Spring Courses

 

Spring 2021

 

ENG 107 001-005 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING 
MW 1:00 F varies Crystal E. Wilkinson
 
This course will serve as an introduction to creative writing. Students will take an apprenticeship approach to the art and craft of poetry, fiction and nonfiction.  Students will study and practice writing in various modes as novice writers by reading the work of an array of published writers from diverse traditions and approaches, and by writing original work through exercises and formal assignments. Students will meet in lecture on Mondays and Wednesdays and meet in small groups for close reading of assigned texts as well as discussion of original work on Fridays. Course work includes extensive writing and reading. Fulfills the UK Core requirement for intellectual inquiry in Arts & Creativity. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement and provides ENG minor credit (from the Bulletin)
ENG 107 007-012 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
MW 12:00 F varies Julia M. Johnson

An introduction to the genres and craft of creative writing, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will study and practice writing in various modes through composition, peer critique, and research. Lecture or lecture with discussion section. Offers credit for the UK Core requirement in Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity. Provides ENG minor credit.
ENG 107 013 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
TR 11:00 makalani bandele

An introduction to the genres and craft of creative writing, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will study and practice writing in various modes through composition, peer critique, and research. Lecture or lecture with discussion section. Offers credit for the UK Core requirement in Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity. Provides ENG minor credit.
ENG 107 014 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
MWF 3:00 Emily Goldsmith

ENG 107 is designed to offer an introduction to the genres and elements of imaginative (or creative) writing, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will engage with writing through various avenues: close reading, composition, peer critique, and practice. This is an introduction course designed for the beginner. Throughout the semester, students will examine, discuss and consider craft elements, storytelling, forms, and how words can convey emotion. Classes will consist of lectures, in-class discussions of assigned readings, quizzes, writing exercises, and the creation of original work which will be peer-reviewed in small groups. Some sessions will occur on line. ENG 107 offers credit for UK Core requirement in Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity. It fulfills ENG pre-major requirement and provides ENG minor credit.
ENG 107 015 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
MWF 9:00 Michael McEwen

An introduction to the genres and craft of creative writing, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will study and practice writing in various modes through composition, peer critique, and research. Lecture or lecture with discussion section. Offers credit for the UK Core requirement in Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity. Provides ENG minor credit.
ENG 130 001 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Tales of Villainy
MWF 11:00 Michael Genovese

How often have you been reading a book and the bad guy seems so much more appealing than the forces of good?  Or how often have you wondered whether the villain in the book is really so guilty of wrongdoing?  Is the "good guy" really so clearly beyond reproach? In this course we will explore plays, novels, short stories, and poems in which villains clearly emerge, but our goal will be to look beyond good and evil.  What is the nature of the villainy?  What is its significance?  Does the bad character represent something bigger than himself, or is he an anomaly?  Is evil always some version of the same thing, or does it work differently depending on the context?  How does the literature contain the threat he or she poses, and are you buying it?  Readings will be drawn from British and American sources from the Renaissance to the twenty-first century.   The class will feature a few papers as well as a midterm and final exam.
ENG 130 002 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Good Girls, Bad Women
TR 11:00 Joyce M MacDonald

This course introduces students to literary works of various styles that deal with current subjects and creative applications. Topics vary by semester and are chosen to give a broad-based understanding of literary works, genres, creative techniques, or cultural trends (e.g., Literature and Other Art Forms; Film, Art, & Social Protest; Creative Writing, Mixed Media, & Social Media). See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Provides ENG Major or Minor Elective credit.
ENG 130 004  LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: Love Stories
MWF 1:00 Emily E Shortslef
 
Who doesn’t love a love story? In this class we’ll explore a selection of love stories from antiquity to the present from a range of genres, including plays, novels, short stories, poetry, songs, nonfiction, and film. In talking about love we will inevitably be talking about self-discovery and identity, gender and sexuality, and betrayal and loss, and our discussions about these texts will also serve as points of entry to the practices—and the delights—of literary analysis and interpretation.  
ENG 142 001 GLOBAL SHAKESPEARE
MWF 12:00 Emily E Shortslef

First written and performed in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century England, Shakespeare’s plays have had long and fascinating afterlives within as well as outside of Anglo-American contexts. In this course, we’ll read some of Shakespeare’s best-known plays (including Romeo and JulietHamlet, and Othello) alongside adaptations of these works from around the world. As we read the plays, we’ll discuss the theatrical culture and social milieu of Shakespeare’s England, but we’ll also consider what makes these plays so suited to reinterpretation and retelling across differences of language, culture, place, and time. The selected adaptations will allow us to examine the interpretive choices that these directors and writers have made in their engagements with Shakespeare, and to explore the implications of those choices. In addition to thinking about how Shakespeare’s dramas have been and continue to be rich sites for exploring cultural difference and cultural exchange, we will consider how—against long and ongoing histories of colonialist and racist uses of Shakespeare—various artists and activists have enlisted Shakespeare for anticolonialist and antiracist purposes. 
ENG 168 001 ALL THAT SPEAK OF JAZZ: AN INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY INTO JAZZ AND DEMOCRACY
TR 12:30 DaMaris B. Hill

This course is designed to be a hybrid cultural studies seminar and creative composition course that explores jazz theory as a philosophical artistic practice rooted in American democracy.  
  • This course will explore jazz aesthetics as a literary, visual, and musical art form.
  • It will also examine theories of jazz composition as philosophical statements that are in direct conversation with the principles of American democracy. 
  • The course will also discuss the philosophical and aesthetic relationship that connects jazz literature to surrealist and existentialist artistic movements in modern and postmodern cultural contexts.   
Artists, some of who may be considered marginalized citizens, to be discussed include James Baldwin, Harryette Mullen, and others. The theoretical aspects of this course will demonstrate how jazz has been a source of inspiration for a variety of twentieth/twenty-first century literatures and theoretical practices. The readings will be selections of fiction, poetry, drama, and essays with emphasis on jazz literary modes, creative trends, and political connotations specific to African American literature and culture. 
ENG 171 001 GLOBAL LITERATURE IN ENGLISH: Women of Color in Anglophone Literature 
MWF 10:00 Chinwe Morah

