where we are going now.
 
       In addition to the central text, which tries to synthesize all manner of phenomena pertaining to “hip”, we will be examining different kinds of artifacts from (mostly) American culture which constitute this canon. We will study the literature of hip, mostly poetry, fiction, and essays.  We will watch films and documentaries and listen to bebop jazz, country and urban blues, and punk rock.  We will experience the visual equivalent of jazz which is Abstract Expressionism, and look into the social and cultural and aesthetic and political histories of such movements as the Harlem Renaissance, the Lost Generation, the Beats, and Andy Warhol’s Factory.  We will laugh (and cry) at the stand-up comedy of Lenny Bruce and Richard Pryor, the cartoon adventures of Bugs Bunny and Fritz the Cat and study underground comix, graphic novels and graffiti.
 
       50 % of your grade will be based on two in-class exams, a mid-term (25%) and a non- comprehensive final (25%).  20  % of your grade will be based on four four-page papers.  Another  20 % of your grade will be based on a project which will be due on the last day of the semester
 
 
 

 

ENG/WRD 401-002 Special Topics in Writing: New Television

TR 9:30-10:45am

Tom Marksbury

It’s not your father’s television anymore.
 
In this course, we will consider, the vibrant, creative, edgy, (and dare I say cinematic) Breaking Bad, The Sopranos, and Mad Men.  We will note the sustained character development, worthy of a nineteenth century novel, of mini-series like True Detective and Top of the Lake.  We’ll revel in the sociopolitical commentary (uncomfortable in the very best way) of The Boondocks, House of Cards, and Homeland  And we will also look into the unique combination of comedy and drama which results in such extraordinary hybrids as Girls and Orange is the New Black.
 
All of this work easily rivals the best of contemporary film, while using the expanded parameters of series TV to play with the narrative conventions , iconography, and structure.  The opportunities to experiment with elision, digression, and closure  are manifest when you have larger blocks and time and different kinds of audience consumption and reception.
 
 In addition to the viewings, we will be working with two primary texts, Difficult Men, by Brett Martin, which documents the rise of what has been called the Third Golden Age of television, and Channels of Discourse Reassembled, edited by Robert Allen, which approached critical approaches to TV from structuralism and genre studies to feminist and postmodern working methods.
 
Forty five percent (45%) of your grade will be based on two exams, a mid-term and a non-comprehensive final. While “reading” the programming in question as closely as possible, we will be looking at both “highbrow” criticism, written with the advantage of hindsight, and popular cultural journalism, or “reviews”, produced more or less contemporaneously with the reception of the original show.
 
Twenty percent (20%) of the final grade, then, will be based on the production of a seven to ten page essay envisioned as a “review”, and twenty-five percent (25%) will be based on ten to twelve page essay conceived more along the lines of “criticism, both of which, while incorporating the material of the class and involving pertinent research, you are encouraged to shape as much to your own concerns as possible.

 

 

ENG 405-001 Editing English Prose (cross-listed with WRD 405)

MWF 11:00-11:50am

Elizabeth Connors Manke

The course includes a broad introduction to best editing practices, as applied in literary, academic, business, and online writing. This course provides students with an introduction to the basics of editing and publishing and build upon prior knowledge of the essential elements of writing and style. Prereq: WRD 301 or consent of instructor.

 

ENG 407-001 Intermediate Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Poetry

R 5:00-7:30pm

Frank X. Walker

In this advanced workshop experienced poets will study the work of contemporary poets and focus on building a self-directed portfolio of new work, fine tuning their voice, and focusing on creating a sustained narrative in a cycle of original poems.

 

ENG 407-002 Intermediate Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction

T 5:00-7:30pm

Hannah Pittard

This is an intermediate fiction writing workshop. Students enrolling in this course should be more or less familiar with the short story form. Workshop will be intense and rigorous. We will, of course, read several examples of contemporary short stories (all plucked freshly from recent or current issues of The New Yorker: think Tessa Hadley, Donald Antrim, Alice Munro, Robert Coover…) We will also read critical excerpts from luminaries such John Gardner, Charles Baxter, Joan Silber, etc. But the focus here will be on developing your craft. Come to class ready to read and ready to write.

