Fall Courses

FALL 2014
 
ENG 107 001  Introduction to Imaginative Writing
MWF 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm
Cheryl E Cardiff
This is an introductory course in creative writing for the novice and curious interested in exploring how poetry and prose can express their ideas. In this class, we will practice a range of written creative expression. Lecture sessions will be devoted partly to “talking craft,” that is, to familiarizing ourselves with various literary and craft elements pertinent to the creative writing genres being practiced and to analyzing how writers employ these elements to put forth a work that captures readers’ imaginations. The other half of our sessions will be devoted to “crafting,” that is, the workshop process that inducts you and fellow beginning writers to experiment with the different creative writing forms studied.

ENG107 satisfies the objectives and outcomes delineated by the Intellectual Inquiry into Arts and Creativity of the UKCore Curriculum, the primary emphasis of which is to define and distinguish different approaches to creativity, demonstrate the ability to critically analyze work produced by other students, and evaluate results of their own creative endeavors.

 
ENG 107 002   Introduction to Imaginative Writing
TR 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Erik A Reece
ENG 107 introduces students to the different genres of literature: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama and film. Students will read widely in these forms then make their own contributions to each. Expert guest lecturers will visit the class to speak about their own work. 
ENG 171 001  Global Literature in English
TR 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Peter Kalliney

"National literature is now a rather unmeaning term; the epoch of world literature is at hand, and everyone must strive to hasten its approach." So said Goethe back in 1827, anticipating a time when literature--and the English language--would refuse to observe national boundaries. How did English become the dominant language of global literature? How did the adoption of English change the culture of the places to which it spread?  This class satisfies the Global Dynamics component of the UK Core.

ENG 207 001  Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction
MWF 9:00-9:50
Cheryl Cardiff

DEAR AUTHOR: THIS COURSE INTRODUCES YOU to the forms and practices of creative writing. Focusing on each individual, our workshop will develop the skill in writing stories and/or personal narratives. To help foster your work, weekly exercises will help you develop an understanding of the elements of the craft such as character development, narrative structure, dialogic engagement, and scene development. You also will be expected to read peer work with care and to discuss this writing with constructive, informed, and articulate criticism to specific elements of the text that go beyond simple like and dislike. The study of works by writers such as Annie Proulx, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Wallace Stegner in the context of craft—as opposed to literary interpretation or historical analysis—is a critical part of your artistic discipline and creative output. The main feature of the course is (of course) THE WORKSHOP itself, and you will have the opportunity to provide stories for peer evaluation three times over thecourse of the semester. Vital to writing is re-writing, of returning to your work and sculpting it into the shape you wish it to take. For your efforts, you will have the opportunity to further develop one workshopped piece for a second round of peer and instructor critique. As you practice becoming an effective and careful reader of both peer and established writing, you do become an effective and careful reader of your own. Writing, reading, and evaluating peer work all further your own creative practice. By the end of the term, you will feature your two workshopped stories and your choice of three shorter “best effort” writing exercises in a portfolio that you can be proud of, and one day, pass on to future progeny and fans.

 
ENG 207 002  Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction
TR 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Manuel Gonzales
 
ENG 207 003  Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction
TR 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm
Manuel Gonzales
 
ENG 207 004  Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction
TR 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
Hannah Pittard 
 
ENG 207 005  Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Poetry
W 5:00-7:30PM
Julia Johnson
This class is devoted to creative writing by you and by others. It is a workshop-based class. You will be given writing assignments and readings designed to unleash your creativity and spark your powers of observation, imagination, and memory.  We will discuss the art and craft of writing poetry, and we will workshop one another's work with enthusiasm and care. We will read an extensive amount of work by modern and contemporary poets. Coursework will include poetry writing exercises, six revised poems, active participation, comments on the work of your peers, responses to readings, and a final portfolio of revised work.
 
ENG 207 007  Beginning Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction
T 5:00-7:30PM
Hannah Pittard
 
Eng 209 001 The Structure and Use of English
MWF 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm
Benjamin Graham Jones
 
ENG/LIN 210 001  History of English Language
MWF 10:00 am - 10:50 am
Andrew M Byrd
ENG/LIN 210 002  History of English Language
MWF 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm

Sedigheh Moradi 

ENG/LIN 221 001  Intro to Linguistics I
MWF 11:00-11:50
Andrew Byrd

This course is designed to give you a broad introduction to the field of Linguistics, the scientific study of human language.  This course is divided into two parts. The first will provide students with a basic foundation in the study of grammar, introducing the five core components of human grammar: syntax, morphology, phonetics, phonology and semantics. We will then build upon this knowledge in the second section, surveying a number of subfields of linguistics, including historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, language acquisition, and language and the brain. Intended for non-linguistics majors.

ENG 230 001  Intro to Literature
MWF 8:00-8:50

Travis Martin
ENG 230 is an introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence.
 