This course explores women of color writing in the twentieth to twenty-first centuries. We will look at anglophone literatures of the 20th and 21st centuries and will locate women of color in this tradition. Writings by women of color are often treated as an addendum in post-World War II anglophone literature. By focusing on female writers, I want students to get an interesting perspective on black literature when its women are placed at the center. This class is also an examination of the diversity found in modern Anglophone literature from around the world. We will dissect the idea of ‘Global English Literature’ and see how the worth of different texts have evolved, and continues to evolve. This will be a chance to appreciate how the English language evolves and adapts as it journeys around the globe. We will discuss how influences such as colonialism, imperialism, and globalization shaped the styles and subject matters of English literature, and will ask why it is important that we are exposed to the diverse range of stories told in English around the world. To do this, we will look at diverse depictions of identities such as race, gender, and sexual identity, and how individuals around the world cope with poverty, sexism, racism, and displacement. We will read texts written in and set in Europe, Africa, and Asia, and most of our texts will be Anglophone bildungsromans (coming of age stories). 
 
ENG 180 001-004 GREAT MOVIES: American Films of the 1950s
MW 2:00 F varies Alan M Nadel
 
We will examine very closely eight American films made in the 1950s: Including Singin’ in the Rain, Shane, The Searchers, The Defiant Ones, Rebel without a Cause and North by Northwest. Our goal will be to understand how all the elements of filmmaking are employed in in film to produce its meanings and effects. We will also attend closely to the ways in each film reflects the social and cinematic conventions and the cultural themes of its historical moment. Requirements: eight short quizzes, four multiple-choice exams, and a comprehensive final. There are no textbooks, but students are required to see the films on their own; many are available free online or through streaming services; others can be purchased at a nominal fee second hand on Amazon.
ENG 180 005 GREAT MOVIES: Science Fiction
MWF 12:00 Frederick K Bengtsson

Science fiction films have been around since the beginning of cinema. Filmmakers have transported us to the moon and taken us on space odysseys, have shown us futures both utopian and dystopian, have celebrated the possibilities of science and worried about its costs, have stretched the bounds of the imagination and pushed the possibilities of film. Along the way, we've had close encounters with aliens, robots, artificial intelligences—but also with ourselves. In this course we will watch and engage with a variety of science fiction films, thinking about how and why they tell their stories, about what is at stake in their representations of technology, of the alien, and of humanity, and about what the worlds that they imagine want to tell us about the world in which we live.
ENG 180 006 GREAT MOVIES: LGBT Romance film
TR 9:30 Gabrielle Oliver

In these discussion classes, we will review, respond, and react to contemporary LGBT romance films that have been released in the last 10 years. Through articles and other readings to assist our discussions, we will learn and talk about how/why these films were able to emerge in modern times – with respect to the social and political settings that the films were created in. We will also learn about/identify how social and political stressors create conflict in these films. Lastly, in our discussions, and with the importance of representation in mind, we will  be able to analyze each LGBT romance film we watch and voice our perceived success of each.
ENG 180 006 GREAT MOVIES: LGBT Romance film
TR 11:00 Gabrielle Oliver

In these discussion classes, we will review, respond, and react to contemporary LGBT romance films that have been released in the last 10 years. Through articles and other readings to assist our discussions, we will learn and talk about how/why these films were able to emerge in modern times – with respect to the social and political settings that the films were created in. We will also learn about/identify how social and political stressors create conflict in these films. Lastly, in our discussions, and with the importance of representation in mind, we will  be able to analyze each LGBT romance film we watch and voice our perceived success of each.
ENG 180 008 GREAT MOVIES: Celluloid Nightmares
TR 11:00 Titus Chalk

A class to watch through fingers or from behind the couch. Together, we will dive into the world of horror movies (broadly from the 1960s forwards), using the genre as a way to learn about filmic techniques upon which the most effective scares rely. We’ll look at the development of horror via its evolving sub-genres, examine the cultural context around horror and look to films from different regions to understand how the thrill of a good scare speaks to the human experience. While we will be rigorous in our criticism of each film, this class will feature mature and possibly offensive content.  
ENG 180 009 GREAT MOVIES: Coming of Age
MWF 11:00 Randall Roorda

To finesse the contradictory demands of a course that asks students to produce creative works of sorts different from the ones they study (that is, students study but do not make great movies), this section takes as its theme something class members should have experience with and something to get creative about. The theme is coming of age. In films from North America, Asia, Africa and Europe, made over the span of a century from the silent era to the present day, the class will explore how movies have depicted transitions from childhood tribulations to adult realizations and roles. Students will be invited to make sense of and respond to these movies and to make something of their own comparable life passages, in creative modes of their choice.
ENG 180 010 GREAT MOVIES: Good vs. Evil: The Enigma of Picking Sides
TR 9:30 Jessica Van Gilder

Why are we so drawn to superhero vs. supervillain narratives? What makes us root for the rogue antihero, underdog, or even, different colored marbles? What exactly is going on with our desire (perhaps even need) to pick sides? This course explores how narratives engage with, and sometimes challenge, our tendency to approach stories through the lens of good vs. evil. What happens when the notion of good vs. evil (or us vs. them) isn't so clearcut? Potential films include: Iron Man, Captain Marvel, Catch Me If You Can, Oceans 11, The Social Network, Child 44, Escape From Planet Earth, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, The Gentleman. Requirements: quizzes, short writing assignments, final. 
ENG 180 011 GREAT MOVIES: Good vs. Evil: The Enigma of Picking Sides
TR 11:00 Jessica Van Gilder

Why are we so drawn to superhero vs. supervillain narratives? What makes us root for the rogue antihero, underdog, or even, different colored marbles? What exactly is going on with our desire (perhaps even need) to pick sides? This course explores how narratives engage with, and sometimes challenge, our tendency to approach stories through the lens of good vs. evil. What happens when the notion of good vs. evil (or us vs. them) isn't so clearcut? Potential films include: Iron Man, Captain Marvel, Catch Me If You Can, Oceans 11, The Social Network, Child 44, Escape From Planet Earth, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, The Gentleman. Requirements: quizzes, short writing assignments, final. 
ENG 180 012 GREAT MOVIES: Spaces of Hope
TR 12:30 Daria Goncharova

