Spring Courses

 

Spring 2022

 

ENG 107 001-004 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING 
Erik Reece
M varies, WF 1:00

This is an introductory course in creative writing, one meant to both invite students into the world of contemporary literature and to participate in that rich experience. This class aims to familiarize students with 1) the basic elements of creative writing and 2) three genres: fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students will be asked to both read actively by mastering the terms of literary analysis and write imaginatively by using the texts we study as models. By the end of the course, you will have produced a body of work in which you can take pride and will have prepared yourself to move on to upper-level creative writing classes, if that is your goal. If it is not, this class aims to prepare you for being an engaged, appreciative, life-long student of creative writing—also known as literature. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 107 005-008 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Frank X Walker
MW 12:00, F varies

This course is designed to offer an introduction to the genres and craft of imaginative writing, including fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Students will read and discuss the work of published writers, practice creating their own original writing in various genres, and practice peer editing techniques. This is an introductory course in creative writing for the novice. Successful participants will demonstrate an understanding of how poetry and prose can express ideas and emotions. Classes will consist of large lectures, discussions, and crafting and reviews in required smaller groups. Some sessions will occur online. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 107 009-012 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Andrew Milward
MW 11:00, F varies

This course is an introduction to three genres of creative writing: fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Students will first learn the craft elements unique to each genre by reading widely from professional examples before applying that knowledge toward the composition of their own original stories, essays, and poems. Students will meet both in a large lecture class and in smaller breakout sessions where their creative works will be discussed and critiqued. This course fulfills the UK Core requirement for Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity. UK Core: Arts & Creativity

ENG 107 013 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Michael Carter
TR 9:30
 
This introductory course in creative writing will explore the various genre: we will play with poetry, fiddle with fiction and nonfiction, as well as grace our souls with other genre. The class will read and discuss literature in various delightful forms to help us understand technique and voice, and practice writing and critiquing our own writing. We will often work in small groups (depending on the number enrolled) as a workshopping method for finding our voices as writers, and for helping our classmates find theirs. By the semester’s end, we will have a mini portfolio of writing. UK Core: Arts & Creativity
ENG 107 014 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Allegra Solomon
TR 11:00

An introduction to the genres and craft of creative writing, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will study and practice writing in various modes through composition, peer critique, and research. Lecture or lecture with discussion section. Provides ENG minor credit. UK Core: Arts & Creativity
ENG 130 001 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Tales of Villainy
Michael Genovese
MWF 1:00

How often have you been reading a book and the bad guy seems so much more appealing than the forces of good?  Or how often have you wondered whether the villain in the book is really so guilty of wrongdoing?  Is the "good guy" really so clearly beyond reproach? In this course we will explore plays, novels, short stories, and poems in which villains clearly emerge, but our goal will be to look beyond good and evil.  What is the nature of the villainy?  What is its significance?  Does the bad character represent something bigger than himself, or is he an anomaly?  Is evil always some version of the same thing, or does it work differently depending on the context?  How does the literature contain the threat he or she poses, and are you buying it?  Readings will be drawn from British and American sources from the Renaissance to the twenty-first century.   The class will feature a few papers as well as a midterm and final exam. UK Core: Arts & Creativity
ENG 130 002 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: 21c Science Fiction
Michael Trask
MWF 3:00

This class explores a handful of prominent science fiction writers whose work has been composed since around the year 2000. Themes will include apocalypticism, the domination of social life by artificial intelligence, the breakdown of civil society and the customary Western social contract, the ascent of social media technology and its potent and world-shaping algorithms, fraught interactions with the (alien) other or stranger, and the prevalence of climate havoc throughout 21st-century fiction. Authors to be read include Ted Chiang, Charles Yu, Octavia Butler, Charlie Jane Anders, Marc-Uwe Kling, Colson Whitehead, Paolo Bacigalupi.  We’ll also look at some film and television narratives (Black Mirror episodes; Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival). UK Core: Arts & Creativity
ENG 130 003  LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Badass Female Characters
Kimaya Thakur
MWF 2:00

Predominantly, the lead female characters are either “princesses” or “evil stepmothers” (like Cinderella, and her stepmother). This course departs from such typical characters and instead surveys various “Badass Female Characters,” that is, those female protagonists who are strong, independent, assertive, unconventional, intimidating – those girls, those women, who do whatever it takes to make an impact and effect some change. The course will include those readings which help students grasp the scope of “badass female” – the manifold ways female characters demonstrate strength, willpower, agency. As such, students will study badass female characters from mythology, folktales, famous fictions, and even reality. Readings will include novels, biographies, short stories and poems, and an occasional film or two. Some assigned readings will be Madeline Miller’s Circe, Margot Lee Shetterly’s Hidden Figures, and Angeline Boulley’s Firekeeper’s DaughterUK Core: Arts & Creativity
ENG 130 004  LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Badass Female Characters
Kimaya Thakur
MWF 1:00

Predominantly, the lead female characters are either “princesses” or “evil stepmothers” (like Cinderella, and her stepmother). This course departs from such typical characters and instead surveys various “Badass Female Characters,” that is, those female protagonists who are strong, independent, assertive, unconventional, intimidating – those girls, those women, who do whatever it takes to make an impact and effect some change. The course will include those readings which help students grasp the scope of “badass female” – the manifold ways female characters demonstrate strength, willpower, agency. As such, students will study badass female characters from mythology, folktales, famous fictions, and even reality. Readings will include novels, biographies, short stories and poems, and an occasional film or two. Some assigned readings will be Madeline Miller’s Circe, Margot Lee Shetterly’s Hidden Figures, and Angeline Boulley’s Firekeeper’s DaughterUK Core: Arts & Creativity
ENG 180 001 GREAT MOVIES: Psychological Horror/Thriller
Kevin Bond
MWF 9:00

