Undergraduate Courses

 

Fall 2020 Courses

For Undergraduate Curriculum click here

 

More course descriptions coming soon!

 

ENG 100 ORIENTATION TO THE ENGLISH MAJOR

Michelle R. Sizemore

This course serves as an orientation to the benefits and requirements of majoring in English. You will learn about multiple literary traditions, including American literature, African American literature, British literature, Creative Writing, and Film. You will meet professors, learn how to earn honors and do internships in English, hear about fellowships and study abroad opportunities, and discover different careers for English majors. You will get to know fellow English majors and have the chance to get involved with extra-curricular activities in the English Department. In addition to providing practical know-how, this class raises philosophical and conceptual questions for our consideration and discussion throughout the semester, questions guided by a collection of short readings. Why is it important to study language, literature, and the humanities? How will the English major prepare you for life and a career in the 21st century? This class will put you on a track to excel and get the most out of your major.

 
ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Janet Carey Eldred
 
ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Andrew Malan Milward
 
This course is an introduction to three genres of creative writing: fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Students will first learn the craft elements unique to each genre by reading widely from professional examples before applying that knowledge toward the composition of their own original stories, essays, and poems. Students will meet both in a large lecture class and in smaller breakout sessions where their creative works will be discussed and critiqued. This course fulfills the UK Core requirement for Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity.
 
ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Michael W. Carter
 
This introductory course in creative writing will explore the various genre: we will play with poetry, fiddle with fiction and nonfiction, as well as grace our souls with other genre. The class will read and discuss literature in various delightful forms to help us understand technique and voice, and practice writing and critiquing our own writing. We will often work in small groups (depending on the number enrolled) as a workshopping method for finding our voices as writers, and for helping our classmates find theirs. By the semester’s end, we will have a mini portfolio of writing.
 
ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Frank X Walker
 
ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Erik A. Reece 
 
ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Titus William Chalk
 
This course will dive into the nuts and bolts of three literary genres, namely fiction, nonfiction and poetry. Together, we will develop the craft tools to read and write better, producing work in all three genres, leading up to a final portfolio of original writing. More than that, though, we will equip ourselves to create meaning in a chaotic universe and begin to define our place in it. This course also fulfils the UK Core requirement for Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity. What’s not to love?
 
ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Michael McEwen
 
ENG 130 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Speculative Fiction
Matthew W. Godbey
 
ENG 130 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Villians
Michael E. Genovese
 
ENG 130 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS:
Jill Naomi Rappoport
 
ENG 130 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Banned Books: From Huckleberry to Harry
Michael W. Carter
 
Why are school districts and some parents afraid of Harry Potter, Huckleberry Finn or others? Why are certain works and their characters’ words either avoided or expurgated to gain admittance into the corridors of high schools and libraries? This course will read these works and examine the historical and cultural reasons for the books’ being challenged in the past or today. Poems such as Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” and Ginsberg’s “Howl” have rallied opponents to suppress their inclusion in anthologies. We’ll try to redeem or reject these texts through close readings and research into the complaints about the books and into the themes of the texts. Coursework will include readings and two 5-7 analytical essays, one collaborative project, as well as shorter writing assignments.
 
ENG 130 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Weird Books
Matthew C. Giancarlo
 
This is a course in “Weird Books,” what might otherwise be called “experimental fiction” or “metafiction” but including narratives that are, in some sense, just weird: startling, unexpected, strangely humorous or different. We will read works from several genres (dramas, novels, short stories) that play with conventions and expectations, or that violate basic assumptions about perception and narrative. Authors may include Franz Kafka, Fran Ross, Vladimir Nabokov, Flannery O’Connor, Jorge Luis Borges, Ursula K. Le Guin, Italo Calvino, and others. Our tasks will be: 1) to read and enjoy these stories; 2) to reflect upon how they work; and 3) to write both critically and creatively under their influence.
 
ENG 171 GLOBAL LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
Peter J. Kalliney
 
ENG 180 GREAT MOVIES: The American 70s
John D. Howell
 
ENG 180 GREAT MOVIES: Popular African Films
Kamahra Ewing
 
ENG 180 GREAT MOVIES: The Hitchcock Thriller
Walter C. Foreman
 
ENG 191 LITERATURE AND THE ARTS OF CITIZENSHIP: Immigrant Narratives - This is My Home (Now)
Jennifer Leigh Murray
 