We watch movies to escape. This is not a particularly new or controversial idea. Chances are that you heard or uttered some version of this statement this very year as the public health, economic, and racial crises of 2020 made all of us long for a better world. But if we consciously approach film as a celluloid space of hope production, some interesting questions begin to arise: where do some of the most celebrated films of the past decades take us? Into the nostalgic past, alternative present, or to the fantasy worlds and other planets? What do the characters hope for? Whose hopes are represented, whose hopes are shattered, and whose hopes do come true? We will address the questions as we view a wide range of Hollywood films—comedy, drama, science fiction, and thriller—from the 1940s to 2020. We will also attend to the films’ cultural context and major cinematic elements (mise-en-scene, montage, sound design, actors’ performance, genre categories) as we explore these diverse manifestations of American hope(s). 
ENG 180 013 GREAT MOVIES: Spaces of Hope
TR 2:00 Daria Goncharova

We watch movies to escape. This is not a particularly new or controversial idea. Chances are that you heard or uttered some version of this statement this very year as the public health, economic, and racial crises of 2020 made all of us long for a better world. But if we consciously approach film as a celluloid space of hope production, some interesting questions begin to arise: where do some of the most celebrated films of the past decades take us? Into the nostalgic past, alternative present, or to the fantasy worlds and other planets? What do the characters hope for? Whose hopes are represented, whose hopes are shattered, and whose hopes do come true? We will address the questions as we view a wide range of Hollywood films—comedy, drama, science fiction, and thriller—from the 1940s to 2020. We will also attend to the films’ cultural context and major cinematic elements (mise-en-scene, montage, sound design, actors’ performance, genre categories) as we explore these diverse manifestations of American hope(s). 
ENG 180 014 GREAT MOVIES: "Decade Under the Influence" -- The 70s
TR 3:00 John D Howell

The decade of the 70s was certainly one of the greatest -- if not the greatest -- in American film history. This course will feature movies from that spectacular decade, ranging from familiar popular and critical hits such as The Godfather through early masterworks by directors such as Martin Scorsese and Robert Altman, as well as great work from Terrence Malick, Steven Spielberg, and others. AND we'll look at a couple of European films (such as The Conformist) for their influence on what American directors were doing. Obviously you’ll need to know some historical context for the films -- the emergence of youth counter-culture and the war in Vietnam, e.g. -- as well as some film history, and you’ll need to understand and use terms pertaining to basic elements of film art, including mise-en-scène, editing, cinematography, sound, film genres, and the narrative structures of films. But primarily we’ll be watching significant movies, examining what we’re seeing, and thinking about how and why the movies work as they do. Short weekly quizzes, short Friday online writing assignments, Final exam.
ENG 191 001 LITERATURE AND THE ARTS OF CITIZENSHIP
TR 11:00 Armando Prats

“And here I cannot but take notice that the strange Temper of the People of London at that time contributed extremely to their own Destruction. . . . [T]he People [had] a mighty Fancy, that they should not be visited, or at least, that it would not be so violent among them.” So wrote Daniel Defoe in 1722 about the plague that killed over 100,000 (of a total population of 460,000) in the City of London during seven months in 1665-1666. This complaint of Defoe’s should sound familiar to many today: the people did not take the plague seriously enough (not even after it had spread) until it was entirely out of control. Also, the government (Charles II and his court) simply left London for the countryside, while Londoners—particularly those in the poorer districts—suffered the ravages of the plague without any government guidance. (Defoe reports that whole families, infected, would walk together to the mass graves outside of town and throw themselves in to await certain death). 
 
I do not doubt that most of you reading this course description have pretty much had it with the disruptions that Covid-19 has brought into your lives—even if you have escaped the plague, and even if your friends and families have been spared Covid-19’s worst effects. But this course offers chiefly a way of deepening the age-old human experience of persistent threats from devastating and seemingly mysterious diseases. Hard though it may be to believe, many communities have had to deal with the same anxieties, the same divisions, the same grief that we endure even today. It is almost always the case that communities afflicted by plague are at first ignorant of the sources of the illness, and so, too, of effective cures, even as fear takes an ever tighter hold. And this general dread—and the stubborn defiance of it that Defoe condemned—inevitably affects the way communities respond to the disease, to each other, and to their government. This course turns to literary texts—beginning with brief portions of the Bible and the Iliad, on to short passages from Thucydides (and Hippocrates) and to the full texts of Sophocles (Oedipus Rex), Defoe’s Journal of the Plague Year, E. A. Poe’s “Mask of the Red Death,” and Albert Camus’s The Plague, in addition to three movies that address plague (The Seventh Seal, Contagion, and I Am Legend)—to explore what happens to citizens and citizenship in the face of these inscrutable and stubborn epi/pandemics and to determine how the experiences of the ages accord, or don’t, with your own. 
 
Class is Zoom / synchronous. Quizzes, short-essay exams, final project. Attendance (synchronous) enforced.
 