Psychological horror (PH) is a subgenre of horror with a particular focus on mental, emotional, and psychological states. While a typical horror story emphasizes external conflict—a monster, chainsaw murderer, or paranormal entity acting as antagonist—PH tends to focus on the main character's inner conflict and the terror that arises from attacks on the ego. Such films typically incorporate staples like paranoia, lies, and flawed memories—elements that put the audience’s grasp of the narrative to the test just as characters themselves doubt their own perceptions of reality and question their sanity. This introductory course will explore the terminology, technique, and effects of cinema, using PH/thrillers as our lens. We will focus on the choices made by filmmakers in terms of technique, narrative, and style, ultimately setting our sights on how these interact to create a complex sense of meaning. We will also reflect on what accounts for the complex, rich, and dynamic attraction to horror. We will ask: What drives us to watch scary movies? Why is this focus on the darker side of the human psyche that’s often repressed a worthy pursuit for filmmakers? What capabilities of movies make them an effective medium for depicting narratives that unfold like vivid nightmares? Given the disturbing nature of PH/thrillers, most of the films we will watch and discuss will portray content that may be difficult viewing for some. Students should expect to encounter depictions of intense or persistent violence, emotional trauma, and images evoking terror. Regular participation in class discussion will be expected. Students will also be required to submit informal responses to the films on a weekly basis, write critical reviews, and develop creative artifacts related to the themes discussed in class. UK Core: Arts & Creativity
ENG 180 002 GREAT MOVIES: Movies We Love
Matthew Godbey
TR 9:30

If the pandemic taught us anything, it’s the importance of movies to American culture. For many of us, stuck at home, they offered (and continue to offer) an escape from daily life. This semester, we’ll work to better understand the movies we watch by focusing on our relationship to the stories they tell. This course is designed to answer two simple questions: What are the kinds of movies we love to watch over and over and why do we keep coming back? Whether we’re talking about time loop movies where each day feels the same, or romantic comedies where love triumphs over everything, there are certain storylines audiences can’t get enough of. Over the course of the semester, we’ll examine some of these storylines and work to understand their basic structures. In particular, we’ll examine the cultural archetypes and myths on which they’re built and use these discussions as springboards for critical analysis and for your own creative productions. UK Core: Arts & Creativity
ENG 180 003 GREAT MOVIES: Science Fiction
Frederick Bengtsson
MWF 11:00

Science fiction films have been around since the beginning of cinema. Filmmakers have transported us to the moon and taken us on space odysseys, have shown us futures both utopian and dystopian, have celebrated the possibilities of science and worried about its risks, have stretched the bounds of the imagination and pushed the possibilities of film and filmmaking. Along the way, we've had close encounters with aliens, robots, artificial intelligences—but also with ourselves. In this course we will engage with a variety of science fiction films, thinking about how and why they tell their stories; about what is at stake in their representations of the future, of technology, of the alien; and about the creation, representation, and perhaps even the meanings of the worlds imagined in them. UK Core: Arts & Creativity
ENG 180 004 GREAT MOVIES: Science Fiction
Frederick Bengtsson
MWF 12:00

Science fiction films have been around since the beginning of cinema. Filmmakers have transported us to the moon and taken us on space odysseys, have shown us futures both utopian and dystopian, have celebrated the possibilities of science and worried about its risks, have stretched the bounds of the imagination and pushed the possibilities of film and filmmaking. Along the way, we've had close encounters with aliens, robots, artificial intelligences—but also with ourselves. In this course we will engage with a variety of science fiction films, thinking about how and why they tell their stories; about what is at stake in their representations of the future, of technology, of the alien; and about the creation, representation, and perhaps even the meanings of the worlds imagined in them. UK Core: Arts & Creativity 

ENG 180 201 GREAT MOVIES: The Hitchcock Thriller
WC Foreman
MWF 10:00 ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS
 
This course will examine "the Hitchcock Thriller," looking at (probably) thirteen movies directed by Alfred Hitchcock (1899-1980).  The Hitchcock Thriller: always there is suspense and always an interest in manipulating his audience's reactions: arousing and releasing our anxieties, expectations, and fears as we follow his characters through dangerous situations that may involve threatened innocence, unexpected adventure, espionage, romance, and excursions into the dark sides of human nature.  But also there is usually humor.  Most of Hitchcock's movies (and all of the movies in this course) enmesh innocent persons unexpectedly in perilous situations and watch how (and if?) they can extricate themselves (or be extricated).  The movies also examine the very nature of "innocence" and its relation to guilt.  And we should ask: since these movies are so enjoyable, what is it that makes danger funUK Core: Arts & Creativity
ENG 207 001 BEG WKSP IMAG WRIT: Fiction
Kevin Bond
MWF 10:00

ENG 207 is a beginning course focusing on the art and craft of the short story. In this course, students will learn the building blocks of fiction through the exploration of core craft elements, as well as through the careful study of stories by professional writers. Our primary goal is to learn how to read works of fiction critically and how to develop our own works through the revision process. Students will compose their own works of fiction, trying out shorter forms like flash fiction and microfiction, in addition to longer fully realized short stories. This class follows the workshop model, so students should expect to have their work discussed and critiqued by the class in both small and large groups. Regular participation in class discussion about readings and our own creative works is expected.
ENG 207 002 BEG WKSP IMAG WRIT: Fiction
Allegra Solomon
TR 9:30
 
In this class we will be focusing on craft in fiction writing—studying various short stories while writing and workshopping short fiction of our own! The goal for this class is to introduce students to the experience of “the workshop” while also helping them grow as writers and critical thinkers. Students will have the chance to write short stories of their own, revise them with the help of their class, and submit a story of their choice by the end of the semester.
ENG 207 003 BEG WKSP IMAG WRIT: Poetry
Julia Johnson
TR 11:00
 
