New Undergraduate Curriculum 2013

ENG English Courses: Revised Curriculum FOR FALL 2013 ONWARD

ENG 107 WRITING CRAFT: INTRODUCTION TO IMAGINATIVE WRITING (UK Core)
ENG 130 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: (Subtitle required)
ENG 142 SHAKESPEARE: TEXT, PERFORMANCE, FILM
ENG 171 GLOBAL LITERATURE IN ENGLISH (UK Core)
ENG 180 GREAT MOVIES: (Subtitle required)
ENG 191 LITERATURE AND THE ARTS OF CITIZENSHIP (UK Core)
 
ENG/WRD 205 INTERMEDIATE WRITING
ENG 207 BEGINNING WORKSHOP IN IMAGINATIVE WRITING
ENG/LIN 209 THE STRUCTURE AND USE OF ENGLISH (UK Core)
ENG/LIN 221 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS I
ENG 230 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (UK Core, GWR)
ENG 241 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I 
ENG 242 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE II 
ENG 251 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I 
ENG 252 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II 
ENG 260/AAAS 264 INTRODUCTION TO BLACK WRITERS (UK Core, GWR)
ENG 265 SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE I
ENG 266 SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE II
ENG 271 THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE 
ENG 274 CLASSICS OF WESTERN LITERATURE
ENG 280 INTRODUCTION TO FILM (UK Core, GWR)
ENG 284 HISTORY OF FILM I
ENG 285 HISTORY OF FILM II
ENG 290 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S LITERATURE (UK Core, GWR)
 
ENG/WRD 301 STYLE FOR WRITERS
ENG/LIN 310 AMERICAN ENGLISH
ENG 330 TEXT AND CONTEXT: (Subtitle required)
ENG 337 LITERATURE AND GENRE
ENG 338 TOPICS IN LITERATURE: (Subtitle required)
ENG 339 AUTHOR STUDIES: (Subtitle required)
ENG 341 CHAUCER AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES
ENG 342 SHAKESPEARE
ENG 343 RENAISSANCE DRAMA AND SOCIETY
ENG 345 BRITISH POETRY
ENG 347 THE RISE OF THE BRITISH NOVEL
ENG 348 VICTORIAN NOVELS AND THEIR WORLDS
ENG 349 MODERNISM
ENG 352 AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURES TO 1900
ENG 353 AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURES POST-1900
ENG 355 AMERICAN POETIC TRADITIONS
ENG 357 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 359 THE KENTUCKY LITERARY HERITAGE
ENG 361 EARLY AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 362 FLIGHTS TO FREEDOM: LITERATURE OF THE GREAT BLACK MIGRATIONS
ENG 368 CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN-AMERICAN VOICES
ENG 369 AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN’S WRITING
ENG 370 LITERATURE ACROSS BORDERS
ENG 380 FILM AND GENRE: (Subtitle required)
ENG 384 LITERATURE AND FILM
ENG 391 LITERARY THEORY
ENG 395 INDEPENDENT STUDY
 
ENG/WRD 401 SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING: (Subtitle required)
ENG/WRD 405 EDITING ENGLISH PROSE
ENG 407 INTERMEDIATE WORKSHOP IN IMAGINATIVE WRITING: (Subtitle required)
ENG 440G STUDIES IN BRITISH LITERATURE: (Subtitle required) 
ENG 450G STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE: (Subtitle required) 
ENG 460G STUDIES IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE: (Subtitle required) 
ENG 470G COMPARATIVE AND TRANSNATIONAL STUDIES IN LITERATURE: (Subtitle required) 
ENG 480G STUDIES IN FILM: (Subtitle required)
ENG 490G STUDIES IN LITERATURE AND GENDER: (Subtitle required)
ENG 491G STUDIES IN THEORY: (Subtitle required) 
ENG 492G CULTURAL STUDIES: (Subtitle required) 
ENG 495 MAJOR HONORS SEMINAR: (Subtitle required)
 
