Spring Courses

SPRING 2014 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS *[TENTATIVE]*

ENG 107-001  Introduction to Imaginative Writing
MWF 12-12:50
Julia Johnson

An introduction to the genres and craft of imaginative writing, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will study and practice writing in various modes through composition, peer critique, and research. Lecture. Offers credit for the UK Core requirement in Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity. Fulfills ENG premajor requirement and provides ENG minor credit.

 
ENG 107-002  Introduction to Imaginative Writing
TR 9:30-10:45
Cheryl Cardiff
This is an introductory course in creative writing for the novice and curious interested in exploring how poetry and prose can express their ideas. In this class, we will practice a range of written creative expression. Lecture sessions will be devoted partly to “talking craft,” that is, to familiarizing ourselves with various literary and craft elements pertinent to the creative writing genres being practiced and to analyzing how writers employ these elements to put forth a work that captures readers’ imaginations. The other half of our sessions will be devoted to “crafting,” that is, the workshop process that inducts you and fellow beginning writers to experiment with the different creative writing forms studied. ENG107 satisfies the objectives and outcomes delineated by the Intellectual Inquiry into Arts and Creativity of the UKCore Curriculum, the primary emphasis of which is to define and distinguish different approaches to creativity, demonstrate the ability to critically analyze work produced by other students, and evaluate results of their own creative endeavors.
 
 
ENG 130-001  Literary Encounters: Women Behaving Badly
TR 12:30-1:45
Ellen Rosenman

Sometimes being good isn’t much fun. In Women Behaving Badly, we’ll explore films, short stories, poems, and short novels about women who don’t follow social scripts but veer off into different forms of “badness”: sexual misconduct, maternal negligence, social non-conformity, emotional excess, even crime. What motivates them? What do they gain and lose? What can we learn about gender conventions by studying stories that transgress them? We’ll begin by looking at traditional fairy tales as narratives that prescribe good (Cinderella) and bad (wicked stepmother) behavior; read some fairy tales by modern women writers that challenge these stereotypes; and view the recent film Snow White and the Huntsman (with Kristen Stewart and Charlize Theron) to think about where it stands among these works. From there we’ll explore the themes of love, sex, marriage, and the family; ambition, aggression, and competition; and racial and ethnic identity. Some authors include Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath, Angela Carter, Kate Chopin, Nella Larson, Sandra Cisneros, Maxine Hong Kingston. Other films include Thelma and Louise (of course!), Baby Face, and Fatal Attraction; I’ll also ask for suggestions from the class. Expect short writing assignments, a mid-term, and a final.

 
ENG 180-001  Great Movies: The American 70s
MWF 12-12:50
Dan Howell
The decade of the 70s was certainly one of the greatest -- if not the greatest -- in American film history.  This course will feature a dozen movies from that amazing decade, ranging from familiar hits like The Godfather and Chinatown through lesser-known early masterpieces by directors such as Martin Scorsese and Robert Altman, as well as wonderful work from Terence Malick, Peter Bogdanovich, Steven Spielberg, Woody Allen and others.  Obviously you’ll need to know some historical context for the films -- the emergence of youth counter-culture and the war in Vietnam, e.g. -- as well as some film history, and you’ll need to learn some basic terms of film art.  But primarily we’ll be watching great movies, and talking about what we’re seeing, and thinking about how and why the movies work as they do.  Class attendance and participation; weekly short quizzes; a midterm and a final exam.
 
 
ENG 191-001  Lit & Arts of Citizenship
TR 12:30-1:45
Andy Doolen
A survey and investigation of contemporary literature of modern American citizenship, with an emphasis on questions of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and socioeconomic class. Lecture. Offers credit for the UK Core requirements in either U.S. Citizenship or Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
 
ENG 207-001  Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Poetry
MWF 9-9:50
Dan Howell
A beginning workshop in the craft of writing, teaching students how to read critically and how to revise work in progress. The students provide an audience for each others’ work. Exercises involve practice in aspects of craft and promote experimentation with different forms, subjects, and approaches; outside reading provides models and inspiration. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Required for ENG Imaginative Writing Option.
  
 
ENG 207-002  Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Poetry
MWF 10-10:50
Dan Howell
A beginning workshop in the craft of writing, teaching students how to read critically and how to revise work in progress. The students provide an audience for each others’ work. Exercises involve practice in aspects of craft and promote experimentation with different forms, subjects, and approaches; outside reading provides models and inspiration. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Required for ENG Imaginative Writing Option.
 
 
ENG 207-004 Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Non-Fiction
TR 8-9:15
Cheryl Cardiff
How do we distinguish fact from fiction? Fiction from fact? What criteria do we as a reading public create to categorize the two? What are the ethics of truth-telling? This course aims to have students reflect upon the stability of fiction and nonfiction, as genre and as writing techniques. We will explore some of the techniques writers have used in order to push the envelope in both story- and truth-telling. Sample texts: Cheryl Strayed, Wild; JT Leroy, The Heart is Deceitful Above All Things; Abigail Thomas, A Three Dog Life. One analytical paper, writing exercises, and at least one creative work.
 
 
ENG 207-005  Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction
TR 12:30-1:45
Cheryl Cardiff

DEAR AUTHOR: THIS COURSE INTRODUCES YOU to the forms and practices of creative writing. Focusing on each individual, our workshop will develop the skill in writing stories and/or personal narratives. To help foster your work, weekly exercises will help you develop an understanding of the elements of the craft such as character development, narrative structure, dialogic engagement, and scene development. You also will be expected to read peer work with care and to discuss this writing with constructive, informed, and articulate criticism to specific elements of the text that go beyond simple like and dislike. The study of works by writers such as Annie Proulx, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Wallace Stegner in the context of craft—as opposed to literary interpretation or historical analysis—is a critical part of your artistic discipline and creative output. The main feature of the course is (of course) THE WORKSHOP itself, and you will have the opportunity to provide stories for peer evaluation three times over the course of the semester. Vital to writing is re-writing, of returning to your work and sculpting it into the shape you wish it to take. For your efforts, you will have the opportunity to further develop one workshopped piece for a second round of peer and instructor critique. As you practice becoming an effective and careful reader of both peer and established writing, you do become an effective and careful reader of your own. Writing, reading, and evaluating peer work all further your own creative practice. By the end of the term, you will feature your two workshopped stories and your choice of three shorter “best effort” writing exercises in a portfolio that you can be proud of, and one day, pass on to future progeny and fans.