ENG 207 001 BEG WKSP IMAG WRIT: Poetry
MWF 2:00 Emily Goldsmith

ENG 207 is a beginning course focusing on the elements and composition of poetry. In this course, students will learn how to approach reading, writing, and resonding to various styles and forms of poetry. We will read a few contemporary poetry books throughout the semester in order to indentify ways modern poets write, order and theme their collections. Through providing feedback on classmate's poems, and receiving feedback, we will learn how to revise our own work. Students will be expected to engage regularly in class discussion about the works we read and their own works. Students should also expect to have their work discussed and critiqued by the class in both small and large groups through respectful discussion, something we call the "workshop" method. Grades will be based on timely submission of the various writing assignments, participation, and a Portfolio containing revised poems. 
ENG 207 002 BEG WKSP IMAG WRIT: Creative Nonfiction
TR 9:30 Titus Chalk

As an introductory workshop, this class will teach students how to become not just better writers but constructive critics, employing craft terminology to improve their own work, as well as the work of their peers. The focus will be on non-fiction, often rooted in our experiences. Expect lots of reading and lots of writing – but also an examination of what you believe to be true about the world and a good-faith wrestle with how best to express it.  
ENG 207 003 BEG WKSP IMAG WRIT: Fiction
MWF 1:00 Gavin Colton

ENG 207 is a beginning course focusing on the art and craft of the short story. In this course, students will learn the building blocks of fiction through the exploration of core craft elements, as well as through the careful study of short stories by a diverse range of contemporary writers. Our chief objective is in learning how to read works of fiction critically and how to revise our own work in progress. Students are expected to engage regularly in class discussion about the works we read and their own works. In this class students will also compose fictional works of their own. This class follows the workshop model, so students should expect to have their work discussed and critiqued by the class in both small and large groups.
ENG 207 004 BEG WKSP IMAG WRIT: Fiction
MWF 12:00 Gavin Colton

ENG 207 is a beginning course focusing on the art and craft of the short story. In this course, students will learn the building blocks of fiction through the exploration of core craft elements, as well as through the careful study of short stories by a diverse range of contemporary writers. Our chief objective is in learning how to read works of fiction critically and how to revise our own work in progress. Students are expected to engage regularly in class discussion about the works we read and their own works. In this class students will also compose fictional works of their own. This class follows the workshop model, so students should expect to have their work discussed and critiqued by the class in both small and large groups.
ENG 230 001 INTRO TO LIT: This is America
TR 2:00 Jannell Parsons
 
What is America, what makes it great or not, and who gets to decide? Whose lives matter, whose stories matter, and why do so many of us often seem to have different answers to these questions? Such questions are all the more urgent right now in the wake of a summer of Black Lives Matter protests and ongoing state violence against Black people as well as anti-Black racism embedded in our universities, our communities, and our daily lives. In this class, we will ask what stories and storytelling can do in the face of American violence, protest, and resistance. Do the books we read, the tv shows we watch, the stories we share with each other in person and on social media matter? And if they do matter, how and why? What are the limits and what are the possibilities of these stories? This class features a wide range of storytelling genres, including non-fiction, memoir, oral history, poetry, YA fiction, science fiction, and contemporary television shows from the 1850s to 2020 and will include such brilliant storytellers as Harriet Jacobs, Zora Neale Hurston, Jesmyn Ward and more. In this class we will pay special attention to factors of race and gender, as well as to the role of politics, in the stories we read as we ask why and how storytelling even matters.
ENG 230 002 INTRO TO LIT: This is America
TR 3:30 Jannell Parsons
 
What is America, what makes it great or not, and who gets to decide? Whose lives matter, whose stories matter, and why do so many of us often seem to have different answers to these questions? Such questions are all the more urgent right now in the wake of a summer of Black Lives Matter protests and ongoing state violence against Black people as well as anti-Black racism embedded in our universities, our communities, and our daily lives. In this class, we will ask what stories and storytelling can do in the face of American violence, protest, and resistance. Do the books we read, the tv shows we watch, the stories we share with each other in person and on social media matter? And if they do matter, how and why? What are the limits and what are the possibilities of these stories? This class features a wide range of storytelling genres, including non-fiction, memoir, oral history, poetry, YA fiction, science fiction, and contemporary television shows from the 1850s to 2020 and will include such brilliant storytellers as Harriet Jacobs, Zora Neale Hurston, Jesmyn Ward and more. In this class we will pay special attention to factors of race and gender, as well as to the role of politics, in the stories we read as we ask why and how storytelling even matters.
ENG 230 003 INTRO TO LIT: Menace, Monsters, & the Gothic
MWF 2:00 PM Shannon Branfield

On the hill, there is a house. In the attic, there is a ghost. In the woods, there are monsters. Gothic fiction uses the supernatural to explore the nature of humanity and the rational bounds of our world. What does it mean to be human? What, or who, is monstrous? What is the nature of evil? In this class, we will investigate the figure of the monster and their connection, or opposition, to society. Incorporating classic gothic fiction, supernatural stories, monster fiction, and modern horror, this class will use a variety of media, including FrankensteinDraculaScooby Doo, and Night Vale to explore what is human, what is Other, and just what is lurking in the dark. 
ENG 242 001-002 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE II: Belonging and Dissent
MW 11:00 F varies Peter J. Kalliney
 
In this survey class, covering the period 1700 to the present, we will use the related themes of belonging and dissent to frame our discussions of British literary history.  How do various writers express and critique forms of affiliation to national, religious, economic, ethnic, social, and intellectual communities?  Under what conditions do texts consolidate group identities, and when do writers employ literature to critique or challenge boundaries of inclusion and exclusion?  Over the course of the semester, students will become acquainted with some of the major British authors and movements since the turn of the eighteenth century.  By the end of the class, students will be able to appreciate the distinctive intellectual and stylistic concerns of individual writers, but I also hope the course will encourage us to consider how texts create their own group identities by borrowing, modifying, and inverting existing literary creations.  Readings will include poetry, drama, fiction, and essays.  Examinations, quizzes, writing assignments, attendance, and level of preparedness will be used to evaluate student performance.
ENG 252 001-002 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II 
MW 3:00 F varies Alan M Nadel

This course will look at the major works of American fiction and poetry published between the end of the Civil War and World War II. We will study how they reflect changing literary and cultural trends, including Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, Expressionism, and Imagism. We will attend to an author’s characteristic stylistic and thematic traits, especially in regard to the ways in which they reflect their historical moment. The writers whose work we will consider include Whitman, Dickenson, Frost, Eliot, W.C. Williams, Twain, Wharton, James, Fitzgerald, Hurston, and Faulkner. There will be two take-home exams, several short answer exams (you may use notes) and quizzes, and a final exam.
ENG 260 001 INTRODUCTION TO BLACK WRITERS
MWF 1:00 Charles Quinn