A beginning workshop in the craft of writing, teaching students how to read critically and how to revise work in progress. The students provide an audience for each others' work. Exercises involve practice in aspects of craft and promote experimentation with different forms, subjects, and approaches; outside reading provides models and inspiration. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Required for ENG Creative Writing Option.
ENG 207 004 BEG WKSP IMAG WRIT: Autobiography
Gurney Norman
TR 3:30

The premise of this course in autobiographical writing is that every person has stories to tell about her or his experiences of life. It is assumed that each member of the class is self-motivated to write his or her individual life-stories. Many will want to write their stories from deep personal need as part of their journey of self-discovery. Others will be more interested in making a record of their lives, for future use by family members. Perhaps the writer will simply want to express long-held feelings, emotions, memories, facts, secrets. Regardless of motive, the basic task for each student writer is to produce pages of writing each week. As the final project of the semester, students will assemble the written pages in manuscript form according to professional standards. The instructor’s task is to respond to the work of each individual writer through written comments and during the class meetings. The instructor will offer prompts for short in-class and out-of-class writing exercises. Students are invited to take turns reading aloud passages of their writing to the assembled class members. 
ENG 230 001 INTRO TO LIT: Love
Matthew Wentz
MWF 2:00

What types of love exist—familial, platonic, romantic, sexual, self, etc.? What do we do when we are in love, or for those whom we love? Do we only love people? Does love help us do good things, become better people—or, perhaps, even make us do bad things? What is love? This course will look at some of the ways authors/artists have, at very different times and places, represented love in a range of media. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 230 002 INTRO TO LIT: Love
Matthew Wentz
MWF 1:00

What types of love exist—familial, platonic, romantic, sexual, self, etc.? What do we do when we are in love, or for those whom we love? Do we only love people? Does love help us do good things, become better people—or, perhaps, even make us do bad things? What is love? This course will look at some of the ways authors/artists have, at very different times and places, represented love in a range of media. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 230 003 INTRO TO LIT: Modern Irish Literature
Jonathan Allison
TR 9:30

A course on Irish literature and culture, focusing on modern fiction, poetry, folklore, drama, music, and the visual arts in relation to cultural and political backgrounds. Topics to be explored include history, identity, sexuality and gender. Authors include W.B. Yeats, Oscar Wilde, Lady Gregory, James Joyce, Frank O’Connor and postwar authors such as Edna O’Brien, Nuala O’Faolain, Seamus Heaney, Paul Muldoon and Eavan Boland. The course will include a section on Irish cinema and modern Irish painting. Finally, we will explore the significance of Ireland in the American imagination, and cultural relations between Britain, Ireland, and the USA. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 241 001 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I
Frederick Bengtsson
MWF 10:00

English 241 is a survey of British (not just “English”) literature from its earliest beginnings through the end of the sixteenth century. Obviously, we will not be able to cover all literary developments in a period of more than a thousand years in great depth. Instead, the course will have four major goals: To give students a sense of the development of major modes of writing in English in this long period and of changes in the English language itself; To provide an account of the connections between the texts we read and the British history that produced them; To help students build a critical vocabulary for discussing and analyzing literature; To acquaint students with some of the most important research tools for studying pre-modern literature
ENG 242 001 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE II
Michael Genovese
MWF 11:00

A survey of British literature from the seventeenth century to the present, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the later English literary tradition. Authors covered may include the Augustan poetry of John Dryden and Alexander Pope; the early and later Romantic movements; novelists and poets of the Victorian period such as Charles Dickens, Alfred Tennyson, and Elizabeth B. Browning; the early twentieth-century Modernism of Virginia Woolf and T.S. Eliot; and more. Lecture or lecture with discussion. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
ENG 252 001 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II 
Matthew Godbey
TR 11:00

Eng. 252 is a chronological survey of American literature from the Civil War to present day. Beginning with the literature of realism and naturalism that developed in the latter half of the 19th century and concluding with a variety of contemporary writers and forms, we’ll examine the intersection between American history and American literature. We’ll do so by reading and studying works of poetry and fiction from a range of men and women of diverse backgrounds and interests.  As we study the myriad voices that constitute American literature, we will address questions such as: How do gender, race, and class affect the creation and reception of a literary text? How do writers help define and interrogate the notion of an “American” identity?  What role has literature played in the ongoing story of the culture and history of the United States?  How are the broad cultural movements of realism, naturalism, modernism, and postmodernism reflected in literary works and how do those movements shape the writing and reception of literature? What is the place of literature in the United States in the 21st century? 
ENG 260 201 INTRODUCTION TO BLACK WRITERS
Nazera Wright
ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS

This course traces representations of black girlhood in early African American print and visual sources in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a span of time that ranges from the early decades of the new republic to the eve of the New Negro Renaissance. During this period, black writers used black girls as tools to advance their social and political agendas. Often these agendas touched upon national issues of concern to the black community, such as safety and survival during the decades when the Fugitive Slave Act was in effect, strategies for achieving full citizenship rights, working for the abolition of slavery, finding work in the post-Civil War industrialized North, and crafting strategies for educating the next generation. Just as often, black writers relied upon black girls as emblems of home and family. Whatever platform they chose for their writing, the black girls they wrote about carried stories of warning and hope, concern and optimism, struggles and success. This course will examine how early black writers had important messages to convey to black girls. Some writers wanted to control them. Others sought to empower them. All of them saw their potential power. We will explore important critical essays and examine major authors, themes, traditions, conventions, and tropes to help us discuss and evaluate early representations of black girlhood. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 260 202 INTRODUCTION TO BLACK WRITERS
Nazera Wright
ONLINE ASYNCHRONOUS