 
ENG 207-007  Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Digital Spaces
MW 4-5:15
DaMaris Hill
Beginner's Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Creative Writing in Digital Spaces is a creative writing workshop and course that explores creative composition and literary arts in digital spaces. This course will introduce or reintroduce students to the intersections of technology and literature by surveying literature and creative expression in digital spaces. This class will create and explore the different theories and mediums authors may employ in digital spaces. The course will challenge students to critique works of poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction in digital spaces. The course will also discuss how and why authors choose to express themselves using multimedia and texts in digital environments. The course will emphasize the constraints and freedoms associated with digital composition and literary practices. Mediums and genres to be discussed include digital story telling, online literary journals, blogs, vlogs, Twitter, tumblr, Facebook, and electronic literature source. This course will also require students to create a portfolio of digital writing. The theoretical aspects of this course will demonstrate how digital writing and tools serve as a source of inspiration for a variety of twenty-first century literatures.
 
 
ENG 207-401  Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction
T 5-7:30
Gurney Norman
ENG 207-401 is an introductory course in the ancient art of story-making. Through attention to each student's own original writing, terms such as plot, characterization, story structure, dialogue, point of view, rising action, resolution, denouement, and summary narrative become familiar. As part of regular classroom discussions, the course explores different genres and styles of fiction writing such as the short story, novel, and contemporary digital fiction. Each class meeting features writing exercises designed to spark the imagination and to create short passages that may be useful in longer stories. Additionally, students are expected to create two complete, original short stories or chapters of a book during the semester. With chairs arranged in a circle, students are invited to read their work aloud to an audience of fellow students, but this is not required. The course also features readings and discussions of stories by Anton Chekhov, Charles Chestnut, Raymond Carver, Crystal Wilkinson, Bobbie Ann Mason, and other writers.
 
 
ENG/LIN 209-001  The Structure and Use of English
MWF 3-3:50
Rebecca Hale
A general survey of the history, structure, and use of the English language. Topics investigated include: the history of the English language; elements of the structure of English; the distinctive characteristics of spoken and written English and the varied registers of English; the diversity of the English lexicon; regional and social dialects of English and their representation in literature; and the ideological dimensions of English language use, especially those relating to social and political issues and controversies. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement and ENG minor credit. (Same as LIN 209.)
 
 
ENG/LIN 210-001  History of the English Language
MWF 3-3:50
Andrew Byrd
A survey of the historical development of English from its Indo-European origins to the present. Includes an investigation of the principal changes which have affected English phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and vocabulary, and of the ways in which these changes are reflected in contemporary English usage; and an examination of the socio-historical factors that have shaped the evolution of the English language. (Same as LIN 210.)
 
 
ENG/LIN 210-002  History of the English Language
MWF 11-11:50
Rebecca Hale
A survey of the historical development of English from its Indo-European origins to the present. Includes an investigation of the principal changes which have affected English phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and vocabulary, and of the ways in which these changes are reflected in contemporary English usage; and an examination of the socio-historical factors that have shaped the evolution of the English language. (Same as LIN 210.)
 
 
ENG/LIN 221-001  Intro to Linguistics I: Theoretical Foundations & Analysis
TR 9:30-10:45
Instructor TBA
First of two courses offered in the introductory linguistics sequence, designed for majors and minors in Linguistics. Provides an intense and thorough introduction to the fundamental concepts of the field, including but not limited to: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. May be of use to students in other disciplines. Prerequisite for most 500 level LIN courses. Prereq: Declared major or minor in Linguistics, ENG/LIN 210, ENG/LIN 211, or approval of instructor. (Same as LIN 221.)
 
 
ENG 230-001  Intro to Literature
MWF 8-8:50
Heather McIntyre
English 230 is designed to provide students with an introduction to close reading and argumentative writing about literature.  Writing about literature is a process of revelation in which critics closely analyze texts to provide readers with new insights.   In this section, we will focus on texts that investigate place.  The Oxford English Dictionary defines “place” as “a particular part or region of space.”  The idea of place, however, involves much more than our physical location.  How do authors describe a place?  What affects might a specific place have on our personal thoughts, feelings, and actions?  What does it mean to find a place,  to know our place, to feel out of place, or to search for a new place?  In this class, we will examine the myriad ways in which authors deal with these questions and consider how literature influences and illuminates our own sense of place.  While we are reading and viewing literature dealing with these issues, we will also investigate how place informs and is in turn informed by literary criticism. Ultimately, we will learn ways to make our own argumentative revelations about both literature and literary criticism in the form of academic essays. 
 
 
ENG 230-002  Intro to Literature: Banned Books: From Huckleberry to Holden to Harry
MWF 9-9:50
Michael Carter
Why are school districts and some parents afraid of Harry Potter, Huckleberry Finn or others? Why are certain works and their characters’ words either avoided or expurgated to gain admittance into the corridors of high schools? This course will read these works and examine the historical and cultural reasons for the books’ being challenged in the past or today. Poems such as Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” and Ginsberg’s “Howl” have rallied opponents to suppress their inclusion in anthologies. We’ll try to redeem or reject these texts through close readings and research into the complaints about the books and into the themes of the texts. Coursework will include readings and two 8-10 pages essays as well as shorter writing assignments. 
 
 
ENG 230-003  Intro to Literature: Banned Books: From Huckleberry to Holden to Harry
MWF 10-10:50
Michael Carter
Why are school districts and some parents afraid of Harry Potter, Huckleberry Finn or others? Why are certain works and their characters’ words either avoided or expurgated to gain admittance into the corridors of high schools? This course will read these works and examine the historical and cultural reasons for the books’ being challenged in the past or today. Poems such as Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” and Ginsberg’s “Howl” have rallied opponents to suppress their inclusion in anthologies. We’ll try to redeem or reject these texts through close readings and research into the complaints about the books and into the themes of the texts. Coursework will include readings and two 8-10 pages essays as well as shorter writing assignments. 