An introduction to written and oral works by Black authors of Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. The course includes writers such as Chinua Achebe (Africa), Wilson Harris (Caribbean), and Toni Morrison (USA), as well as others from the diverse field of literature written by African-American authors and authors of color worldwide. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 264. Same as AAS 264.
ENG 260 002 INTRODUCTION TO BLACK WRITERS
MWF 11:00 Charles Quinn

An introduction to written and oral works by Black authors of Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. The course includes writers such as Chinua Achebe (Africa), Wilson Harris (Caribbean), and Toni Morrison (USA), as well as others from the diverse field of literature written by African-American authors and authors of color worldwide. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 264. Same as AAS 264.
ENG 265 001 SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE I 
9:30 AM Nazera Wright

This course explores African-American literature from the mid-eighteenth century to Reconstruction and after, with an emphasis on selected genres, periods, and thematic characteristics of the early African-American cultural and literary experience. Topics include colonialism and abolitionism; early black aesthetics, narratives of enslavement, and drama, novels, and poetry. Authors include Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Nat Turner, Sojourner Truth, Harriet Jacobs, Martin Delaney, Frederick Douglass, and more.
ENG 280 001 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
MWF 10:00 Frederick K Bengtsson

An introduction to the study of films as narrative art and cultural documents. The course involves viewing and analyzing films from different genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to view films closely, how to relate films to their contexts, and how to employ the basic terms and concepts of film analysis. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. Viewing films outside of class is required. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.
ENG 280 002 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
MWF 1:00 Frederick K Bengtsson

This course will introduce students to the study of cinema as a medium, and to the tools and vocabulary of film analysis. By learning about and attending to key elements of film production and form (genre, cinematography, mise-en-scène, editing, sound and lighting, etc.) in a variety of films, we will consider the ways in which filmmakers shape our experience of their work and create meaning within it. We will move beyond watching films passively toward thinking about them analytically, both in artistic and aesthetic terms, and in terms of the ideas they explore and engage with. Grade will be based on a midterm, a final exam, and regular written assignments. Viewing films outside of class is required. Fulfills the UK Core requirement in Humanities.
ENG 280 003 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
TR12:30 Michael Carter

This course will examine the lens through which film making shows us ourselves, our world, and our ever changing culture. Since film’s earliest days controversies have waxed and waned within the cinema (violence, sex, and language anyone?) and various methods of censoring or restricting the medium have been attempted, and still film thrives as a major industry. Perhaps films persist because whether live actors, animation, historical, contemporary, or futuristic, film presents a view of humanity that the writers and directors bring to life visually, aurally, and emotionally. We will consider all parts of the process and product. You will be required to write two (2) critical responses to the films which will be the bulk of your grade for the course. The remainder of the grade will be determined by attendance, regular quizzes, and a midterm test.
ENG 280 004 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
TR 9:30 Matthew Godby

An introduction to the study of films as narrative art and cultural documents. The course involves viewing and analyzing films from different genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to view films closely, how to relate films to their contexts, and how to employ the basic terms and concepts of film analysis. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. Viewing films outside of class is required. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.
ENG 280 005 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
TR 11:00 Matthew Godbey

An introduction to the study of films as narrative art and cultural documents. The course involves viewing and analyzing films from different genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to view films closely, how to relate films to their contexts, ad how to employ the basic terms and concepts of film analysis. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. Viewing films outside of class is required. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit. Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 281.
ENG 280 006 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
MWF 2:00 Jenn Murray

From Hamilton to Rocky, film representations of American dreams are as diverse and varied as the American dreamers they present on the silver screen. This course will consider a number of films representing different portrayals of the mythic and yet not at all monolithic “American Dream.” In addition to the textbook study of formal elements of film and film-making, such as genre, cinematography, sound, editing, etc., this class will require students to view approximately one film per week outside of class and participate in large and small group discussions that move beyond the plot of the film and into a consideration of its form and the ways in which the film represents (or misrepresents) course themes. Graded work in the course will include written critical and analytical responses, quizzes, and a final multimedia project.
ENG 280 007 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
MWF 3:00 Jenn Murray

From Hamilton to Rocky, film representations of American dreams are as diverse and varied as the American dreamers they present on the silver screen. This course will consider a number of films representing different portrayals of the mythic and yet not at all monolithic “American Dream.” In addition to the textbook study of formal elements of film and film-making, such as genre, cinematography, sound, editing, etc., this class will require students to view approximately one film per week outside of class and participate in large and small group discussions that move beyond the plot of the film and into a consideration of its form and the ways in which the film represents (or misrepresents) course themes. Graded work in the course will include written critical and analytical responses, quizzes, and a final multimedia project.
ENG 280 008 INTRODUCTION TO FILM
MWF 1:00 Randall Roorda

This is a course in watching, understanding, and responding to films. The theme, one well suited to an introduction, will be movies about movies, including films depicting the making of motion pictures, movies featuring movies within them (screens on screen), films dramatizing key aspects of filmmaking (script, camera, performance), and films implicitly concerned with staring at screens or viewing the world as if it took place on a screen. We’ll focus on history, culture, authorship and creative expression, without neglecting technical aspects. Assignments include frequent short writings and some quizzes, some big.
ENG 290 001 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S LITERATURE
MWF 10:00 Katie McClain

A new storyteller can create an entirely different story, just as a retelling can become even more powerful than an original version. The American women storytellers discussed in this course tell such powerful, reconfigured stories in order to rewrite assumptions about American culture. During this semester, we will explore familiar American narratives from various perspectives – in particular American women from the 19th century to the present – to better understand how important the power of “retelling” can truly be. Through these diverse narratives, we will consider questions of gender, race, class, sexuality, and national identity in the United States; we will examine such contexts via novels, short stories, film, nonfiction, poetry, drama, and graphic novels. Students will complete written analysis on historical and cultural contexts, produce presentations on texts by American women writers, and create a final group digital project. Content will include writing from authors such as Toni Morrison, Alison Bechdel, Joyce Carol Oates, and Joy Harjo, as well as films by directors such as Greta Gerwig and Ava DuVernay.  
ENG 307 001 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING: Poetry and Flash fiction in Nature
TR 11:00 Michael Carter