This course traces representations of black girlhood in early African American print and visual sources in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a span of time that ranges from the early decades of the new republic to the eve of the New Negro Renaissance. During this period, black writers used black girls as tools to advance their social and political agendas. Often these agendas touched upon national issues of concern to the black community, such as safety and survival during the decades when the Fugitive Slave Act was in effect, strategies for achieving full citizenship rights, working for the abolition of slavery, finding work in the post-Civil War industrialized North, and crafting strategies for educating the next generation. Just as often, black writers relied upon black girls as emblems of home and family. Whatever platform they chose for their writing, the black girls they wrote about carried stories of warning and hope, concern and optimism, struggles and success. This course will examine how early black writers had important messages to convey to black girls. Some writers wanted to control them. Others sought to empower them. All of them saw their potential power. We will explore important critical essays and examine major authors, themes, traditions, conventions, and tropes to help us discuss and evaluate early representations of black girlhood. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 266 001 SURVEY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE II
Shauna Morgan
TR 9:30

Designed as an introductory survey of texts and discourses within the African American literary tradition, this course will focus on literature from the post-Reconstruction era until the present, including Black musical traditions, the Harlem Renaissance, and cultural productions of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements.  As we explore selected genres, periods, and thematic characteristics of the later African American cultural and literary experience through close textual readings and analyses, we will also investigate how these works reveal and respond to socio-cultural ideologies that shape formations of identity and notions of self. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit. 
ENG 280 001 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Brandon West
TR 9:30

This section of ENG 280 is a survey of film studies, intended to provide a broad overview of the academic study of cinema. As such, the course covers a large variety of topics, ranging from camera movements to editing to sound design to the more abstract concept of cinema as culture. As befitting this array of disparate subjects, the course likewise examines a variety of different films from various genres and contexts. Likely films include Get Out (2017), No Country for Old Men (2007), and Shin Godzilla (2016). Assessments may include mid-term and final exams, short papers, film quizzes, and in-class presentations. There is no assigned textbook for this course. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 280 002 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Brandon West
TR 11:00

This section of ENG 280 is a survey of film studies, intended to provide a broad overview of the academic study of cinema. As such, the course covers a large variety of topics, ranging from camera movements to editing to sound design to the more abstract concept of cinema as culture. As befitting this array of disparate subjects, the course likewise examines a variety of different films from various genres and contexts. Likely films include Get Out (2017), No Country for Old Men (2007), and Shin Godzilla (2016). Assessments may include mid-term and final exams, short papers, film quizzes, and in-class presentations. There is no assigned textbook for this course. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 280 003 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Rick Halkyard
MWF 2:00

Film and literature are two drastically differing, yet creative mediums which have been used to examine, commentate upon, and illustrate war as an extremity of the human experience and brokenness. This course will introduce how these creative discourses “speak” to one another as they attempt to “speak” to us as viewers and readers. We will view war films spanning from the Civil War to the U.S. incursion on Iraq while reading corresponding literary war fiction across multiple formats (e.g., novels, short stories, poetry). In so doing, we will address the work of filmmakers like Spielberg, Zemeckis, and Bigelow, as well as canonical authors including Melville, Crane, Hemingway, and others. While carefully noting the array of means by which these artists approach warfare (i.e., literary aesthetic, film-editing, cinematography, mise-en-scène, etc.), we will wrestle with the elemental questions every author seems to ask, and filmmakers attempt to capture: what is the meaning of war? what is an “ideal” soldier? how does the trauma of war “travel” from the battlefield to home? how do we think of terms like “duty,” “honor,” and “war death?” The course assessment includes several short “Hot Spot” papers, group discussion, and a final paper. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 280 004 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Rick Halkyard
MWF 1:00

Film and literature are two drastically differing, yet creative mediums which have been used to examine, commentate upon, and illustrate war as an extremity of the human experience and brokenness. This course will introduce how these creative discourses “speak” to one another as they attempt to “speak” to us as viewers and readers. We will view war films spanning from the Civil War to the U.S. incursion on Iraq while reading corresponding literary war fiction across multiple formats (e.g., novels, short stories, poetry). In so doing, we will address the work of filmmakers like Spielberg, Zemeckis, and Bigelow, as well as canonical authors including Melville, Crane, Hemingway, and others. While carefully noting the array of means by which these artists approach warfare (i.e., literary aesthetic, film-editing, cinematography, mise-en-scène, etc.), we will wrestle with the elemental questions every author seems to ask, and filmmakers attempt to capture: what is the meaning of war? what is an “ideal” soldier? how does the trauma of war “travel” from the battlefield to home? how do we think of terms like “duty,” “honor,” and “war death?” The course assessment includes several short “Hot Spot” papers, group discussion, and a final paper. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 280 005 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Amanda Salmon
MWF 11:00

This course is an introduction to film in two senses: to the wild array of possibilities of the medium and to the careful study of these possibilities. We will watch films as unlike each other as possible, in a range of formats (celluloid, digital), modes (fiction, documentary, animation), intended audience (mainstream, niche), and national origin. Coherence will be provided by careful attention to the technique and form of cinema (mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, sound) as well as the conditions of spectatorship. The question that has occupied critics, scholars, and theorists for decades — what is cinema? — will guide us throughout the semester. Assessments will involve weekly quizzes, formal written responses, and an analysis of a film of your choice to be published for a public, non-academic audience on a class Web site. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 280 006 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Amanda Salmon
MWF 10:00

This course is an introduction to film in two senses: to the wild array of possibilities of the medium and to the careful study of these possibilities. We will watch films as unlike each other as possible, in a range of formats (celluloid, digital), modes (fiction, documentary, animation), intended audience (mainstream, niche), and national origin. Coherence will be provided by careful attention to the technique and form of cinema (mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, sound) as well as the conditions of spectatorship. The question that has occupied critics, scholars, and theorists for decades — what is cinema? — will guide us throughout the semester. Assessments will involve weekly quizzes, formal written responses, and an analysis of a film of your choice to be published for a public, non-academic audience on a class Web site. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 280 007 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Jenn Murray
TR 12:30