 

ENG 230-004  Intro to Literature
MWF 11-11:50
Matthew Godbey

American writers love to destroy the world. Or, at the very least, they love to imagine worst-case scenarios in which the world as we know has ceased to exist. This is especially true for 20th-Century American writers who have used their fiction to explore the destruction, whether abrupt or gradual, of the United States and its aftermath in a variety of ways. Although such novels are often thought to be genre experiments coming from the world of science fiction and fantasy, the truth is that the attraction of imagining the end of America knows no literary boundaries. Writers as diverse as Octavia Butler, Cormac McCarthy, and Colson Whitehead have mined post-apocalyptic tropes and archetypes for their fiction, using the destruction of America and its aftermath as an opportunity to explore a range of issues and themes. Our course will provide an overview of recent Post-Apocalyptic fiction, drawing from novels that span the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and that represent a diverse group of authors from different backgrounds, races, and genders. In doing so, we will examine the attraction of these novels, and attempt to answer a number of key questions, such as:  Why do writers like to destroy the world and what can we learn from such stories? How does the method of destruction speak to contemporary fears and concerns and to what extent does the aftermath offer a way forward for readers?

 
ENG 230-005  Intro to Literature
MWF 12-12:50
Matthew Godbey

American writers love to destroy the world. Or, at the very least, they love to imagine worst-case scenarios in which the world as we know has ceased to exist. This is especially true for 20th-Century American writers who have used their fiction to explore the destruction, whether abrupt or gradual, of the United States and its aftermath in a variety of ways. Although such novels are often thought to be genre experiments coming from the world of science fiction and fantasy, the truth is that the attraction of imagining the end of America knows no literary boundaries. Writers as diverse as Octavia Butler, Cormac McCarthy, and Colson Whitehead have mined post-apocalyptic tropes and archetypes for their fiction, using the destruction of America and its aftermath as an opportunity to explore a range of issues and themes. Our course will provide an overview of recent Post-Apocalyptic fiction, drawing from novels that span the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and that represent a diverse group of authors from different backgrounds, races, and genders. In doing so, we will examine the attraction of these novels, and attempt to answer a number of key questions, such as:  Why do writers like to destroy the world and what can we learn from such stories? How does the method of destruction speak to contemporary fears and concerns and to what extent does the aftermath offer a way forward for readers?

 
ENG 230-006  Intro to Literature
TR 8-9:15
Leah Toth

Due to changing conceptions of music, modern mechanical inventions such as the automobile, and emerging sound reproduction technologies such as the phonograph, the twentieth century sounds like no other century before it. Today, this is nowhere more apparent than in the century s literature. In this section we will be exploring many of the relationships between literature, sound and identity. How did writers represent the changing soundscapes of their world? How did they attempt to incorporate the sounds and music around them into their written works? How did they come to associate their identities  and, often, those of their characters-- with the music they heard and the musical narratives passed down to them? We will explore these questions and others in this interdisciplinary introduction to literature that surveys novels, poetry, drama, music, film, short fiction, and nonfiction. This class will be an introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from different genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. There will be a strong emphasis on student writing, particularly devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence.

ENG 230-007  Intro to Literature
TR 9:30-10:15
Leah Toth

Due to changing conceptions of music, modern mechanical inventions such as the automobile, and emerging sound reproduction technologies such as the phonograph, the twentieth century sounds like no other century before it. Today, this is nowhere more apparent than in the century s literature. In this section we will be exploring many of the relationships between literature, sound and identity. How did writers represent the changing soundscapes of their world? How did they attempt to incorporate the sounds and music around them into their written works? How did they come to associate their identities  and, often, those of their characters-- with the music they heard and the musical narratives passed down to them? We will explore these questions and others in this interdisciplinary introduction to literature that surveys novels, poetry, drama, music, film, short fiction, and nonfiction. This class will be an introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from different genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. There will be a strong emphasis on student writing, particularly devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence.

 
 
ENG 230-008  Intro to Literature
TR 11-12:15
Alyssa MacLean
This course will introduce students to the study of literature and film by examining different forms of homecomings—from war, from school, from exile, and from colonial engagements in foreign locations. Over the course of the term we will examine some of the following questions: what is home? How is our subjectivity constructed by our location? How do experiences with “foreign” people and places prompt us (willingly or unwillingly) to re-imagine the self? How are these experiences away from home shaped by class, race, and gender? Is it ever really possible to return “home” from “away”? We will read short stories, autobiographical writing, and novels by authors such as Ernest Hemingway (In Our Time), Joseph Conrad (Heart of Darkness), and Lawrence Hill (Someone Knows My Name). We will also study films that explore the experiences of conquest, invasion, and exploration, including Avatar (dir. James Cameron) and The Piano(Jane Campion). Coursework will include three papers, participation assignments, and a final exam.
  
 
ENG 230-009  Intro to Literature
TR 12:30-1:45
Christina Williams
This course introduces students to close, critical reading and methods of argumentative writing about literature.  In this section, we will focus on narratives of guilt.  From crimes of passion and mistaken identities to family feuds and sibling rivalries, the texts we will read delve into a host of confessions and deceptions that are often spectacular and occasionally mundane, but at all times reveal the quirks and quandaries of an individual’s journey gone awry.  We will discuss how authors respond to social taboos and complicate cultural ideas of justice, morality, and belonging.  This course is writing intensive, which means that a significant portion of class time will be devoted to the writing process.  In addition to regular class participation, students will be evaluated on formal writing assignments, informal responses, quizzes, and presentations.
 
 
ENG 230-010  Intro to Literature
TR 2-3:15
Christina Williams
This course introduces students to close, critical reading and methods of argumentative writing about literature.  In this section, we will focus on narratives of guilt.  From crimes of passion and mistaken identities to family feuds and sibling rivalries, the texts we will read delve into a host of confessions and deceptions that are often spectacular and occasionally mundane, but at all times reveal the quirks and quandaries of an individual’s journey gone awry.  We will discuss how authors respond to social taboos and complicate cultural ideas of justice, morality, and belonging.  This course is writing intensive, which means that a significant portion of class time will be devoted to the writing process.  In addition to regular class participation, students will be evaluated on formal writing assignments, informal responses, quizzes, and presentations.
 