This course will explore American identities in twentieth-century American poetry, prose, and drama. We will look at groundbreaking texts in conjunction with films and other contemporary media. For example, in discussion board responses students will be asked to find representations of American men (i.e. The Expendables or Fight Club) or women (i.e. Girl, Interrupted or The Hours) and compare them to the primary texts from the class. Our overarching question to answer: What does it mean to be an American? How is “Americanness” performed differently for men, women, and different racial and socioeconomic groups? How can American identities be viewed as works-in-progress and in what direction are they headed? We will examine themes like American resiliency and specific versions of African-American(ness) in W. E. B. Dubois’s The Souls of Black Folk as well as a masculine search for “self” in Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises. Poetry by Edna St. Vincent Millay and others will help us explore American Feminisms, while David Henry Hwang and Edward Albee will help us understand America in the wake of colonialism—the local and global interrelations between populations impacted by imperial politics—and constructions of heteronormativity. Zora Neal Hurston will be our starting point for understanding the voice of the African American Women while Kate Chopin will be our starting point for examining the growth of women’s rights throughout the twentieth century. At the end of the semester, students will feel confident writing and making arguments about literary texts from twentieth century America.
 
Required Texts
  • Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises
  • Edward Albee, The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?
  • W. E. B. Dubois, The Souls of Black Folk
  • Edna St. Vincent Millay, The Collected Poems
  • Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God
  • David Henry Huang, M. Butterfly
  • Kate Chopin, The Awakening
  • William Harmon Ed., A Handbook to Literature (11th Edition)
ENG 230 002  Intro to Literature
MWF 9:00-9:50
Alyssa E. MacLean 
ENG 230 is an introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence.

 

This section of ENG 230 will introduce students to the study of literature and film by examining different forms of homecomings—from war, from school, from exile, and from colonial engagements in foreign locations. Over the course of the term we will examine some of the following questions: what is home? How is our subjectivity constructed by our location? How do experiences with “foreign” people and places prompt us (willingly or unwillingly) to re-imagine the self? How are these experiences away from home shaped by class, race, and gender? Is it ever really possible to return “home” from “away”? We will read short stories, autobiographical writing, and novels by authors such as Ernest Hemingway (In Our Time), Mark Twain (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn), and Lawrence Hill (Someone Knows My Name). We will also study films that explore the experiences of conquest, invasion, and exploration, including Avatar (dir. James Cameron) and The Piano [dir. Jane Campion]. Coursework will include three papers, participation assignments, and a final exam.

ENG 230 003  Intro to Literature
MWF 10:00-10:50

ENG 230 004  Intro to Literature
MWF 11:00-11:50

ENG 230 005  Intro to Literature: 
MWF 11:00-11:50

ENG 230 006  Intro to Literature: 
MWF 12:00-12:50

ENG 230 007  Intro to Literature
MWF 1:00-1:50

ENG 230 008  Intro to Literature: Literature and Justice
TR 8:00 am - 9:15 am
Michael Carter

English 230: Banned Books , Fall 2014
Why are school districts and some parents afraid of Harry Potter, Huckleberry Finn or others? Why are certain works and their characters’ words either avoided or expurgated to gain admittance into the corridors of high schools and libraries? This course will read these works and examine the historical and cultural reasons for the books’ being challenged in the past or today. Poems such as Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” and Ginsberg’s “Howl” have rallied opponents to suppress their inclusion in anthologies. We’ll try to redeem or reject these and other texts through close readings and research into the complaints about the books and into the themes of the texts. Coursework will include readings and two 5-7, one collaborative project, as well as shorter writing assignments.
 
ENG 230 009  Intro to Literature
TR 9:30-10:45
Jessica Holland
In this section of ENG 230, we will be focusing on food and feasting in literature and film. Not only is food a basic survival necessity, but it is also a theme in many different genres of literature. Through the course we will explore the following questions: why is food so important to us? How is food used in ways other than eating/survival? What “counts” as food? Why do so many authors focus on food in their writing? Is it culturally significant? We will read a variety of different texts to explore these questions. Readings might include The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’sThe Jungle by Upton Sinclair, Earnest Hemingway’s A Moveable FeastSir Gawain and the Green Knight, and other novels, poems, and plays.
This course is writing intensive. Students will write regular reading log entries and two (2) five to six (5-6) page papers in addition to sitting for a midterm exam. We will work closely together in developing a thesis and an argument; you will be given plenty of time to revise rough drafts before the final draft is due. 
ENG 230 010  Intro to Literature
TR 11:00-12:15
Michael Carter
English 230: Banned Books , Fall 2014
Why are school districts and some parents afraid of Harry Potter, Huckleberry Finn or others? Why are certain works and their characters’ words either avoided or expurgated to gain admittance into the corridors of high schools and libraries? This course will read these works and examine the historical and cultural reasons for the books’ being challenged in the past or today. Poems such as Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” and Ginsberg’s “Howl” have rallied opponents to suppress their inclusion in anthologies. We’ll try to redeem or reject these and other texts through close readings and research into the complaints about the books and into the themes of the texts. Coursework will include readings and two 5-7, one collaborative project, as well as shorter writing assignments.
 