How do we remember and commemorate violence?  How reliable is the memory we share and pass on to others? This course will attempt to grapple with these questions and more as we consider a number of films representing conflict and how these films engage our course themes of Conflict, Memory, and Representation. At its heart, this is a basic introduction to the study of film. We will learn to analyze mise-en-scène, editing, cinematography, sound, film genres, and narrative structure. In addition to the textbook study of formal elements of film and film-making indicated above, this class will require students to view approximately one film per week outside of class and participate in large and small group discussions that move beyond the plot of the film and into a consideration of its form and the ways in which the film manufactures, represents, manipulates, interrogates and creates cultural memories of conflicts and contempt among peoples. Graded work in the course will include written critical and analytical responses of varying lengths, quizzes and exams, and a final short film pitch. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 280 008 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Jenn Murray
TR 11:00

How do we remember and commemorate violence?  How reliable is the memory we share and pass on to others? This course will attempt to grapple with these questions and more as we consider a number of films representing conflict and how these films engage our course themes of Conflict, Memory, and Representation. At its heart, this is a basic introduction to the study of film. We will learn to analyze mise-en-scène, editing, cinematography, sound, film genres, and narrative structure. In addition to the textbook study of formal elements of film and film-making indicated above, this class will require students to view approximately one film per week outside of class and participate in large and small group discussions that move beyond the plot of the film and into a consideration of its form and the ways in which the film manufactures, represents, manipulates, interrogates and creates cultural memories of conflicts and contempt among peoples. Graded work in the course will include written critical and analytical responses of varying lengths, quizzes and exams, and a final short film pitch. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 280 201 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Zach Griffith
MWF 11:00 ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS

Today, we’re surrounded by visions of the past and the future. In the last decade or so, we’ve seen an onslaught of nostalgic media in American culture in shows like Stranger Things and films like Ready Player One, as well as a renewed interest in narratives about previously under-discussed historical events and figures, seen in works like Hamilton and The Trial of the Chicago 7. At the same time, we’ve also seen a number of massively popular works that speculate about the future, from dystopian narratives like The Hunger Games trilogy and The Handmaid’s Tale, to supernatural/sci-fi stories such as The Walking Dead and Black Mirror. In short, there’s considerable public interest in stories that are set in other times, and American culture is filled with narratives about who we were and what we might become. This raises a simple question: why? What drives our obsession with the styles and experiences of bygone eras? Why do we tell stories about what the future might hold? How do we remember the past, and how does that memory shape our present (and our future)? How does the present shape the way we conceive of the past and the future? This course will investigate these questions through a selection of films in an effort to consider why we turn to the past and the future, and what these desires tell us about the present. In doing so, the course will introduce students to the basics of film, interpretation, and argument, and we will produce work in written, oral, and digital forms. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities
ENG 280 202 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
Zach Griffith
MWF 11:00 ONLINE SYNCHRONOUS

Today, we’re surrounded by visions of the past and the future. In the last decade or so, we’ve seen an onslaught of nostalgic media in American culture in shows like Stranger Things and films like Ready Player One, as well as a renewed interest in narratives about previously under-discussed historical events and figures, seen in works like Hamilton and The Trial of the Chicago 7. At the same time, we’ve also seen a number of massively popular works that speculate about the future, from dystopian narratives like The Hunger Games trilogy and The Handmaid’s Tale, to supernatural/sci-fi stories such as The Walking Dead and Black Mirror. In short, there’s considerable public interest in stories that are set in other times, and American culture is filled with narratives about who we were and what we might become. This raises a simple question: why? What drives our obsession with the styles and experiences of bygone eras? Why do we tell stories about what the future might hold? How do we remember the past, and how does that memory shape our present (and our future)? How does the present shape the way we conceive of the past and the future? This course will investigate these questions through a selection of films in an effort to consider why we turn to the past and the future, and what these desires tell us about the present. In doing so, the course will introduce students to the basics of film, interpretation, and argument, and we will produce work in written, oral, and digital forms. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities
ENG 290 001 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S LITERATURE
Katie McClain
TR 9:30

A new storyteller can create an entirely different story, just as a retelling can become even more powerful than an original version. The American women storytellers discussed in this course tell such powerful, reconfigured stories in order to rewrite assumptions about American culture. During this semester, we will explore familiar American narratives from various perspectives – in particular American women from the 19th century to the present – to better understand how important the power of “retelling” can truly be. Through these diverse narratives, we will consider questions of gender, race, class, sexuality, and national identity in the United States; we will examine such contexts via novels, short stories, film, nonfiction, poetry, drama, and graphic novels. Students will complete written analysis on historical and cultural contexts, produce presentations on texts by American women writers, and create a final group digital project. Content will include writing from authors such as Octavia Butler, Alison Bechdel, and Joy Harjo, as well as films by directors such as Greta Gerwig and Ava DuVernay. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 290 001 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S LITERATURE
Katie McClain
TR 12:30

A new storyteller can create an entirely different story, just as a retelling can become even more powerful than an original version. The American women storytellers discussed in this course tell such powerful, reconfigured stories in order to rewrite assumptions about American culture. During this semester, we will explore familiar American narratives from various perspectives – in particular American women from the 19th century to the present – to better understand how important the power of “retelling” can truly be. Through these diverse narratives, we will consider questions of gender, race, class, sexuality, and national identity in the United States; we will examine such contexts via novels, short stories, film, nonfiction, poetry, drama, and graphic novels. Students will complete written analysis on historical and cultural contexts, produce presentations on texts by American women writers, and create a final group digital project. Content will include writing from authors such as Octavia Butler, Alison Bechdel, and Joy Harjo, as well as films by directors such as Greta Gerwig and Ava DuVernay. UK Core: Intellectual Inquiry in the  Humanities
ENG 307 001 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING: Art of the Sentence
Hannah Pittard
TR 3:30