ENG 230-011  Intro to Literature
TR 3:30-4:45
Alyssa MacLean
This course will introduce students to the study of literature and film by examining different forms of homecomings—from war, from school, from exile, and from colonial engagements in foreign locations. Over the course of the term we will examine some of the following questions: what is home? How is our subjectivity constructed by our location? How do experiences with “foreign” people and places prompt us (willingly or unwillingly) to re-imagine the self? How are these experiences away from home shaped by class, race, and gender? Is it ever really possible to return “home” from “away”? We will read short stories, autobiographical writing, and novels by authors such as Ernest Hemingway (In Our Time), Joseph Conrad (Heart of Darkness), and Lawrence Hill (Someone Knows My Name). We will also study films that explore the experiences of conquest, invasion, and exploration, including Avatar (dir. James Cameron) and The Piano(Jane Campion). Coursework will include three papers, participation assignments, and a final exam.
 
 
ENG 230-401  Intro to Literature
TR 6-7:15
Andrea Holliger

This course will introduce students to the practice of literary scholarship, particularly the method of close, critical reading, which is its foundation.  To ground our discussion, we will investigate the broad themes of anxiety, individuality, narrative, and fear.  We will engage with questions like the following: How is the individual defined in relation to him/herself, the community, the world?  By what narratives does an individual make sense of the world around them?  What types of anxieties do these narratives create and/or assuage? This course is designed to introduce students to the challenging and ennobling practice of reading a text deeply, carefully, and critically, and to expressing this analysis in writing. By paying acute attention to words and representations, we will learn to think and write critically in ways that transcend the literary classroom and the academic environment. Students will be introduced to a wide variety of texts, from the traditionally canonical (Beowulf, Hamlet, The Turn of the Screw), to voices from the margins (Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl), and those that challenge canonical boundaries (The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao).  Evaluation will be based on a combination of in-class participation, exams, papers, regular in-class quizzes, and other brief writing assignments.

 
ENG 242-001  Survey of British Literature II
MWF 11-11:50
Jonathan Allison
A survey of British literature from the seventeenth century to the present, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the later English literary tradition. Authors covered may include the Augustan poetry of John Dryden and Alexander Pope; the early and later Romantic movements; novelists and poets of the Victorian period such as Charles Dickens, Alfred Tennyson, and Elizabeth B. Browning; the early twentieth-century Modernism of Virginia Woolf and T.S. Eliot; and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 332.
 
 
ENG 251-001  Survey of American Literature I
TR 12:30-1:45
Jeff Clymer
A survey of American literature from its colonial origins to the Civil War, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the American Colonies and antebellum United States. The course explores both the social conditions in which authors lived and wrote – such as conflicts over land with Native Americans, slavery, and the emergence of women’s rights – as well as the key developments in literary form during this period, such as the rise of the novel, the slave narrative, and the changing shape of poetry. Texts and authors covered may include Susanna Rowson, Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, Frederick Douglass’ Narrative, short stories by Edgar Allen Poe, the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement and Early Period requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 334.
 
 
ENG 260-001  Intro to Black Writers
TR 9:30-10:45
Rynetta Davis
An introduction to written and oral works by Black authors of Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. The course includes writers such as Chinua Achebe (Africa), Wilson Harris (Caribbean), and Toni Morrison (USA), as well as others from the diverse field of literature written by African-American authors and authors of color worldwide. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core Credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 264. Prereq: Graduation Writing Requirement Course – credit is awarded to students meeting the GWR prerequisite. (Same as AAS 264.)
 
 
ENG 266-001  Survey of African-American Literature II
TR 2-3:15
Vershawn Young
A survey of African-American literature from post-Reconstruction to the Black Arts Movement and beyond, with emphasis on selected genres, periods, and thematic characteristics of the later African-American cultural and literary experience to the present day. Topics include literature of the Reconstruction; poetry and dialect poetry, the “plantation tradition” and black musical traditions; Black Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance; the Black Power movement and Civil Rights. Authors may include Pauline Hopkins, Frances Harper, Sutton Griggs, Oscar Micheaux, W.E.B. DuBois, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
 
ENG 271-001  The Bible as Literature
MWF 11-11:50
Tikva Meroz-Aharoni

This course investigates selections from the Old and New Testaments in English as literary and cultural documents of great significance and literary achievement. Emphasis is on the careful analysis of literary forms and themes within a broadly historical and non-denominational context. This particular section of ENG 271 will look at contemporary Hebrew cultural texts that use the Old and New Testaments as inspiration. Many writers use images, metaphors, characters, expression, and incidents from ancient sources as literary devices. Not only will we analyze the modern, but we will also study the source material itself such as the Akedah and Biblical heroes (e.g. Abel , Saul, and Rachel). We will reference religious cultural productions such as plays, short stories, poems, works of art, and films that may be read in light of a literary understanding of the biblical texts they rely on. We will use works written by scholars such as Robert Alter and Meir Sternberg.  ENG Module Credit will be given for the Spring 2014 section of ENG 271 upon petition. Contact the ENG Director of Undergraduate Studies for details.

 
ENG 280-001  Intro to Film
TR 3:30-4:45
Aaron Cloyd
English 280 is an introduction to film analysis and to the study of film as visual and narrative art. This section is organized around formal elements of film such as mise-en-scène, cinematography, and sound. We will also consider genre in a brief unit on the western, and the course will conclude with a discussion on the film adaptation of Philip K Dick’s short story “The Minority Report.” Students will be responsible for applying knowledge gained from class discussions and textbook readings in analytical interpretations of the course films in the form of written essays. Particular attention will be paid to developing a thesis, crafting an argument, and using supporting evidence. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities.  Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.
   