We are it. We are in it. From the amoeba to the blue whale, from the algae to the giant redwoods, from the bit of sand to the solar system, life and nature are here always for us to examine. But how often to we step off the sidewalk and take the magnifying glass of our minds and see into this world? Do we notice the emerald glisten on a beetle's carapace? The dance of the birds on the wire? Our own heartbeat's melody? In this course, we will wander into these worlds and tell their stories in condensed forms – the poem, and short, short fiction. Forms that will challenge our word play and our ability to see the atom in the sun, the period at the end of a sentence, and the dark at the end of the tunnel. We will work to eliminate all but the poem's or short fiction's center and make it huge. By the end of the semester we will have a sheaf of our own and others' writing ... our harvest.
ENG 330 001 TEXT AND CONTEXT: Literature in Victorian London
TR 12:30 Jill Rappoport

For the 19th-century authors this course examines, London was a place of contradictions. Center of a wealthy and expanding empire, it was also a site of filth, poverty, and crime. The city offered opportunity but also danger to its visitors and inhabitants; it was a showcase of both civic reform and social scandal. Despite tremendous growth in population, the urban experience was frequently one of isolation and alienation. In this course, we will explore the possibilities that Victorian London provided for the literary imagination. How did urban space shape, conceal, or reveal character? How did the different perspectives of tourist, detective, reformer, prostitute, or child help to construct popular ideas about London? What literary genres emerged out of the changing conditions of the city? We will read poetry, fiction, and essays, mapping various literary and social projects within the rapidly changing spaces of an increasingly modern city. The course has two primary aims: to introduce you to a range of key nineteenth-century authors and literary forms through close, critical reading, and to provoke your thoughtful assessment of the relationships between these texts and their cultural contexts.
ENG 330 002 TEXT AND CONTEXT: Dark Mark Twain's No. 44, The Mysterious Stranger
TR 9:30 Michael Carter

We know the kindly, mustachioed, white-haired-gentleman author of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and of “Leaping Frog …” fame, and the humorist who traveled the globe cheering thousands with his irreverent views on governments and the late 19th century world. What we may be less familiar with is the cynical, “blasphemous” writer that even his family hid from the public after his death. This dark Twain tackled religion’s hypocrisy and mankind’s ignorance as well as other issues of his day. We’ll begin with Adam and take our tour of Mark Twain’s Bible through to the early 20th century and “The Mysterious Stranger” that Samuel Clemens was. Work load will be daily readings, two short essays, one larger essay, tests and quizzes, and other contextual assignments.
ENG 330 003 TEXT AND CONTEXT: Robinson Crusoe
MWF 12:00 Michael Genovese

Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, published in 1719, is widely regarded as the first novel.  In many ways, it gave birth to prose fiction as we still know it today: as a story that takes place in a familiar, realistic world occupied by people doing things we recognize as everyday.  But what is familiar?  Realistic?  Everyday?  Are people and characters even the same thing?  As we study Defoe’s novel, we will stretch into its literary past and future in order to explore these questions and come to terms with what it meant to be the “first” novel and what it still means to be a novel today.  We will read novels by Defoe as well as works selected from the following novelists: Bunyan, Haywood, Coetzee, and Joyce.  There will also be regular reading of critical and theoretical essays related these novels.  Expect approximately 120 pages of reading per week, as well as about 20 pages of writing.  Active participation is required, and there will be a cumulative final exam.  
ENG 330 004 TEXT AND CONTEXT: Foundling Narrative 
TR 11:00 Lisa Zunshine

What do Luke Skywalker, Hercules, Moses, Oedipus, and Superman have in common? They are all fictional "foundlings”brought up by people other than their parents and discovering that their fate (glorious or ignominious) is bound up with their true heritage. This course will introduce students to literary analysis by following the development of the "foundling narrative" in fiction.
ENG 339 001 (HONORS) AUTHOR STUDIES: George Orwell
MWF 10:00 Peter J. Kalliney
 
What makes George Orwell such a compelling writer, now?  Is it his deceptively plain style, his willingness to speak out against hypocrisy, his stubborn belief in democratic socialism?  Even as the major political concerns that animate his writing have passed into history--the Spanish Civil War, fascism, totalitarianism, European imperialism, the Cold War--his writings somehow retain their ability to speak to contemporary audiences.  In this course, we will think about these questions as we read a range of Orwell's writing: novels, documentaries, political essays, ethnographic writing, war reporting, and book reviews.  Highlights will include Down and Out in Paris and London, "Politics and the English Language," and 1984.
ENG 342 001 SHAKESPEARE 
MWF 11:00 Walt Foreman

An introductory survey of Shakespeare's plays, covering all forms (comedies, histories, and tragedies) and periods (early, middle, and late). We will examine Shakespearean theater and performance (physical and philosophical architecture, performance as interpretation, visualization of written texts, audience as part of action, play as play); Shakespearean language and its relation to "truth" (arguments, meanings, metaphors, puns, verse, poetry: in short, wordplay); the way the structure of the plays produces meaning (function and order of scenes); the way words make characters, and the way characters interact, verbally and visually; and the social implications of the plays (for both the 16/17th and the 20th centuries) and the ways audiences (including ourselves) interpret the plays. Among the eight plays likely to be included are A Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, Henry IV Part 1, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Tempest.
ENG 368 001 CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN-AMERICAN VOICES 
MWF 2:00 Regina Hamilton

Contemporary African American literature often includes texts published as far back as the 1970s and 1980s. In this course I am going to shrink this timetable to only include African American literature published in the twenty-first century. Interestingly, that still gives us twenty years of novels, movies, music, and video games to engage in this course. Though every era is intimately connected to the one before, maybe through the forms, settings, and characters central to twenty-first black media, we can begin to consider some of the distinct contours of a twenty-first century version of black aesthetics. Are there now true differences between the issues and/or discursive responses of twentieth and twenty-first century black Americans? My hope is that through critically engaging texts, movies, and music by Jesmyn Ward, Kiese Laymon, Rivers Solomon, Colson Whitehead, Janelle Monae, Jordan Peele, and others, we might begin to answer that question. 
ENG 370 001 LITERATURE ACROSS BORDERS 
TR 2:00 Jap-Nanak Makkar