Here’s our likely reading list: A Lie Somebody Told You About Yourself by Peter Ho Davies, The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones, My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite, What Are You Going Through by Sigrid Nunez, and Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney. This is a course on structure and form. This is not a course on theory. Participation and discussion are critical components of the class. Additionally, there will be weekly writing assignments, and the course will culminate in student presentations wherein participants will have an opportunity to display the skills they’ve acquired over the semester.
ENG 330 001 TEXT AND CONTEXT: Hamlet
Emily Shortslef
MW 3:00

Few texts have had afterlives as long and rich as Shakespeare’s Hamlet. In this course we’ll explore some of Hamlet’s many reappearances in literary criticism, philosophy, theatre, and film. We’ll also look at some of the primary sources that Shakespeare drew on to create the play and discuss its relationship to various late sixteenth-century religious and socio-political contexts. We’ll also read a few other plays from the same period that take up similar issues (e.g. Kyd’s Spanish Tragedy, Middleton’s Revenger’s Tragedy). Topics of discussion and research include memory, mourning, ghosts, and revenge. This course will introduce students to Shakespeare’s work in its historical and dramatic contexts; foster the development of a critical vocabulary and set of strategies for analyzing complex texts; and help students to develop close reading and critical writing skills.
ENG 330 002 TEXT AND CONTEXT: The Great Gatsby
Jeff Clymer
TR 2:00

This section of “Text and Context” is centered around the iconic American novel, The Great Gatsby. Almost everyone has read it at some point, but it is a text that infinitely rewards deep and further consideration. We will focus on The Great Gatsby from a number of angles, or contexts, from the 1920s, including: literary modernism and expatriatism; American nativism; business culture; gangster culture; changing gender and sexual roles; the increasing wealth gap; race and passing; and, of course, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s own life and biography. In addition to Gatsby, the reading list is likely to include Fitzgerald’s The Beautiful and Damned as well some of his short stories, Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence, Sinclair Lewis’s Babbitt, Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, Dashiell Hammett’s Red Dawn, and Nella Larsen’s Passing.  We will also pay attention to the material culture of the 1920s, including movies (such as Rudolph Valentino’s The Sheik), music, art, and the changing demographics of the United States. 
ENG 330 003 TEXT AND CONTEXT: Literature in Victorian London
Jill Rappoport
TR 12:30

For the 19th-century authors this course examines, London was a place of contradictions. Center of a wealthy and expanding empire, it was also a site of filth, poverty, and crime. The city offered opportunity but also danger to its visitors and inhabitants; it was a showcase of both civic reform and social scandal. Despite tremendous growth in population, the urban experience was frequently one of isolation and alienation. In this course, we will explore the possibilities that Victorian London provided for the literary imagination. How did urban space shape, conceal, or reveal character? How did the different perspectives of tourist, detective, reformer, prostitute, or child help to construct popular ideas about London? What literary genres emerged out of the changing conditions of the city? We will read poetry, fiction, and essays, mapping various literary and social projects within the rapidly changing spaces of an increasingly modern city. The course has two primary aims: to introduce you to a range of key nineteenth-century authors and literary forms through close, critical reading, and to provoke your thoughtful assessment of the relationships between these texts and their cultural contexts.
ENG 330 004 TEXT AND CONTEXT: Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko
Joyce MacDonald
MWF 11:00

This section of English 330 will focus on Aphra Behn’s extraordinary short fiction Oroonoko. First published in 1688, its main characters are two enslaved black lovers willing to fight and die for their freedom, in settings ranging from a richly imagined African court to the jungles of the new world. Behn’s heroine, Imoinda, is one of the very few major black female characters of the early modern period, and her story inspired a raft of imitations in the years after its first appearance. After an opening look at Behn’s career as the first Englishwoman to make a living as a professional writer, students will read Oroonoko and a selection of some of the works it inspired, concentrating on their evolving treatments of race, slavery, and the characters of Oroonoko and Imoinda.
ENG 337 001 LITERATURE AND GENRE: Greatest Novels in English
Peter J. Kalliney
TR 9:30

In this study of the novel in English, we'll read some of the finest examples of the genre.  How did the novel develop and evolve over time?  Why did long-format fiction, once a marginal part of the literary world, become so popular?  Did the English-language novel change when it became a global form, written and read all over the world?  Studying some of the greatest novels in the language will help us learn the special techniques of narrative fiction, including how fiction develops characters, how writers establish narrative voice, how fiction depicts the relationship between individuals and groups, and how writers play with language.  Featured texts are likely to include Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse, Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, and Sam Selvon's The Lonely Londoners.  Class meetings will be discussion-based.
ENG 338 001 TOPICS IN LITERATURE: Law & Literature
Jeff Clymer
TR 12:30

We often think of the law as separate from our day-to-day lives, as more like an objective arena to which disputes are brought and adjudicated. Yet the law’s presence—through norms, practices, and representation—does much to shape our everyday identities, desires, and social possibilities. Similar to literary works, laws and judicial decisions also hinge on language and interpretation.  Both legal and literary works use language to create our world, even as law has the power of coercion and literature has the power of imagined alternatives. In this class, we will read several (mostly) American literary works that thematize key legal issues in US history that remain significant today. We will also become familiar with theories of reading, representation, and interpretation that underpin both literary and legal analysis. This course is certainly appropriate for students contemplating law school, but it is equally accessible and interesting for students who simply have an interest in the way literary works deal with complex social issues.  Reading list will likely include Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter), Mark Twain (Pudd’nhead Wilson), Henry James (The Aspern Papers), Harper Lee (To Kill a Mockingbird), Ian McEwen (The Children Act), Colson Whitehead (The Nickle Boys), and Julie Otsuka (When the Emperor was Divine), as well as legal theorists such as Stanley Fish, Rosemary Coombe, Patricia Williams, Cheryl Harris, and Neil Gotanda. 
ENG 341 CHAUCER AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES
Matthew Giancarlo
MWF 1:00