ENG 230 011  Intro to Literature
TR 11:00-12:15
Jessica Holland
In this section of ENG 230, we will be focusing on food and feasting in literature and film. Not only is food a basic survival necessity, but it is also a theme in many different genres of literature. Through the course we will explore the following questions: why is food so important to us? How is food used in ways other than eating/survival? What “counts” as food? Why do so many authors focus on food in their writing? Is it culturally significant? We will read a variety of different texts to explore these questions. Readings might include The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’sThe Jungle by Upton Sinclair, Earnest Hemingway’s A Moveable FeastSir Gawain and the Green Knight, and other novels, poems, and plays.
This course is writing intensive. Students will write regular reading log entries and two (2) five to six (5-6) page papers in addition to sitting for a midterm exam. We will work closely together in developing a thesis and an argument; you will be given plenty of time to revise rough drafts before the final draft is due. 
ENG 230 012  Intro to Literature
TR 12:30-1:45
Aaron Cloyd
English 230 is an introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence.
This section will explore texts that relate to the idea of endings. 2012 was not the first time the end of the world was contemplated. Expected computer failures, nuclear warfare, and religious prophesy have repeatedly prompted various “last days” scenarios, and this semester we will explore this cultural fascination as it is expressed in contemporary American literature. This course will consider novels, graphic narratives, poetry, and short fiction, thereby introducing you to a wide field of literary genres. As we read and view these texts, we will ask what makes this theme so appealing to write and read about, how various authors interpret and respond to expressions of endings, and how these narratives inform our interactions within our cultures.  
ENG 230 013  Intro to Literature
TR 2:00 - 3:15
Aaron Cloyd
English 230 is an introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence.
This section will explore texts that relate to the idea of endings. 2012 was not the first time the end of the world was contemplated. Expected computer failures, nuclear warfare, and religious prophesy have repeatedly prompted various “last days” scenarios, and this semester we will explore this cultural fascination as it is expressed in contemporary American literature. This course will consider novels, graphic narratives, poetry, and short fiction, thereby introducing you to a wide field of literary genres. As we read and view these texts, we will ask what makes this theme so appealing to write and read about, how various authors interpret and respond to expressions of endings, and how these narratives inform our interactions within our cultures.  
ENG 230 014  Intro to Literature
TR 3:30-4:45
 
ENG 241 001  Survey of British Lit I
MWF 1:00-1:50
Matt Giancarlo
A survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the later seventeenth century, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the early English literary tradition. Texts and authors covered may include Beowulf and Old English elegiac poetry; Middle English poetry and selections from Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales; Renaissance lyrics, sonnets, and narrative poetry; the drama of Shakespeare; selections from John Milton's Paradise Lost; and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement and Early Period requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 331.
 
ENG 251 001  Survey of American Lit I
MWF 10:00-10:50
Alyssa MacLean
 
ENG 260 001  Introduction to Black Writers: Contemporary African-American Fiction
MWF 9:00-9:50
Matthew Godbey

This course explores African-American literature during the past four decades. We will use works of fiction written since 1975 to examine how various authors use literature to explore contemporary issues related to race, identity and the lingering effects of historical issues such as slavery, Jim Crow, the great migration, and civil rights. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. Class participation and attendance, response papers, in-class quizzes and writings, and a final exam.  Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit. Same as AAS 264.
 
ENG 260 002  Introduction to Black Writers: Contemporary African-American Fiction
M 5:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Vershawn A. Young
This course will be conducted in class and online, and takes a personal, historical, and performative approach to written and oral works by Black authors of the United States and to some extent the Black Diaspora. Attention will be paid to student writing and public speaking.
ENG 266 001  Survey of African-American Lit II
TR 9:30-10:45
Rynetta Davis

A survey of African-American literature from the mid-eighteenth century to Reconstruction and after, with emphasis on selected genres, periods, and thematic characteristics of the early African-American cultural and literary experience. Topics include colonialism and abolitionism; early black aesthetics, narratives of enslavement, and drama, novels, and poetry. Authors can include Jupiter Hammon, Phillis Wheatley, William Wells Brown, George Moses Horton, Martin Delaney, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, Ellen Craft, and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 271 001 The Bible as Literature
MWF 10:00- 10:50
Tikva Meroz-Aharoni 
ENG 280 001  Introduction to Film
MWF 10:00-10:50
Janice Oaks

This course examines some significant aspects of film (for example, genre, narrative structure, mise-en-scene) in order to write interestingly and profitably about them.  The course focuses on issues of gender, sexuality, race, and other identity markers which bear heavily on the cultural narratives permeating movies.  Looking at films from past eras as well as those produced lately will broaden our understanding of the historical changes in film production and various movie code directives. Major assignments include three short papers, a brief in-class presentation, and much stimulating discussion.  Students will view films outside of class. 

ENG 280 002  Introduction to Film
MWF 11:00-11:50

 

ENG 280 003  Introduction to Film
MWF 11:00-11:50
Guy Spriggs
This section of English 280 is built around controversy: films that are notorious for challenging industry standards and/or audience expectations through form, content, and production. The contexts of controversy can give us unique insights to changes in culture and film history. In viewing films such as Psycho, Night of the Living Dead, A Clockwork Orange, and Reservoir Dogs, we will not only ask what makes certain films controversial, but also how the legacies of these films can soften or deepen over time. How and why do filmmakers cultivate controversy? What role do narrative and formal elements play in film controversy? By engaging with these films and critical concepts, you will improve your ability to read film and engage in analysis and writing.