Note: Everything you write for this class will be new. Writing done prior to this class or for another class will not be permitted.

 

ENG 425-001 Environmental Writing

MW 3:30-4:45pm

Erik Reece

This course will take up Aldo Leopold’s foundational idea of a land ethic and attempt to apply it to various forms of writing: narrative, reportage, experiential, and polemic. If, as Leopold said, people will not destroy what they love, how do we use writing to make people care enough about natural landscapes that they will want to work to preserve them? This course will work to answer that question. We will focus on how to write with empathy, passion, authority and concreteness. And we will examine how the genre of literary journalism can become a voice for advocacy and activism.

 

ENG 460G-001 Studies in African-American Literature: Love and Sex

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Rynetta Davis

English 460 considers how black writers characterize love, sex, and romantic desire from the slave era to the contemporary era. We will examine how race and gender alter representations of sex, specifically how black women writers such as Harriet Jacobs struggled to mediate stereotypical images of the lascivious black female body both during and after slavery. We will place Jacobs’s literary text, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), in dialogue with other works including Pauline Hopkins’sContending Forces (1900), Nella Larsen’s Quicksand (1928), Wallace Thurman’s The Blacker the Berry (1929), Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937), and Dorothy West’s The Living is Easy (1948). The following questions will guide our analysis of sex in black literary texts: How do black authors represent sex and sexuality? How is sex depicted in African American literary texts? Is sexual desire expressed overtly, or is it repressed and contained?

 

ENG 495-001 Honors Seminar: Narrating War in American Literature

TR 2:00-3:15pm

Pearl James

We will make a historical and critical study of the theme of war and its representation in narrative in a selection of American literary texts. Since Homer and Vergil, war has been a topic of national literature—a topic around which the idea of a nation or culture is articulated and defined. Yet war often resists representation: it may be ugly, it may be violent or traumatic, it may be impossible to witness in its entirety. How does this paradox figure in American literature? We will pay particular attention to how American writers formulate and address the narrative problems that war occasions, in order to better understand the art of narrative itself. We will focus on how historical events make their way into national fiction, and how writing about war figures in the definition of American identity. We will also pay particular attention to gender: does war experience belong to men? How do women narrate war? Does witnessing and writing about war authorize citizenship (for some? for all?)? The course includes readings from various genres and attention to different critical approaches, with a particular focus on narratology.Readings include: The Things They Carried, Tim O’Brien; Sovereignity and Goodness of God, Mary Rowlandson; Blood Meridian, Cormac McCarthy; An Uncommon Soldier, Rebecca Wakefield;Red Badge of Courage, Stephen Crane; Absalom, Absalom! W. Faulkner; and more.

 

Required for graduation with Departmental Honors in English. Prerequisites: ENG major; completion of premajor requirements and ENG 330; ENG major GPA of 3.5 or above. Enrollment limited to junior and senior ENG majors. May be repeated up to 9 hours under different subtitles. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit.

 

ENG 507-001 Advanced Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Creative Non-Fiction

M 5:00-7:30pm

Erik Reece

“Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”  This course will be divided into two sections: Travel writing and writing about the places we come from. Students will learn and employ all the techniques of creative nonfiction to engage the crucial subject of place.

 

ENG 507-002 Advanced Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction

W 5:00-7:30pm

Gurney Norman

This is an advanced course for experienced writers in which students practice short story, novel and experimental fiction writing. The class meetings feature writing exercises in which students display their understanding of various elements of traditional story-writing such as plot development, dialogue, description, character development and point of view. Students are asked to produce during the semester three original, polished short stories or chapters that represent the student’s best effort. Students are invited to read their work aloud in class for discussion but this is not a requirement. The reading component includes selected stories by American, English, and Russian authors.

 

ENG 507-003 Advanced Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Autobiography

T 5:00-7:30pm

Gurney Norman

ENG 507 Autobiography is a creative writing course in which students create narratives based on personal life experiences. Using classic autobiographies as models, students will employ many techniques used by fiction writers, poets, essayists, journalists and historians. Students will also explore innovative or "experimental" narrative techniques. Students will be required to produce a minimum of five pages or two thousand words each week and complete a polished chapter of fifty or more manuscript pages by semesters end. A final exam will test the student's familiarity with the assigned readings.

 

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