   
ENG 280-002  Intro to Film
MWF 11-11:50
Ashleigh Hardin

Since its beginnings, film has been a self-conscious medium, and today we have no shortage of films about making films, films about movie stars, films about Hollywood, and even films about other kinds of media and performance.  In this class, we will view a range of films with particular emphasis on this theme: from the classic (1952’s Singin’ in the Rain) to the contemporary (2011’s The Artist), across genres (from the neo-noir Drive to the fantasy-romcom of The Purple Rose of Cairo), and with consideration given to the difficulties of representing reality in different media (documentary in Exit Through the Gift Shop, TV versus film in Network). Our class will situate the films we watch within their historical and cultural contexts and learn the basics of how films are made and distributed. You’ll be provided with the skills and vocabulary to begin critically interpreting film’s visual and narrative elements. Through analysis of both visual and narrative elements, you will learn to closely “read” and interpret meaning beneath a film’s “surface” and identify it as participating in (or swerving from) traditions and generic conventions. With these critical and evaluative tools, you’ll practice articulating interpretative arguments through written and multimedia assignments.

 
 
ENG 280-003 Intro to Film
TR 8-9:15
Ashley Bourgeois
This course introduces film as a cultural and narrative text. Students will learn to watch, speak about, and write about film by engaging such fundamental film concepts as genre, cinematography, sound, editing and mis-en-scene. In addition, this section will explore ways in which writers, directors and actors construct the social category of “other” through film. Questions we seek to answer include: What is “othering” and what social/historical/cultural purpose does it serve? In what ways does film help to define, regulate and perpetuate social norms through visions of the “other?” And finally, why is historical familiarity so crucial to understanding film? To answer these, we will move across a broad historical range of film texts, and multiple genres including western, blaxploitation, comedy, musical and dramatic film.
  
  
ENG 280-004  Intro to Film
TR 11-12:15
Aaron Cloyd
English 280 is an introduction to film analysis and to the study of film as visual and narrative art. This section is organized around formal elements of film such as mise-en-scène, cinematography, and sound. We will also consider genre in a brief unit on the western, and the course will conclude with a discussion on the film adaptation of Philip K Dick’s short story “The Minority Report.” Students will be responsible for applying knowledge gained from class discussions and textbook readings in analytical interpretations of the course films in the form of written essays. Particular attention will be paid to developing a thesis, crafting an argument, and using supporting evidence. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities.  Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.
 
 
ENG 280-005  Intro to Film
MWF 12-12:50
Jamie Fairfield
English 280 involves the analysis an exploration of film. The primary emphasis of the course will be learning how to conduct critical analysis of film. Students will watch and analyze films from a variety of genres, time periods, and nationalities. Additionally, students will learn many of the key terms involved in making film including different shots, angles, and cuts. The course will also explore the key characteristics of different film genres. Films watched will include, among others, Rear Window, It Happened One Night, and Rosemary’s Baby. Course requirements will include two essays, a final exam, and regular participation. 
 
 
ENG 280-006  Intro to Film
MWF 1-1:50
Jamie Fairfield
English 280 involves the analysis an exploration of film. The primary emphasis of the course will be learning how to conduct critical analysis of film. Students will watch and analyze films from a variety of genres, time periods, and nationalities. Additionally, students will learn many of the key terms involved in making film including different shots, angles, and cuts. The course will also explore the key characteristics of different film genres. Films watched will include, among others, Rear Window, It Happened One Night, and Rosemary’s Baby. Course requirements will include two essays, a final exam, and regular participation. 
 
 
ENG 280-401  Intro to Film
MW 6-7:15
Alan Nadel

This course will look at the basic elements of the craft of filmmaking, including, narrative structure, genre, cinematic conventions, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, film sound, film style, and film history. We will also examine the way that films reflect the historically specific conditions of their production. There will be two 3-page papers, two exams, and a number of short quizzes based on chapters of the text book and the content of films viewed outside of class.

 
ENG 280-402  Intro to Film
TR 6-7:15
Amanda Konkle
English 280 is an introduction to the study of films as narrative and visual art and as cultural documents. We will begin by discussing the concepts that shape film study in order to give you the vocabulary and skills necessary to interpret, analyze, and write about film. As we learn about mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, genre, and other film fundamentals, you will be expected to apply this knowledge to analytical interpretations of the course films. Our section in particular will consider “Growing Up Cinematic.” In addition to discussing various perspectives for interpreting fiction films, we will also address units on the child, the teen, community belonging, success and failure, romance and marriage, and loss. You will be responsible for viewing films outside of class. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities.  Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.
 
 
ENG/JPN 283-001  Japanese Film
MWF 10-10:50
Masamichi Inoue
Study of Japanese films as an expression of Japanese culture. Viewing of films outside of class required. (Same as ENG 283.)
 
 
ENG 290-001  Intro to Women's Literature
TR 12:30-1:45
Michelle Talbott

This course will focus on women’s literature to explore the domestic horror story. We will concentrate on the gender dynamics at work in our key themes of subjugation and imprisonment within the home, physical and emotional abuse, and the rebellion sparked by oppression. Beginning our exploration in the mid-nineteenth century and winding up in the twenty-first, we will read texts by both British and American women writers to think about the ways that class, race, and sexuality constrain and liberate women in the effort to escape or claim a domestic space for themselves. Our readings will include works by Charlotte Bronte, Jean Rhys, Alice Walker, Marilynne Robinson, Toni Morrison, and others. Evaluation will be based on participation, responses, and essays.

 
ENG/WRD 301-001  Style for Writers
TR 9:30-10:45
William Endres
This course is designed for students who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others.  While the course includes some account of historical changes in prose style and requires some stylistic analysis of a variety of texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students' own writing.  Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination, subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace. 
 
 
ENG/WRD 301-002  Style for Writers
TR 2-3:15
William Endres
This course is designed for students who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others.  While the course includes some account of historical changes in prose style and requires some stylistic analysis of a variety of texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students' own writing.  Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination, subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace. 
 
  
ENG 330-001  Text and Context: The Gothic Novel
MW 3-4:15
Lisa Zunshine
Crumbling mansions, dark subterranean passages, grasping middle-aged villains in pursuit of virtuous orphans, supernatural forces, unspeakable secrets, startling revelations, and occasional parodies of it all—our course will follow the history of the Gothic novel from Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto to Austen’s Northanger Abbey and du Maurier’s (and Hitchcock’s) Rebecca. Short papers, quizzes, two longer papers.
  