ENG 280 004  Introduction to Film: Growing Up Cinematic
MWF 12:00-12:50

Guy Spriggs
This section of English 280 is built around controversy: films that are notorious for challenging industry standards and/or audience expectations through form, content, and production. The contexts of controversy can give us unique insights to changes in culture and film history. In viewing films such as Psycho, Night of the Living Dead, A Clockwork Orange, and Reservoir Dogs, we will not only ask what makes certain films controversial, but also how the legacies of these films can soften or deepen over time. How and why do filmmakers cultivate controversy? What role do narrative and formal elements play in film controversy? By engaging with these films and critical concepts, you will improve your ability to read film and engage in analysis and writing.
 
ENG 280 005  Introduction to Film
MWF 1:00-1:50
Matt Godbey
This course will introduce students to the language and aesthetics of cinema by examining images of the city in American films throughout the 20th and 21st Centuries. Using specific films as case studies, students will learn how to examine cinematic representation within specific historical, cultural, and political contexts. More specifically, the films will serve as a starting point for conversations about cities and urban society and the relationship between film and the urban experience. Our readings throughout this semester will focus on the art, economy, and politics of cinema, which will help us to deepen our appreciation for the ways motion pictures are constructed and make meaning, and to tackle issues dealing with the urban experience throughout American history.  

 

ENG 280 006  Introduction to Film
TR 11:00-12:15
Walter Foreman
            This section of ENG 280 is an introduction to the study of the movies as a narrative art and a cultural document, with emphasis on the former.  The movies we will watch will be chosen from a variety of genres, national cinemas, and time periods.  The course will develop students' skills in interpretation and analysis of film and in evaluating competing interpretations of films.  The "evaluation" of movies we will do will not be about assigning stars or pointing thumbs up or down, nor will the evaluation of interpretations necessarily be designed to accept one and reject its competitors.  All the movies for this section will be about—though not at all exclusively about—monsters.  What makes something a "monster"?  How are monsters made?  Who makes monsters?  What is the relation between "monster" and "point of view"?  "Monsters" are a thread, a common theme we will follow through the course, though we will be no means treat each movie as simply a "monster movie."  We are not tracing a genre: only two or at most three of our movies would be likely to show up in a list of either "monster" or "horror" movies.  We will visit many other genres: westerns, private eye movies, comedies (silent and screwball), science fiction, psychological thrillers, musicals, and more.  Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities.  Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement.  Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit.  Provides ENG minor credit.  Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.
 
ENG 280 007  Introduction to Film
TR 12:30-1:45
Rachel Hoy
English 280 is an introduction to film analysis and to the study of film as visual and narrative art. To comprehend movies as aparticular form of narrative art, this class will focus on films that have been adapted from other genres of storytelling. With the proliferation of novels and stories adapted to films, we often lose sight of the fact that these two forms of storytelling are fundamentally different. In fact, many of us go to the movies today because we loved a book. In order to debunk this similarity, we will read text and film against each other. Armed with the terminology of the formal elements of film and historical contexts, we will discuss the similarities and differences between texts and films, determining how each is a unique cultural document in its own right. Students will be responsible for applying knowledge gained from class discussions and readings in analytical interpretations of the course films.
 
ENG 280 008  Introduction to Film
TR 3:30-4:45
John D Howell
This is a basic introduction to the study of film, which includes film history as well as elements of film form such as mise-en-scène, cinematography, sound, editing, film genres, and the narrative structures of films.  Each of those subjects brings with it an array of terms that we’ll use when discussing and analyzing films; our required text, The Film Experience (3nd. ed.), will be the source of those terms and a resource for explanations and illustrations, supplemented by the frequent in-class screening of clips, trailers, and shorts (even a cartoon or two).  But our primary focus will be 12-13 feature-length films that range across time -- from the 1920s to this year -- and genres (comedy, horror, western, crime etc.).  There will be at least one silent film, one foreign film, several black-and-white films, and R-rated films; all will be screened twice on the day before we discuss them, and all will be on reserve in the library.  Each week will feature a different film, and by the end of the semester you will have seen some of the world’s great films, plus you’ll be acquainted with many film artists and films that are new to you -- you’ll be a much more sophisticated filmgoer.  Your grade for the course will be based on weekly short quizzes, two essays totalling fifteen pages, a midterm exam and a final exam.

 
ENG 280 009  Introduction to Film
TR 5:00-6:15
Rachel Hoy
English 280 is an introduction to film analysis and to the study of film as visual and narrative art. To comprehend movies as aparticular form of narrative art, this class will focus on films that have been adapted from other genres of storytelling. With the proliferation of novels and stories adapted to films, we often lose sight of the fact that these two forms of storytelling are fundamentally different. In fact, many of us go to the movies today because we loved a book. In order to debunk this similarity, we will read text and film against each other. Armed with the terminology of the formal elements of film and historical contexts, we will discuss the similarities and differences between texts and films, determining how each is a unique cultural document in its own right. Students will be responsible for applying knowledge gained from class discussions and readings in analytical interpretations of the course films.
 