This course will introduce students to key texts from several literary traditions shaped by British colonialism. Colonialism, as we’ll learn, was a form of political control that brought new technologies, institutions and languages to the colonies while establishing relations of economic and racial oppression. As we engage with 20th- and 21st-century literature from South Asia, the Caribbean and Africa, we examine the relationship between economic conquest and literary form. How do Nigerian novelists describe the intrusion represented by British imperialists? How do poets reconcile tropes originating in Jamaican folklore with the constraints of the British lyric, and what does that fusion amount to? How do writers of the formerly colonized world recover details about their ancestors when they are missing from official history? In what literary forms can they convey centuries of pain and anger? By the course’s end, students will learn to see postcolonial literature as an agent capable of stirring moral sentiment and empathy; challenging ideas of racial or cultural superiority; and contributing to world-historical shifts, such as the break-up of empire. Readings by Frantz Fanon, Chinua Achebe, J. M. Coetzee, Zoë Wicomb, Caryl Phillips, Ghassan Kanafani, Louise Bennett, Kamau Brathwaite and Agha Shahid Ali.  
ENG 384 001 LITERATURE AND FILM 
TR 12:30 PM Armando Prats

This course explores the relationship between two creative traditions, literature and film, focusing on film adaptations of literary works for the screen. Subjects can include the adaptation of works by a particular writer such as Shakespeare or Jane Austen, or it may range more widely among the thousands of innovative cinematic reinventions of literary texts, e.g. Richardson's Tom Jones, Altman's Short Cuts. In some semesters the course may focus on a particular topic or genre and its treatment in both literary and cinematic texts, or on a particular moment when cinema and literary writers exerted a strong mutual influence (such as Hollywood in the 1920's). Viewing films outside of class is required. Open to students from any major. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
ENG 391 001 LITERARY THEORY 
MW 3:00 Matthew Giancarlo
 
Since the 1940's "literary theory" has emerged as a vibrant and vital aspect of literary studies. The term covers a wide range of formal, historical, and critical approaches to literature and culture that have changed the ways we read. This course investigates selected trends and schools of modern literary theory in diverse texts and contexts. These can include formalism, Practical Criticism, and the New Criticism; French Structuralism and the various modes of post-structuralism (Semiotics, Deconstruction, Reader-response, Speech-act theory); historicism and the New Historicism; as well as broader modes of cultural critique such as Feminism, Marxism, Critical Theory and the Frankfurt School, Post-colonialism, Critical Race Theory, and more. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
ENG 407 001 INTERM WKSP CTV WRIT:  Everyday Stories
TR 4:00 (Meets with ENG 507-002) Gurney Norman

This is a course in nonfiction writing in which students tell stories of their remembered personal and family experiences, histories and backgrounds. By writing a minimum of five pages or fifteen hundred words per week for twelve weeks students produce a manuscript of about sixty pages which is a substantial beginning of a book. Everyone has had significant life experiences, some happy, some sad, that they do not want to forget. Everyone has memories that will not go away. Everyone knows interesting stories from observed life around them. Such materials are subjects worthy of cultivating in written form. 
ENG 407 002 INTERM WKSP CTV WRIT: Poetry-Make It Better
TR 11:00 John D Howell

This is an "Author Out" workshop, as it should be, which means that you as the Writer will listen to what Readers say about your work in workshop. You will not interact with the Readers until they're done. Obviously you won't need to accept everything that's said. But if there's a notable disparity between what you want your poem to "do" and the Readers' understanding of what you're doing, that's something you should pay attention to. So yes, you can make a poem "better." There might be a poet somewhere who has never revised a poem to make it better, but I don't know of any. You'll be writing and submitting a poem every week, and doing some exercises to help generate poems, and reading and discussing some poems by people who have published books. Otherwise we'll be workshopping in most class sessions. It's a simple course design. Your work will benefit from what we do. Plus my workshops tend to be something like (quiet) fun.
ENG 407 003 INTERM WKSP CTV WRIT: Two Modes: Linear and Modular Storytelling
TR 4:30 Andrew Milward
 
This is an intermediate course in the art and craft of fiction writing, only available for those students who have already satisfactorily completed ENG 207 (Beginning Workshop in Fiction Writing). This course assumes that students have a solid foundation for understanding the basic elements of fiction writing, and over the course of the semester we will look to enhance and challenge that understanding. Students will write more intensively and extensively than previously, testing out narrative forms that are both traditionally linear and nontraditionally modular. We will examine how various craft elements are at work in the stories of professional writers, and very often these texts will serve as templates and inspiration. However, this class will primarily follow the workshop model, and therefore student work, and the discussion of same, will be our main focus. To that end, over the course of the semester students will be required to produce two complete stories, as well as a revision and a paper about the revision process. Additional requirements include keeping a reading journal, writing thoughtful and constructive critique letters, and frequent participation. 
ENG 425 001 ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING
MWF 10:00 Michael McEwen

This course asks students to think critically about what it means to write about the environment. How do we move through the world around us, from the mountains and forests of places like Eastern Kentucky to the domesticated environments of urban centers like Lexington? Students will explore literary fiction and poetry, scientific studies, film and advertisement, visual arts, and other representations of the natural world and consider how they act as forms of activism. This course will also place students in a workshop setting in which they will practice environmental writing and critiquing peers’ work. By the end of the semester, students will have produced a body of creative and persuasive writing about the environment.
ENG 425 002 ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING
MWF 2:00 Erik Reece