 
ENG 330-002  Text and Context: Hamlet and Revenge
TR 9:30-10:45
Walter Foreman
This section of the English Major core course will focus on the close reading and analysis of Shakespeare's Hamlet in the contexts of (a) London theater conditions around 1600, (b) other "revenge" plays produced around the same time (such as Kyd's Spanish Tragedy and Middleton's Revenger's Tragedy, as well as other plays by Shakespeare), (c) some other texts from the period (including writings from Thomas Nashe and Francis Bacon), and (d) the political, social, and economic situation in England and Ireland in which Hamlet appeared.  In addition to reading Hamlet and other revenge plays, we will consider several film versions of Hamlet, including those directed by Laurence Olivier, Grigori Kozintsev, and Kenneth Branagh, as well as Branagh's A Midwinter's Tale.  As noted in the general catalog description, students will develop analytical and interpretive skills that deepen their historical and conceptual understanding of literature, as well as their skills of critical reading, writing, and presentation.
  
 
ENG 330-003  Text and Context: King Lear
TR 2-3:15
Joyce MacDonald

Shakespeare’s King Lear, the monumental tragedy of an aging father and his three daughters, has never left the stage since its first performances in 1606. In this section of English 330, we will study the play, its complex textual history, and the hold it has exercised over actors, directors, and audiences all over the world in the centuries since its premiere. Students will view several different filmed versions of the play all or in part: Gerolamo Io Savio’s 1910 silent version; the Lears of Grigori Kozintzev and Peter Brook, both released in 1971; and Trevor Nunn’s 2008 film with Ian McKellen. The course will also be concerned with adaptations of and responses to Shakespeare’s play, beginning with Nahum Tate’s 1681 Lear (which gives it a happy ending), and including Akira Kurosawa’s powerful Ran and Jane Smiley’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel A Thousand Acres. King Lear and its rich afterlife offers a treasure trove of material for studying how stories transmit themselves across time and culture and how the meanings they communicate change as they are received by new generations. What are we doing when we read and reproduce a powerful literary text? What has Lear told us?

 
ENG 338-001  Topics in Lit: 19th Century Historical Fiction
TR 11-12:15
Michelle Sizemore

“Time flies over us, but leaves its shadow behind.” This reflection, taken from Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Marble Faun, captures a basic conviction of numerous nineteenth-century American fiction writers who chased the long “shadow” of the past. In this class we will be concerned with historical thinking from the vantage point of the shadows—studies of the aberrant and indeterminate, stories told from behind the scenes or at the margins.  Inevitably such priorities draw us to historical fiction (mostly) written in the fantastical, supernatural, or farcical modes. Our investigations will be challenging and wide-ranging.  We will examine the mechanics of memory, time and narrative, and correspondences between history and historical fiction. We will unravel backward-looking feelings such as nostalgia, melancholy, and regret. Finally, we will trace the contemporary fascination with nineteenth-century American history, evidenced, for example, in the recent explosion of interest in the life of Abraham Lincoln (from Lincoln to Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter), Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained, Fox’s re-working of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, and Comedy Central’s Drunk History series. Possible authors include: Washington Irving, Leonora Sansay, Catharine Sedgwick, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Elizabeth Keckley, Mark Twain, Henry James, Pauline Hopkins, and Charles Chesnutt. Weekly responses, presentation, two papers, final exam.

ENG 339-001  Author Studies: Mark Twain
MWF 12-12:50
Michael Carter
We know the kindly, mustachioed, white-haired-gentleman author of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and of “Leaping Frog …” fame, and the humorist who traveled the globe cheering thousands with his irreverent views on governments and the late 19th century world. What we may be less familiar with is the cynical, “blasphemous” writer that even his family hid from the public after his death. This dark Twain tackled religion’s hypocrisy and mankind’s ignorance as well as other issues of his day. We’ll begin with Adam and take our tour of Mark Twain’s Bible through to the early 20th century and “The Mysterious Stranger” that Samuel Clemens was.  Work load will be daily readings, two short essays, one larger essay, tests and quizzes, and other contextual assignments.
 
 
ENG 339-002  Author Studies: Thoreau
TR 9:30-10:45
Randall Roorda
In this class we’ll focus on Henry David Thoreau, celebrated as the author of Walden and “Civil Disobedience.” Thoreau warrants attention for many reasons:
·         Unusual among literary artists, his work invites not just aesthetic regard but active participation, with Walden having motivated generations of walkers and cabin-dwellers.
·         By example and rhetorical prowess, he’s a wellspring for environmental feeling, philosophy, and allegiance.
·         As an amateur naturalist before professional science existed, he both conducted and reflected on scientific investigation in what we’ve come to call ecology.
·         As an apostle of resistance to state-sponsored racism and oppression, his influence is global and enduring.
·         He’s one of America’s most distinctive prose stylists, limpid and riddling by turns, famously pithy as an aphorist yet capable of passages that are intricate and monumental.
·         He’s an extreme instance of someone who lived to write, his published journal running to thirteen volumes;
·         He was active in a period central to the development of American culture and identity, and he figures in a lineage—Pragmatism—integral to our thought and letters.
·         He’s an odd, prickly, noble, blinkered, stiff-necked yet supple, spiritual yet down-to-earth dude in his own right, who notwithstanding his taste for solitude is well worth living with for a while.
We’ll read two full books by Thoreau (Walden and The Maine Woods), excerpts from two other books, a number of essays (including “Civil Disobedience” and “Walking”), and significant chunks of his journal. We’ll also read some writing on his life, work, and social context, and we’ll explore some texts by his successors. Assignments include a flurry of written responses, a couple short essays, and a final project of an open-ended nature, inviting students to enact their own form of Thoreauvian succession.
 