ENG 280 010  Introduction to Film
TR 11:00-12:15
John D Howell
This is a basic introduction to the study of film, which includes film history as well as elements of film form such as mise-en-scène, cinematography, sound, editing, film genres, and the narrative structures of films.  Each of those subjects brings with it an array of terms that we’ll use when discussing and analyzing films; our required text, The Film Experience (3nd. ed.), will be the source of those terms and a resource for explanations and illustrations, supplemented by the frequent in-class screening of clips, trailers, and shorts (even a cartoon or two).  But our primary focus will be 12-13 feature-length films that range across time -- from the 1920s to this year -- and genres (comedy, horror, western, crime etc.).  There will be at least one silent film, one foreign film, several black-and-white films, and R-rated films; all will be screened twice on the day before we discuss them, and all will be on reserve in the library.  Each week will feature a different film, and by the end of the semester you will have seen some of the world’s great films, plus you’ll be acquainted with many film artists and films that are new to you -- you’ll be a much more sophisticated filmgoer.  Your grade for the course will be based on weekly short quizzes, two essays totalling fifteen pages, a midterm exam and a final exam.
ENG 290 001  Introduction to Women’s Literature (Honor's Section)
MWF 10:00-10:50

ENG 290 002  Introduction to Women’s Literature
MWF 11:00-11:50
Cheryl E Cardiff

Description: "This is an introductory course that aims to examine representations of women in literature, as told by women writers. To give us a grasp of such writings, texts will range from the imaginative literature to nonfiction, from literary fiction to chick lit. As we concentrate on these primary texts, we’ll look to secondary and background literature to help bring some more perspective on them. Special attention will be given to topics such as mother-daughter relationships, female (un)bonding, and sexuality. Coursework includes: active participation in class discussions, brief text responses, and two analytical essays.  Sample texts: Mary Wollstonecraft, The Wrongs of Woman; Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; William Wyler's Little Foxes based on Lillian Hellman's play and screenplay; Nawal El Saadawi, Woman at Point Zero; Rajaa Alsanea, Girls of Riyadh."

 

ENG 290 003  Introduction to Women’s Literature: Silence, Resistance, and Betrayal
TR 2:00-3:15
Marion Rust
 
ENG 301 001
MWF 11:00-11:50
Elizabeth Ann Connors Manke 
This course is designed for students who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others.  While the course may include some account of historical changes in prose style and require some stylistic analysis of literary texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students’ own writing.  Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination, subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace.  Prereq:  Completion of Composition and Communication requirement and consent of instructor.

 

ENG 301 002
TR 12:30-1:45
William F. Endres
This course is designed for students who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others.  While the course may include some account of historical changes in prose style and require some stylistic analysis of literary texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students’ own writing.  Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination, subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace.  Prereq:  Completion of Composition and Communication requirement and consent of instructor.

 

ENG 330 001  Text and Context:
MWF 12:00-12:50
Matthew Godbey
Colson Whitehead’s The Intuitionist (1999), is a complex novel that simultaneously draws from the canon of African American literature and looks forward to key stylistic and thematic trends that define African American literature in the late 20th and early 21st Centuries: While it tells a story of the great migration and the mid-twentieth century urban experience, issues well-represented in the canon of African American literature, it does so by placing its protagonist in an alternative universe and adopting the tropes of science fiction and hardboiled detective fiction. Our course will use the novel’s mix of historical allusions and genre experiments as a jumping off point to explore works of fiction that help us understand the historical context of the novel as well as recent novels that reflect its diversity and variety. Over the course of the semester we will look at African American literature both as a literary tradition in its own right and as a lens through which we can better see contemporary African American and American culture as a whole. 

 

ENG 330 002  Text and Context: 

TR 11:00-12:15
Rynetta Davis

ENG 330 003  Text and Context: 
TR 12:30-1:45
E B Rosenman

Anthony Trollope’s satiric novel The Way We Live Now is on everyone’s list of eerily relevant Victorian novels. Its portrait of greed, ambition, social climbing, obscene wealth, investment scams, overreaching, and economic and personal catastrophe could be a contemporary story of capitalism run amok – think the Enron scandal or The Wolf of Wall Street. Bringing elite English men and women into contact with shady financiers -- and even with Americans -- it registers the impact of new money as it infects everything from Parliamentary elections to marriage. Expansive and hugely entertaining, the novel gives us a glimpse of our modern economic and social world in the process of being formed.

Expect to do semi-regular short blog posts, an oral report, and a 10-page paper. Our ongoing project will be to create a wiki of the novel, with the help of Victorian sources, that will help future readers understand its complex social and economic world (these assignments can be linked so they build on each other).  You can get a sense of this project by looking at a similar wiki done by an ENG 330 class focused on George Eliot’s novel Middlemarch (http://middlemarchuk.pbworks.com/w/page/54359342/FrontPage).

This course fulfills the Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR).

