Why English is a Great Major For Pre-Law Students

English offers the benefits of advanced reading comprehension and persuasive writing, two crucial skills for attending law school and taking the LSAT. As an English major, you study dense and complex literature, process complicated information quickly, make connections, and create -- a unique skill set required by law students.

The American Bar Association lists seven “Core Skill and Values” that students should acquire in preparation for the law. All of these skills and attributes are taught in the English Major:

 

1. Analytic/Problem Solving Skills
2. Critical Reading
3. Writing Skills
4. Oral Communication/Listening Abilities
5. General Research Skills
6. Task Organization/Management Skills
7. Public Service and Promotion of Justice

 

For more, see: English Degree + Law School = Winning Combination The Best Majors for Law School

Ella Dunbar, UK English Major (JD 2015): “The close reading skills I developed as an English major helped both with questions on the LSAT and in identifying fact patterns in law school.”

Miata Eggerly, UK English Major (JD 2018): “You’re building writing and analytical skills when you work with a piece of literature. Those skills are transferred when you’re dealing with the logic and reasoning part of the law school admission test and you’re asked to find the strength in the argument. Remembering and sharing pertinent information, analytics, figuring out what’s being asked in a logic game – I honed those skills as an English major.”

Michele Mirman, founder and senior partner at Mirman, Markovits and Landau, PC: “In truth, any undergraduate degree can help to prepare a student who aspires to be an attorney. I found that my English degree has been exceptionally helpful throughout my legal career. Why? The law is an art. In order to master that art, it helps to have a firm grasp on the English language and an expansive vocabulary. It’s important to know how to bend and manipulate language to my benefit. As an English major, I dedicated a lot of time to reading, analyzing, and writing. I learned to step back, assess a story I was told, and think outside the box. In reality, I was honing skills that are critical for any practicing attorney.”

 

 

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