ENG 207 BEG WKSHP CRTV WRT: Poetry
Gabrielle Elise Oliver
 
ENG 207 BEG WKSHP CRTV WRT: Digital Spaces
DaMaris B. Hill
 
ENG 207 BEG WKSHP CRTV WRT: Fiction
Gavin Paul Colton
 
ENG 207 BEG WKSHP CRTV WRT: Screenwriting
John D. Howell
 
ENG 230 INTRO TO LIT: 21st-century literary studies
Janet Carey Eldred
 
ENG 230 INTRO TO LIT: 21st-century literary studies
Janet Carey Eldred
 
ENG 230 INTRO TO LIT: Plot Twists and Subverted Expectations
Kathryn J. McClain
 
ENG 241 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE
Matthew C. Giancarlo
 
ENG 242 Survey of British Literature II
Lisa Zunshine
 
ENG 260 INTRODUCTION TO BLACK WRITERS
Jake A. Ferrington
 
ENG 265 SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE I
Nazera S. Wright
 
ENG 280 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Jordan Robert Brower
 
ENG 280 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Matthew W. Godbey
 
ENG 280 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Michael W. Carter
 
This introductory film course will examine the lens through which film making shows us ourselves, our world, and our ever changing culture. Since film’s earliest days controversies have waxed and waned within the cinema (violence, sex, and language anyone?) and various methods of censoring or restricting the medium have been attempted, and still film thrives as a major industry. Perhaps films persist because whether live actors, animation, historical, contemporary, or futuristic, film presents a view of humanity that the writers and directors bring to life visually, aurally, and emotionally. We will consider all parts of the process and product. This class will require out-of-class viewing of films (approximately one a week) through some external means, Amazon, Hulu, Netflix, etc. and you will come to class ready to discuss the various means through which the film makers develop their craft: cinematography, sound, editing, narrative structure, and so forth. You will be required to write several critical responses to the films which will be the bulk of your grade for the course. The remainder of the grade will be determined from attendance, quizzes, and a midterm test.
 
ENG 280 010 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Frederick K Bengtsson
 
ENG 280 012 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Emily Diane Naser-Hall
 
The horror genre has experienced something of a renaissance in recent years, with films such as Hereditary and Get Out joining the canon of horror greats like Halloween and Night of the Living Dead. But why do we seek out films that will keep us up at night checking for monsters under the bed? Why do we like being scared? Is it maybe because we know that we already live in a nationwide haunted house with an ugly past that could come for us at any time? This section of Introduction to Film focuses on the genre of horror within American cinema and considers how horror movies invite us to rethink the roles that fear, guilt, shame, and history play in the way we conceive of the American nation. We will look at films from the early 1900s to the present to explore how filmmakers turn the American experience into a terrifying nightmare and force us to consider horror as a genre about marginalization and erasure. By analyzing films about the American horror story, students will learn the proper vocabulary for speaking about the techniques and forms of cinema. Assignments will involve weekly quizzes, short writing assignments, and a final exam. Fulfills the UK Core requirement in Humanities.
 
ENG 280 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Walter C. Foreman
 
ENG 290 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S LITERATURE: Radical Women Across Literature
Margaret P. Kelly
 
ENG 307 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING: Writing on Art
Julia Mae Johnson
 
ENG 330 TEXT AND CONTEXT: Hamlet
Emily E. Shortslef
 
ENG 330 TEXT AND CONTEXT: O Pioneers!
Matthew W. Godbey
 
ENG 330 TEXT AND CONTEXT: (SR)
Frederick K Bengtsson
 
ENG 330 TEXT AND CONTEXT: (SR)
Jill Naomi Rappoport
 
ENG 343 Renaissance Drama and Society
Joyce M. MacDonald
 
ENG 359 The Kentucky Literary Heritage
Crystal E. Wilkinson
 
ENG 361 Early African-American Literature
Nazera S. Wright
 
ENG 380 Film and Genre: Documentary Film Shorts
Catharine Cole Axley
 
ENG 384 LITERATURE AND FILM: Awkward Ages
Jordan Robert Brower
 
ENG 407 INTERM WKSP CTV WRIT: Fiction Structures
DaMaris B. Hill
 
ENG 407 INTERM WKSP CTV WRIT: (SR) (fiction)
John D. Howell
 
ENG 407 INTERM WKSP CTV WRIT: (SR) (poetry)
Jane Ansel Elkins
 
ENG 425 ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING
Randall Roorda
 
ENG 425 ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING
Randall Roorda
 
ENG 440G Studies in British Literature: The Poetry of Soul and Satire
Michael E. Genovese
 
ENG 450G Studies in American Literature: Animals in Literature, Ethics, and Popular Culture
Michael A. Trask
 
ENG 495 HONORS SEMINAR: British Literature and the Left
Peter J. Kalliney
 

 

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