 
ENG 337 001 LIT and Genre: Native American Lit
TR 9:30-10:45
Michael Carter
Whether through films, historical texts, stereotypes, or even sport team mascots, Native Americans have been viewed the lens of European Americans. In this course, Native Americans will speak through their own mythologies, novels, short stories and poetry. Beginning with early myths and continuing up to the 21st century, this class will listen to these voices, see their own literature, and begin to know better America’s first settlers. With a focus primarily on 20th century Native American writers: Leslie Silko, Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, James Welch, Sherman Alexie and many others, we will explore these distinct voices as they tell their stories. The course will include daily readings, research, essays, quizzes and exams 
 
ENG 337 002 LIT and Genre: Revenge Tragedy
TR 11:00-12:15
Joyce MacDonald
The topic of this section is Revenge Tragedy. One of the most enduring genres of Renaissance drama, revenge tragedy questioned individuals’ moral obligation to a society that often seemed indifferent to their fates. It wondered whether justice was even possible under a social order that ignored the suffering of the innocent and let the powerful and guilty walk free, daring to suggest that revenge was often the closest thing to justice we can hope for. In this course, we will study the most powerful sixteenth and seventeenth century examples of revenge tragedy, as well as more modern stories of the possibility of righteous vengeance as the most fitting—or even only—chance for justice. Reading responses, two exams, final paper. 
 
ENG 339 001 Author Studies: Austen
TR 2:00-3:15
Michael Trask
A study of the greatest English novelist.  We’ll read all her novels (Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Mansfield Park, Persuasion).  We’ll pay special attention to the development of Austen’s style, which became the dominant narrative mode of fiction after her (free indirect discourse); to her preferred theme (the marriage plot); to her context (the transition from the revolutionary 18th century to the industrialized 19th); and to the role that literary texts might be said to play within that context.  There will be a focus on gender issues, and there will be just as much focus on issues of class.  We’ll be guided by the strange fact that although Austen everywhere in her novels champions the wedding of shabby-genteel women of exquisite parts to their social superiors, she herself was an unmarried woman who practiced a professional trade.  This mismatch between biography and art opens the door to a number of speculations about the tension between old and new classes, old and new gender arrangements, and old and new forms of representation. All of these Austen embodies, and all of these we shall explore.
ENG 342 001  Shakespeare
TR 9:30-10:45
W C Foreman
            An introductory survey of Shakespeare's plays, covering all forms (comedies, histories, and tragedies) and periods (early, middle, and late).  We will examine Shakespearean theater and performance (physical and philosophical architecture, performance as interpretation, visualization of written texts, audience as part of action, play as play); Shakespearean language and its relation to "truth" (arguments, meanings, metaphors, puns, verse, poetry: in short, wordplay); the way the structure of the plays produces meaning (function and order of scenes); the way words make characters, and the way characters interact, verbally and visually; and the social implications of the plays (for both the 16/17th and the 20th centuries) and the ways audiences (including ourselves) interpret the plays.  Likely to be included are A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Richard II, Henry IV Part 1, Othello, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Tempest.
ENG 345 001  British Poetry
MWF 10:00-10:50
Jill N. Rappoport-Genovese 
The nineteenth century was a time of startling and dramatic changes: railroads and industry gave England a new pace; colonial projects expanded its sense of space; and the theory of evolution gave it a new idea of its place in history. What role did poetry have—what forms did it take—in these shifting contexts? How did it gauge and respond to the changing times? This course explores the ways in which poetic forms dealt with and deflected the challenges of modernity. Poets and poetry critics borrowed, rejected, or sought to surpass the past by grappling with their individual, national, and poetic inheritance. In the process, they created a wealth of poetry that was both inviting and innovative; sharp and sensual; moving and remarkably modern.
Whatever your relationship to poetry is—whether you write your own or really only read prose!—this class will help you to better read, appreciate, discuss, and analyze verse. We’ll explore a range of rich and provocative ballads, dramatic monologues, and lyric and narrative verse by Tennyson, Browning, Barrett Browning, C. Rossetti, D. Rossetti, Hopkins. We will also spend time on the sounds of poetry. While today we tend to think of poetry as a private experience, during the nineteenth century poetry was often read aloud, and written with that reading in mind. Speaking and listening to poetic language will help us to better understand its rhythms, form, and meanings. Course requirements include a final recitation, frequent short written assignments, and two essays. 

ENG 349 001  Modernism
TR 12:30-1:45
Jonathan Allison

A course on Modernist Literature: British, Irish and American writing from the first half of the twentieth century. Virginia Woolf once tried to explain modernism by claiming, “On or about December 1910 human character changed.” Much of the writing of the period—including fiction, poetry, plays and essays—might be read as an attempt to record and understand that change. Readings will include the work of writers such as James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, Wyndham Lewis and Gertrude Stein. The literature of the period will be examined in relation to various contexts and backgrounds, including the experience of war, the breakup of empire, the assertion of nationhood, the exploration of artistic and literary form, and other processes and events. Various required texts, including Lawrence Rainey (editor), Modernism: An Anthology, 2005.  Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.