 
ENG 342-001  Shakespeare
TR 11-12:15
Walter Foreman

An introductory survey of Shakespeare's plays, covering all forms (comedies, histories, and tragedies) and periods (early, middle, and late).  We will examine Shakespearean theater and performance (physical and philosophical architecture, performance as interpretation, visualization of written texts, audience as part of action, play as play); Shakespearean language and its relation to "truth" (arguments, meanings, metaphors, puns, verse, poetry: in short, wordplay); the way the structure of the plays produces meaning (function and order of scenes); the way words make characters, and the way characters interact, verbally and visually; and the social implications of the plays (for both the 16/17th and the 20th centuries) and the ways audiences (including ourselves) interpret the plays.  Likely to be included are A Midsummer Night's DreamThe Merchant of VeniceTwelfth NightRichard IIHenry IV Part 1OthelloKing LearAntony and Cleopatra, and The Winter's Tale.

 
 
ENG 343-001  Renaissance Drama & Society
TR 12:30-1:45
Joyce MacDonald
This course studies Elizabethan and Jacobean drama by Shakespeare’s predecessors and contemporaries. Although most people identify Shakespeare as the representative Renaissance playwright, he was only one member of a distinguished generation. Students will encounter a variety of popular dramatic genres in which Shakespeare either did not work or that he heavily adapted to his own ends: Turk plays, city comedy, unperformed “closet drama,” revenge tragedy, pastoral. Readings may include playwrights such as Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, Elizabeth Cary, Lady Mary Wroth, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, and others; and topics such as tragedy and comedy, sex and romance, urban life and the value of money, and racial and religious difference. Fulfills the ENG Early Period requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Prereq: Completion of UK Core Composition and Communication I-II requirement or equivalent.
 
 
ENG 352-001  American Lit & Cultures to 1900
MWF 9-9:50
Matthew Godbey
This course focuses on selected literary movements and their relationships to American culture up through 1900. Authors studied may include Susanna Rowson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Harriet Jacobs, and Henry James. Topics may include American imperialism, slavery and abolition, the rise of the historical novel, Sentimentalism, Romanticism, and the emergence of psychological realism. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Prereq: Completion of UK Core Composition and Communication I-II requirement or equivalent.
 
 
ENG 369-001  African-American Women's Writing
TR 11-12:15
Rynetta Davis
This course analyzes the literary and visual representation of black women from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. It explores how selected writers, working across different genres, render black female characters in ways that perpetuate, contest, or subvert stereotypical images of black women. Texts and authors may include Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Frances Harper’s Trial and Triumph, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks’ Maud Martha (1953), Toni Cade Bambara’s Gorilla, My Love (1972), Toni Morrison’s Sula (1973), and contemporary authors such as Ann Allen Shockley, Gayl Jones, Nikky Finney, and others. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Prereq: Completion of UK Core Composition and Communication I-II requirement or equivalent.
 
 
ENG 370-001  Literature Across Borders
TR 9:30-10:45
Alyssa MacLean
This section of ENG 370 will consider how the US border is represented in literature and film from the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Each unit of the course will examine the interactions of different populations with the terrestrial borders of the US in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Over the course of the semester we will compare the experiences of these groups across the boundaries of language, ethnicity, race, and time. What is a border? How does the US border consolidate or organize ideas of race, language, class, and gender? How do North American authors and filmmakers represent concerns about imperialism, citizenship, and ownership differently? Finally, how are the experiences and literatures of migratory or minority populations affected by the presence of US borders? Over the course of the term we will study works by Cormac McCarthy, Americo Paredes, Laura Esquivel, Tom King, and Courtney Hunt. All works will be read and discussed in English.
 
 
ENG 391-001  Literary Theory
MWF 11-11:50
Matthew Giancarlo
Since the 1940’s “literary theory” has emerged as a vibrant and vital aspect of literary studies. The term covers a wide range of formal, historical, and critical approaches to literature and culture that have changed the ways we read. This course investigates selected trends and schools of modern literary theory in diverse texts and contexts. These can include formalism, Practical Criticism, and the New Criticism; French Structuralism and the various modes of post-structuralism (Semiotics, Deconstruction, Reader-response, Speechact theory); historicism and the New Historicism; as well as broader modes of cultural critique such as Feminism, Marxism, Critical Theory and the Frankfurt School, Post-colonialism, Critical Race Theory, and more. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Prereq: Completion of UK Core Composition and Communication I-II requirement or equivalent.
 
 
ENG/WRD 401-001  Special Topics in Writing: TV & Its Discontents
MWF 10-10:50
Thomas Marksbury
An examination of the so-called “Third Golden Age of Television”, roughly from the mid-1990s to the present.  The emphasis is on programming from the networks under pressure as they gave way to primarily HBO and the great cable series which followed, shows which proved to be the equivalent of 19th century social realism for the 21st century.  Keeping Dickens and Tolstoy in mind as literary progenitors, has television eclipsed film as the predominate narrative art form of the new millennium?  We will look into several thematic and genre oriented programming. The course is divided into four sections:  The Killer Inside Me examines two of the greatest contemporary crime series, The Sopranos and Breaking Bad, in terms of their unprecedented psychological probing of their (anti-) heroes, and approaches the role of Claire Danes in the meta-espionage thriller Homeland in similar terms.  The second unit, Teenage Wasteland, traces the treatment of adolescent angst from the genre and gender blending Buffy the Vampire Killer through more “realistic” but subtly stylized melodrama as My So-Called Life and Freaks and Geeks.  The third section, Situational Ethics, looks at some of the best situation comedies of the last twenty years—Seinfeld, the sketchier—in every sense of the word—Chappell, a more extreme cynicism (if that’s possible) in Curb Your Enthusiasm  and the animated Boondocks.  The fourth  section ,American Dreams, interrogates two seminal mini-series, The Corner and Angels in America, and the ongoing  Mad MenTexts:  Difficult Men:  Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution From the Sopranos and the Wire to Mad Men and Breaking Bad (Brett Martin, 2013) The Revolution Was Televised: the Cops, Crooks, Slingers and Slayers Who Changed TV Drama Forever (Alan Seppinwall, 2013) Two exams, three fairly short papers.
 