A course covering medieval English literature from around the years 1350-1450 and centering on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1340-1400), particularly his early dream-visions and The Canterbury Tales. Other authors and texts may include William Langland's Piers Plowman; the poetry of John Gower; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and the works of the Pearl-Poet; Thomas Hoccleve; Margery Kempe; anonymous romances and Arthurian narratives; and more. Topics include courtly love and chivalry; Christian spirituality; women and gender roles; feudal politics and rebellion. Open to students from any major. Fulfills the ENG Early Period requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
ENG 369 001 AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN'S WRITING 
Regina Hamilton
TR 2:00

This course is primarily concerned with the writing of Black women writers throughout the twentieth century. We will cover fictional works by Harriet Wilson, Pauline Hopkins, Nella Larsen, Alice Walker, Octavia Butler, and others. Contextualizing our discussion of these texts, we will also be engaging critical texts written by black women. In this course, we will examine topics such as the intersection of race and gender, genre and its limitations, black feminist theory, and writing as a revolutionary act.
ENG 380 001 FILM AND GENRE: 21c American War Films
Alan Nadel
MW 2:00

This course exams two genres of American war film that have emerged in the 21st Century. The first genre examines films that negotiate war that continues after the declaration that its “mission” was “accomplished,” such as, Jarhead, The Hurt Locker, Redacted, The Green Zone, and American Sniper; the second looks at films for which the only mission is to “get out.” These include: 13 Hours, Hacksaw Ridge, and Dunkirk. We will also look at the cultural narratives informing these films, as reflected in other films, such as, Get Out, Us, Deepwater Horizon, Sully, and Captain Phillips. There will be short quizzes, three take-home exams, and a final.
ENG 382 001 HISTORY OF FILM II
Jordan Brower
MW 5:00

This course explores the history of film from 1945 to 2000—between World War II and the new millennium—emphasizing transformations in American filmmaking alongside landmark instances of international art cinemas. In addition to closely analyzing movies by notable directors, we will consider changes in film production and exhibition, the development of film technology as well as the emergence of new forms of audiovisual entertainment, and the ways that movies emerge from and respond to changing social, cultural, and political conditions. Likely films include Bicycle Thieves, In a Lonely Place, Rebel Without a Cause, Bonnie and Clyde, Breathless, Do the Right Thing, Pulp Fiction, and In the Mood for Love. Assessment will likely take the form of informal responses, a close analysis essay (~1200-1500 words), a midterm, and a final exam. 
 
ENG 407 001 INTERM WKSP CTV WRIT:  Memory Stories
Gurney Norman
R 5:00

This class in Memory Stories invites students to write personal stories they have long held in mind and recently recovered from memory. The premise of our course is that we are self-motivated to do this kind of personal writing. It is possible that such writing will be appreciated by family members beyond one’s own present generation. Most contemporary families appreciate evidence of the thoughts and feelings and stories of their fellow family members. Others may want to write about personal experiences that they don’t wish to share with others. Communities also have memory, especially of notable events and experiences. To a large extent, community itself is founded on shared memories. Writers are individuals who feel called to record their own, their family's, and their community’s collective experiences. The basic task for each student writer is to produce pages of writing each week. As the final project of the semester, students will assemble the written pages in manuscript form according to professional standards. The instructor’s task is to respond to the work of each individual writer through written comments and during the class meetings. The instructor will offer prompts for short in-class and out-of-class writing exercises. Students are invited to take turns reading aloud passages of their writing to the assembled class members. 
ENG 407 002 INTERM WKSP CTV WRIT: Obstructions in Poetry
Julia Johnson
TR 12:30

We meet twice a week for an extended meeting of poets. We will leave our comfort zones. This class is devoted to poetry by you and by others. It is a workshop-based class. We will together access and read an extensive amount of work by contemporary poets, with a particular focus on international poetry. The class is a casual operation, largely student driven. What you don’t ask, formulate, present, question, interrogate, assert, or wonder aloud, etc. will remain forever in the empty cavern of your heart.
ENG 425 001 ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING
Michael Carter
TR 11:00

Fiction, non-fiction, poetry and many other artistic genres have taken us to task in our treatment of the environment we humans share with all life. Whether James Fenimore Cooper in The Pioneers showing the destruction in the town of Templeton of a flock of passenger pigeons to the disgust of Natty Bumppo, or John Muir telling about the grandeur of CA’s mountains (seeing it as nature untouched, not realizing the millennia of Indigenous Peoples who had “tended” their natural world), or Annie Dillard watching frogs leaping toward water, humans have admired “nature” often as an object --  not as part of the living organism that is our planet. This course will both examine nature as amazing life but more explicitly examine our effects on that life: animal and plant. We have always had voices countering these behaviors. We will read from a variety of environmental writers from 19th century’s Thoreau to 20th century’s Bill McKibben and Wendell Berry to Linda Hogan and other Native American voices that to this day confront the abasement of the environment whether of a wall being built through sensitive landscapes and habitats or of a pipeline moving oil sludge through sacred waterways and hills. As well as reading and researching, we will write, following our minds and eyes to a better understanding of humans’ effect on the natural world through their construction, extraction, and other actions to build “civilization.” 
ENG 425 001 ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING
Michael Carter
TR 12:30