ENG 352 001  American Literature and Cultures to 1900
MWF 12:00-12:50
Alyssa Maclean

ENG 357 001  Contemporary American Literature
MWF 11:00-11:50
Matthew Godbey 

ENG 384 001  Literature and Film
TR 2:00-3:15
Armando Prats

I don’t want to turn this course into a self-congratulatory snob-fest, where each of us sagely concludes, as if it were a moral obligation, that the literary text—the Source, as it were—is (always) superior to the cinematic “adaptation.” The word itself—adaptation—implies and presumes that the movies conform to some sacred and inviolable totality perfectly contained, somehow, in the Book. The Book, we assume, is itself integrally; the movie is its derivative, easy to dispense with, a “visualization” for those who cannot see words. More important, perhaps, the Book is always the beginning, the Origin, the Source: “In the beginning was the Word.” So we all know what follows: having read the Book, we give a patronizing nod to the movie and render the inevitable judgment: the Book is not only “better,” the movie is superfluous. I want, instead, to explore the possibilities of the relation between story and narrative—that is, between the what and the how and of whatever may actively buzz and shimmer and throb somewhere between them. Thus, while we may wish to cultivate a special regard to particular texts, we do not care to reduce their possibilities to a “good-bad” binary (something that is, in a way, implicit in the very title of this course). We will accordingly learn not only about but from the way in which these texts narrate their stories, trying always to see the good in all of them, and the way in which each narrative act complements and enriches the other.

The texts that I propose to study are:

Macbeth (Shakespeare) and Throne of Blood (Kurosawa)
King Lear (Shakespeare) and Ran (Kurosawa)
Heart of Darkness (Conrad) and Apocalypse Now (Coppola)
The Maltese Falcon (Hammett and Huston)
“In a Grove” (Akutagawa) and Rashomon (Kurosawa)
“Tema del Heroe y el Traidor” (Borges) and The Spider’s Stratagem (Bertolucci)
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (Larsson [book], Oplev [Swedish version]; Fincher [American version].
 The Life of Pi (Martel [book]; Lee [movie])

Viewing films outside of class is required. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. ENG 280, 284, or 285 recommended but not required. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 

Eng 395 001 Independent Work
 
ENG 401 001 Special Topics in Writing: Comics Israel/Palest
TR 9:30-10:45
Janice Fernheimer
Though Israel/Palestine, peace, conflict, and the Middle East appear frequently in the daily news, people often don’t understand what all the fuss is about, and why the conflict(s) appear so seemingly unsolvable. This course will offer a unique opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the many conflicts within and between Israeli and Palestinian societies by looking at them through the lens of graphic narratives. We’ll read a number of graphic novels/autobiographies/journalistic texts including but not limited to Sarah Glidden’s How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less, Harvey Pekar’s and J.T. Waldman’s Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me, Joe Sacco’s famous serial Palestine and its sequel Footnotes in Gaza, as well as a variety of other texts to see how words and images have shaped and limited the ways the Israeli/Palestinian conflicts and potential solutions to them are represented. We’ll analyze key concepts: homeland, settlements, Zionism, diaspora, occupied territories, refugees, citizenship, and cease-fire, from Israeli, Palestinian, and other perspectives to better understand how they shape narratives about memory, history, and identity, both national and individual. Since the graphic genre is a relatively new literary development, we will pay careful attention to how it offers new affordances and limitations for representing these complex relationships. As this will be a writing intensive course, we will explore these issues as a means of sharpening your critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Students may have additional opportunities to interact with authors/artists through Skype-facilitated guest lectures.
 
ENG 401 002 Special Topics in Writing: Writing with Animals
TR 12:30-1:45
Roxanne Mountford
 
ENG 401 001 Special Topics in Writing: Rhet of Black Sermon
TR 2:00-3:15
Adam Banks
 
 
ENG 407 001  Intermediate Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Creative Non-Fiction
T 5:00-7:30
Erik Reece
The term "creative nonfiction" asks us to begin thinking of the essay as a story that uses many narrative devices of fiction-writing to not only tell the truth, but to shape the truth. A successful piece of creative nonfiction should make the world appear a more intense and interesting place than its reader previously imagined. It shows the writer intimately engaging the world, and it shows us a compelling view of the world through that writer's lens. Simply put, the goal of this course is to that make art out of experience. 

ENG 407 002  Intermediate Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Poetry
M 5:00-7:30
John D Howell

This course will build upon the foundation established in ENG 207.  Students will be expected to demonstrate greater understanding of the art and craft in published poems; to employ their heightened knowledge and skills in poetry exercises, including more work with formal verse; and to write poems that always strive for their best possible expression, which our conscientious and constructive workshopping will try to help them attain.  Course-work:  in-class and out-of-class exercises; informal written responses to published poems; active participation in annotating and workshopping poems by peers;  twelve poems.
 