 
ENG/WRD 401-003  Special Topics in Writing: Travel
TR 2-3:15
Randall Roorda
In this course we’ll read travel writing (a broad genre, from lofty literature to lowdown guidebook fodder), writing on travel (as historical phenomenon and object of desire), and writing about writing as travel (the mind’s motion through present, remembered, and projected landscapes). We’ll travel and write on travel ourselves, in notebooks, travelogues, and essays. The course is participatory and workshop-based, its territory demarcated but destinations uncertain and itinerary open. Course grading will split about equally between daily work—reading response, on-site notebook writing, drafting essays and responding to drafts of others—and a portfolio of finished writing, some fifteen-plus pages. Since a course on travel had best involve actual travel, I’ll organize daytrips (two of them, probably, on Fridays or Saturdays) to regional tourist venues, one or the other of which will be mandatory. Yet since travel is not just movement but also a stance, an attitude toward experience (such that Thoreau could quip he’d “travelled a good deal in Concord,” his own home town), what we learn and do should affect our view of local circumstances as well.
 
 
ENG/WRD 405-001  Editing English Prose
MWF 11-11:50
Brandy Scalise
This course is designed for students interested in the basics of editing and publishing and offers instruction and extensive practice in editing and revising both the student’s own writing and the prose works of others. In addition to learning techniques of revision, verification of sources, and preparation of manuscripts, students will be expected to learn about the editing profession generally and to follow trends in editing and publishing. Not for students with writing deficiencies. Prereq: WRD 301, or WRD 306, or consent of instructor. (Same as WRD 405.)

  
ENG 407-001  Intermediate Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Poetry
W 5-7:30
Julia Johnson

Continued studies in the writer’s craft, focusing on student work but with increased emphasis on outside reading. Areas of workshop practice include Poetry, Fiction, and Creative Non-Fiction. Prerequisite ENG 207 or consent of instructor. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Can count only once for ENG Major 400-level course requirement.
 
  
ENG 407-002  Intermediate Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Non-Fiction
TR 11-12:15
Erik Reece
Continued studies in the writer’s craft, focusing on student work but with increased emphasis on outside reading. Areas of workshop practice include Poetry, Fiction, and Creative Non-Fiction. Prereq: ENG 207 or consent of instructor. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Can count only once for ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Required for ENG Imaginative Writing Option.
 
 
ENG 440G-001  Studies in Brit Lit: Modern Scottish and Irish Writing
MWF 9-9:50
Jonathan Allison

A course on the literature and culture of modern Ireland and Scotland.  Primary focus will be on literature, with consideration of historical and political backgrounds. Themes may include Anglo-Scottish, Anglo-Irish and Scottish-Irish cultural relations; Scotland and America; Ireland and America; the cult of Robert Burns; the cult of the Highlands; Celticism and the Celtic Revival, Gender, Sexuality and Modernism. Reading may include the poetry of Robert Burns, W.B. Yeats, Lady Wilde, Patrick Kavanagh and others – and fiction by Robert Louis Stevenson, John Buchan, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, James Stephens, Frank O’Connor, Edna O’Brien and others.

 
ENG 450G-001  Studies in Am. Lit/ Am. Studies 401: American Documentary Films
MW 4-5:15
Alan Nadel
This course will look at over twenty-five  films, most of them made since 1990, dealing with aspects of American history and culture. We will discuss these films as interpretations of events and attend closely to the kinds of decisions the filmmakers make and the ways they employ the materials available to them and the conventions and rhetoric of cinematic representation to create their perspective on the topic they are examining. Some of the films will include: American Movie, Freedom on My Mind, A Time for Burning, Gimme Shelter, Searching for Sugar Man, Anvil: The Story of Anvil, The Fog of War, Taxi to the Dark Side, Hearts and Minds, Jesus Camp, Virgin Tales, Religulous, Capturing the Freidmans, Rosie the Riveter, Harlan County U.S.A., Sicko, The One Percent, Enron:  The Smartest Guys in the Room.  The course will require several very short research assignments and class participation. The course is cross-listed with English and American Studies.
 
 
ENG 495-001  Major Honors Seminar: American Psychos
TR 2-3:15
Michael Trask

In spite (or because) of the truism that Americans like to see themselves as the good guys, our national literature is filled with stories that feature villains in the role of heroes.  This class will survey a range of such texts (mostly but not limited to novels) from the mid-20th century to the present.  We shall pay special attention to the paradoxical incentives that impel novelists to devote loving attention to unlovable characters, to spin fictive social worlds out of the most antisocial behavior.  How does a writer produce such a fiction without lapsing into the position of moralist, on the one hand, or mere celebrant of the outsider, on the other? What does it say about such fiction’s readers when they are drawn (or even eager) to identify with sociopathic characters? Though we shall draw on the precedents of literary tradition—the rogue, the antihero, the outlaw—our chief focus will be on the distinctly American version of the bad guy as protagonist.  Our focus will thus be on the varieties of un-American activities to which evil intent or identity has been yoked: political subversion, sexual deviance, unbridled materialism.  Likely texts will include Jim Thompson’s The Killer Inside Me; Mary McCarthy’s The Groves of Academe; William Burroughs’s Junkie; Vladimir Nabokov’s Pale Fire; Patricia Highsmith’s The Talented Mr. Ripley; Leonard Kastle’s The Honeymoon Killers; John Waters’s Pink Flamingos; Bret Easton Ellis’s American Psycho; the HBO series The Sopranos; Gary Indiana’s Three Month Fever; Janet Malcolm’s The Journalist and the Murderer; and Mat Johnson’s Hunting in Harlem.

 
ENG 507-001  Advanced Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction
W 5-7:30
Gurney Norman
English 507-001 Fiction is an advanced course for experienced writers in which students practice short story, novel and experimental fiction writing.  The class meetings feature writing exercises in which students display their understanding of various elements of traditional story-writing such as plot development, dialogue, description, character development and point of view.  Students are asked to produce during the semester three original, polished short stories or chapters that represent the student’s best effort.  Students are invited to read their work aloud in class for discussion but this is not a requirement. The reading component includes selected stories by American, English, and Russian authors.
 
 
ENG/EDC 509-401
TR 6-8:30
Brandon Abdon
A course covering the basic studies helpful to teachers of English composition at the secondary level. Focuses on the teaching of grammar, punctuation, usage, etc., and on theme planning, correction, and revision. Students are required to do quite a bit of writing. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. (Same as EDC 509.)
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