Fiction, non-fiction, poetry and many other artistic genres have taken us to task in our treatment of the environment we humans share with all life. Whether James Fenimore Cooper in The Pioneers showing the destruction in the town of Templeton of a flock of passenger pigeons to the disgust of Natty Bumppo, or John Muir telling about the grandeur of CA’s mountains (seeing it as nature untouched, not realizing the millennia of Indigenous Peoples who had “tended” their natural world), or Annie Dillard watching frogs leaping toward water, humans have admired “nature” often as an object --  not as part of the living organism that is our planet. This course will both examine nature as amazing life but more explicitly examine our effects on that life: animal and plant. We have always had voices countering these behaviors. We will read from a variety of environmental writers from 19th century’s Thoreau to 20th century’s Bill McKibben and Wendell Berry to Linda Hogan and other Native American voices that to this day confront the abasement of the environment whether of a wall being built through sensitive landscapes and habitats or of a pipeline moving oil sludge through sacred waterways and hills. As well as reading and researching, we will write, following our minds and eyes to a better understanding of humans’ effect on the natural world through their construction, extraction, and other actions to build “civilization.” 
ENG 440G 001 STUDIES IN BRITISH LIT: The New World
Joyce MacDonald
MWF 12:00

Beginning with More’s Utopia, this section of English 440 will concentrate on Renaissance writings about the Americas. Sometimes factual, sometimes fictional, these writings—plays, poems, diaries, and more—helped formulate English ideas about a part of the world that most English people would never see, despite the fact that Britain’s American colonies would come to generate vast imperial wealth. We will pay especial attention to how our writers often had to rely on existing literary ancient forms—epic, ode, georgic—to write about the quite new experiences and challenges that settling the Americas presented. How did fact and fiction mix in writings about North America, and why? What did the writings we’ll study tell Britons about the Americas, the people who lived there, and the process of establishing British colonies across the Atlantic?
ENG 460G 001 STUDIES IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE: Black Futures
Regina Hamilton
TR 3:30

In this course we will be using the oeuvre of Octavia Butler to interrogate the speculative and often dystopian elements of black futures in contemporary African American literature. For all of us, questions about the future of humanity abound. What will be the future of Blackness, gender, or sexuality? What will be the future of human beings as a species on a planet we seem hellbent on  destroying? In the universes of Butler’s texts, there are many different answers, and with the space of a few decades, perhaps we are more primed than ever to accept and/or interrogate the answers as well as the questions we find in Butler’s work. In this course, we will take a Black feminist approach to Butler’s literature by also engaging theoretical texts from Alys Eve Weinbaum, Hortense Spillers, Saidiyah Hartman, Sylvia Wynter, and others.
ENG 480 001 STUDIES IN FILM: The Hollywood Western and the Ride into the Sunset
Armando Prats
TR 12:30

This course examines the endings of American Westerns (including the Spaghetti Westerns of Sergio Leone) in the context of that old promise—often implicit yet ever alluring—that sustains the hero’s actions, his sacrifices, on behalf of a myth, a delusion. We will screen some fifteen or so Westerns and focus our attention not only on plot and character but on the relation between myth and history. An oral presentation that will form the basis of a final research paper. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
ENG 495 001 HONORS SEMINAR: Film, Literature, and Culture of Cold War America (1946 to 1963)
Alan Nadel
MW 2:00

This honors seminar will look at the informing concepts and practices of American politics and culture during the “High” Cold War (i.e., between the end of WWII and the escalation of the Vietnam War), as manifest in the literature, film, court decisions, and public policies of the period. The topics will include: “McCarthyism,” desegregation, and the post-WWII reassignment of gender roles.  Texts will include the novels The Catcher in the Rye, Lolita, Invisible Man, and the films No Way Out, The Defiant Ones, Gigi, Lady and the Tramp, Rear Window, and In a Lonely Place. There will be two take-home exams and a research paper (2500 to 3500 words).
ENG 507 001 ADV WKSHP IMAG WRTNG: Short Stories
Hannah Pittard
TR 2:00

This is a generative workshop. Students should come prepared to write NEW material. We will workshop only short stories. Partial novels should not be turned in, nor should writing done prior to the start of this course. Additionally, students will write weekly peer critiques. Prerequisites required for enrollment.
ENG 507 002 ADV WKSHP IMAG WRTNG: Obstructions in Poetry
Julia Johnson
TR 12:30

We meet twice a week for an extended meeting of poets. We will leave our comfort zones. This class is devoted to poetry by you and by others. It is a workshop-based class. We will together access and read an extensive amount of work by contemporary poets, with a particular focus on international poetry. The class is a casual operation, largely student driven. What you don’t ask, formulate, present, question, interrogate, assert, or wonder aloud, etc. will remain forever in the empty cavern of your heart.

ENG 570 001 SELECTED TOPICS FOR ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERATURE: Anitcolonial Writing and Thought: The Primary Documents
Peter Kalliney
TR 11:00

This course looks at the traditions of anticolonial thought from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Comparing movements for national liberation, realignment, and literary self-determination from across the world, we’ll consider the shifting claims of the British, American, French, Spanish, and Russian empires, and the colonial subjects, postcolonial frameworks, and decolonial movements that sought to contest these formations from Chile to Alcatraz, India to Ireland, and Azerbaijan to Martinique. Our focus will most often be on the manifestos and essays in which anticolonial writers outlined their literary and political programs, but we may also look at a few poems, stories, and films. From Vicente Huidobro’s fantasies of a secret international society to end British Imperialism to Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o’s call to abolish the English Department, how did the radical claims of anticolonial political thought take shape in literary writing? This course will be taught in conjunction with parallel courses offered by Professor Leah Feldman at the University of Chicago and Professor Harris Feinsod at Northwestern University. We anticipate building opportunities for cross-campus research among students as part of an ongoing, large-scale collaboration.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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