ENG 407 003  Intermediate Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction
W 5:00-7:30
W. Andrew Ewell
 
ENG 440G 001  Studies in British Literature: The New World
TR 12:30-1:45
Joyce MacDonald
This section is subtitled “The New World”. In it, we will study sixteenth and seventeenth century literature written out of the experience of European encounters with the lands and people of North America and the Caribbean. These writings—poetry, plays, apparently objective narrative descriptions of the sights, sounds, and natives of a new continent—show British writers in the act of naming the kinds of relationships they could have with the American lands that would become their nation’s colonies. Reading them, we will learn how the Renaissance learned to think about race, about profit, and about the environment. In our process, we will also try to judge how many of these ideas about a new world—or at least a world that was new to the British—depended on ideas they brought with them from the old. Reading responses/quizzes, two exams, final paper.
ENG 480G 001  Studies in Film: Black Love as Resistance
TR 3:30-4:45
Frank X Walker

In this course students will examine the power and beauty of black love and deconstruct how it is portrayed in film. We will discuss films that depict love in all its many facets from self to polyamorous as well as explore the power dynamics between filmmakers and subjects. Some of the films that will be discussed will include The Amistad, Glory, Birth of a Nation, The Color Purple, Pinky, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, She's Gotta Have It, Jungle Fever, Love Jones, Daughters of the Dust, Best Man Holiday and others. The filmmakers will include Oscar Micheaux, Julie Dash, Spike Lee, Reginal Hudlin, Haile Gerima, and Ka'ramuu Kush.

 
 
ENG 490G 001  Studies Lit Gender: Victorians Then and Now
TR 9:30-10:45
E B Rosenman
What is it about the 19th century British novel that keeps calling us back? Why do we not only revisit our favorites but make them new, bring their characters and stories into the present day, insert new characters into their worlds, revise their politics, zombify them, translate them into new media?  In this course, you will read several novels and their reincarnations, learn critical theories of adaptation and remediation (recasting a text into a different medium, such as a novel into a movie), and formulate your own ideas about texts and their afterlives.

Some probable combinations of 19th-century novels and modern versions: Jane Austen’s  Emma and the film Clueless; Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations, Peter Carey’s novel Jack Maggs, and at least one of several film adaptations of Great Expectations; Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Valerie Martin’s novel Mary Reilly. We’ll also read an example of steampunk, a genre that combines Victorian steam power with alternative settings and histories.

Expect to several short, informal writing assignments, a short paper, and a major project that will involve research as well as your own ideas. You’ll have three choices for this project: (1) a formal essay involving a text or texts from the class (recommended for students who will be applying to graduate school) (2) a paper on an adaptation or neo-Victorian work that we haven’t read in class (3) your own adaptation of a 19th-century novel, in any medium.

 
ENG 507 001 Advanced Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Poetry
R 5:00-7:30pm
Julia Johnson
 

 

We meet once a week for an extended meeting of poets. We will write poems and we may even cross into new genres. We will leave our comfort zones. This class is devoted to poems by you, and by others. It is a workshop-based class. We will discuss the art and craft of writing poems, and we will workshop one another's work with enthusiasm and care. We will also read an extensive amount of poetry by modern and contemporary writers from around the world.

 

ADDITIONAL COURSE COMPONENT: CHOOSE ONE

 

1. Your semester will be spent with this poet; think of this poet as someone who will

be a major figure for you during the term. You will read all of the work possible to

read in print by this writer, and you will also read (if available) outside criticism,

interviews, essays, etc., on this writer. Near the end of the semester, you will lead a

15-20 minute discussion of the work of “your” poet.

 

2. This component of the course could include the investigation of graduate programs

in creative writing including the preparation of applications. Students who choose

this option will take part in every stage of the application--from researching

programs, to selecting a program, to working on manuscripts in progress, to

preparing a strong writing sample for the application materials. Near the end of the

semester, you will present your writing sample and your essay for admission, in the

form of a presentation.

 

ENG 507 002 Advanced Workshop in Imaginative Writing: Fiction
W 5:00-7:30pm
Gurney Norman

English 507-002 Fiction is an advanced course for experienced writers in which students practice short story, novel and experimental fiction writing.  The class meetings feature writing exercises in which students display their understanding of various elements of traditional story-writing such as plot development, dialogue, description, character development and point of view.  Students are asked to produce during the semester three original, polished short stories or chapters that represent the student’s best effort.  Students are invited to read their work aloud in class for discussion but this is not a requirement. The reading component includes selected stories by American, English, and Russian authors.

ENG/EDC 509 401  Composition for Teachers
T 6:00-8:30
Brandon S Abdon

A course covering the basic studies helpful to teachers of composition at the secondary level. Focuses on the teaching of grammar, punctuation, usage, etc., and on theme planning, correction, and revision. Students are required to do quite a bit of writing. Same as EDC 509. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.

 
ENG 510 001  Studies English for Teachers: Vernacular Englishes
W 5:00-7:30pm
Vershawn A Young

Global and world Englishes have become need-to-know topics for teachers and the educated public. This course surveys imaginative literature, conversations, and debates, about what can be called vernacular Englishes, Englishes spoken by a range of everyday folk from various ethnicities, Englishes that tend to be undervalued in academic and professional settings. While multifarious Englishes will be examined and discussed, particular attention will be given to Applachian, African American, Affrilachian, American Pidgins, and U.S. Creoles.
ENG/LIN 512 001  Analysis of English Syntax
MWF 9:00-9:50

 

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