This course will introduce students from all majors to both the literature and the practice of environmental writing. "Environmental writing” is in many ways a sequel to “nature writing.” Whereas the great American nature writers like Henry David Thoreau and John Muir celebrated this country’s wilderness and urged readers to avail themselves of it more often, environmental writers approach the same subject with less innocence and more urgency. Take, for example, UK’s own Robinson Forest. A nature writer would celebrate its beautiful streams and rock formations; an environmental writer might do that too, but then she or he would point out that Robinson Forest is surrounded and threatened by mountaintop removal strip mining. In other words, environmental writers take seriously the threat that human beings pose to the natural world. In this course, we will move from more traditional nature writing into the contemporary debates of environmental writing. One of this country’s foremost environmental writers, Bill McKibben, had claimed that environmental writing might be “Americans single most distinctive contribution to the world’s literature,” yet it clearly hasn’t been successful enough in curbing Americans’ addiction to fossil fuels, agricultural chemicals, and a consumer culture that is the main driver of climate change. And yet there have been important environmental victories brought about primarily by writers: Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring led to the banning of DDT; Wendell Berry’s Unsettling of America let to the organic, local food movement that has changed the way millions of Americans grow, eat and shop for food. There are many more examples. The point being: writing remains one of the most important ways to effect change. It is one of the most effective ways to advocate for what Aldo Leopold famously called the Land Ethic. “In short,” wrote Leopold sixty-some years ago, “a land ethic changes the role of Homo sapiens from conqueror of the land-community to plain member and citizen of it.” All of the writing we do this semester will be in the service of that fine ideal. To that end, this course will move back and forth between nature writing and environmental writing so students can learn and practice the strengths of both approaches. We will emphasize writing with empathy, passion, authority and concreteness.
ENG 440G 001 STUDIES IN BRITISH LIT: Love and Death in Modern Ireland
MWF 11:00 AM Jonathan M. Allison

A course on Modern Irish Literature and Culture, 1900-2000, including the fiction of James Joyce (Ulysses), Frank O'Connor (Guests of the Nation), Elizabeth Bowen (The Last September) and Edna O’Brien (Country Girls), and the poetry, drama and folklore of W.B. Yeats, Lady Gregory, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland, and others. We will study the work of several Irish painters and artists (such as Jack Yeats and Sean Keating) and think about the role of visual cultures in relation to 20th century social and political life. Themes to be explored include sexuality, nationalism, protest, and postcolonialism; the place of the rural and the idealization of the west; heroism and attitudes to dying and death; Celticism and Gaelic culture.
ENG 460G 001 STUDIES IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE: Black Speculative Fiction
TR 3:00 Regina Hamilton

An advanced African-American literature course on a period, a theme, a genre, or one or more authors. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. Prerequisite ENG 330 Text and Context or consent of the instructor. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
ENG 480 001 STUDIES IN FILM: Some Like it Hot: The Films of Billy Wilder
TR 3:00 Jordan Brower

Billy Wilder—an iconoclast who reveled in the dark side of American life and gleefully transgressed its taboos—paradoxically made some of mainstream Hollywood’s most celebrated movies. In this course, we will survey Wilder’s career as a director and writer from the late 1930s to the early 1980s, both to gain an appreciation for his work in a dazzling array of genres and to track parallel developments in Hollywood art and industry. We’ll devote most of our time to Wilder’s best work, including Double Indemnity (1944), Sunset Boulevard (1950), Some Like it Hot (1959), and The Apartment (1960), but will attend as well to some of the more controversial or “minor” movies as well. 
ENG 495 001 HONORS SEMINAR: History, Myth, and Empire in Shakespeare’s Roman Plays
TR 12:30 Joyce M MacDonald

An advanced undergraduate seminar in literature, film, or cultural study. Honors seminar topics will be announced the preceding year. Required for graduation with Departmental Honors in English. May be repeated up to 9 hours under different subtitles. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit. Prereq: ENG major; completion of premajor requirements and ENG 330; ENG major GPA of 3.5 or above. Enrollment limited to junior and senior ENG majors.
ENG 507 001 ADV WKSHP IMAG WRTNG: Poetry-Make It Matter
TR 12:30 PM 1:45 PM John D Howell

Because you've made your way through other workshops on your way to this one, I don't think I need to explain to you what I expect you to be doing. I expect a poem a week -- you'll have some specific prompts now and then to help you generate work -- and I expect that we'll workshop every poem. I'll expect you to read some assigned work etc., but mainly you'll be submitting poems and workshopping. "Make It Matter" is a subtitle that exists primarily for the Registrar and class scheduling / publicity. But of course I expect you want your work to matter in some way, yes? And there are lots of ways a poem can matter, many ways that a poem can be "important." All I want is your commitment to take seriously the work that you're doing, even if your poem is joking.
ENG 507 002 ADV WKSHP IMAG WRTNG: Everyday Stories 
TR 4:00 PM (Meets with ENG 407-001) Gurney Norman

This is a course in nonfiction writing in which students tell stories of their remembered personal and family experiences, histories and backgrounds. By writing a minimum of five pages or fifteen hundred words per week for twelve weeks students produce a manuscript of about sixty pages which is a substantial beginning of a book. Everyone has had significant life experiences, some happy, some sad, that they do not want to forget. Everyone has memories that will not go away. Everyone knows interesting stories from observed life around them. Such materials are subjects worthy of cultivating in written form. 
ENG 507 003 ADV WKSHP IMAG WRTNG: Possibilities in Contemporary Literary Short Fiction
TR 3:00 Andrew Milward
 
This is an advanced course in the art and craft of fiction writing, only available for those students with prior experience in fiction workshops. To be enrolled, students must have satisfactorily completed at least two of the following courses: ENG 107 (Introduction to Imaginative Writing), ENG 207 (Introduction to Fiction Writing), and ENG 407 (Intermediate Fiction Writing)—preferably all three. This course assumes that you have a serious interest in writing fiction, and together we will focus on the work of becoming serious writers. We will examine how various craft points are at work in the stories of professional writers, and very often these texts will serve as templates and inspiration. However, this class will primarily follow the workshop model, and therefore student work, and the discussion of same, will be our main focus. To that end, over the course of the semester students will be required to produce two complete stories, as well a substantial revision, a paper about the revision process, and an artist statement.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
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