ENG 507 ADVANCED WORKSHOP IN IMAGINATIVE WRITING: (Subtitle required)
ENG/EDC 509 COMPOSITION FOR TEACHERS
ENG/EDC 510 STUDIES IN ENGLISH FOR TEACHERS: (Subtitle required)
ENG/LIN 512 ANALYSIS OF ENGLISH SYNTAX
ENG/LIN 513 TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
ENG/LIN 514 TESL MATERIALS AND METHODS
ENG/LIN 518 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
ENG/LIN 519 INTRODUCTION TO OLD ENGLISH
 
ENG English Course Descriptions and hours
 
ENG 107 INTRODUCTION TO IMAGINATIVE WRITING (UK Core: Arts & Creativity) (3)
An introduction to the genres and craft of imaginative writing, including fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will study and practice writing in various modes through composition, peer critique, and research. Lecture and workshop. Offers credit for the UK Core requirement in Intellectual Inquiry in Arts & Creativity. fulfills ENG pre-major requirement and provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 130 LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: (Subtitle required) (3)
A course introducing students to literary works of various genres and styles, from both historical and contemporary authors, that deal with a particular issue or theme. Topics vary by semester and are chosen by faculty to give a broad-based understanding of significant literary works and cultural trends. Intended as a general humanities course for non-majors. Lecture. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or provide ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 142 SHAKESPEARE: TEXT, PERFORMANCE, FILM (3)
An introductory course in the works of the greatest dramatist of the English language, covering selected plays of Shakespeare in different periods and media, and tracing changes in their interpretation from his day to our own. Intended as a general humanities course for non-majors. Lecture and section. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or provide ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 171 GLOBAL LITERATURE IN ENGLISH (UK Core: Global Dynamics) (3)
A course exploring the diversity and significance of English literature from across the world. To what extent is English now a global language, no longer the property of any national group? How has fiction contributed to the process of internationalizing English? To answer these questions and others, this course examines the idea of global citizenship and cosmopolitan English through the work of some of the language’s most compelling international novelists. Lecture. Offers credit for the UK Core requirement in Global Citizenship. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or provide ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 180 GREAT MOVIES: (Subtitle required) (3)
A course introducing students to films of various genres and styles, from both historical and contemporary filmmakers, investigating a particular issue or theme. Topics vary by semester and are chosen by faculty to give a broad-based understanding of important cinematic works and trends. Intended as a general humanities course for non-majors. Lecture and section. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or provide ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 191 LITERATURE AND THE ARTS OF CITIZENSHIP (UK Core: U.S. Citizen. or Inquiry Hum.) (3)
A survey and investigation of contemporary literature of modern American citizenship, with an emphasis on questions of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and socioeconomic class. Lecture. Offers credit for the UK Core requirements in either U. S. Citizenship or Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 205 INTERMEDIATE WRITING (3)
PLEASE SEE WRD 205.
 
ENG 207 BEGINNING WORKSHOP IN IMAGINATIVE WRITING: (Subtitle required) (3)
A beginning course in the craft of writing, teaching students how to read critically and how to revise work in progress. The students provide an audience for each other’s work. Exercises involve practice in aspects of craft and promote experimentation with different forms, subjects, and approaches; outside reading provides models and inspiration. Workshop. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits. Required for the Creative Writing Option in the ENG major. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. 
 
ENG 209 THE STRUCTURE AND USE OF ENGLISH (UK Core: Inquiry in the Humanities) (3)
A general survey of the history, structure, and use of the English language. Topics investigated include: the history of the English language; elements of the structure of English; the distinctive characteristics of spoken and written English and the varied registers of English; the diversity of the English lexicon; regional and social dialects of English and their representation in literature; and the ideological dimensions of English language use, especially those relating to social and political issues and controversies. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 221 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS I (3)
This is the first of two courses offered in the introductory linguistics sequence, designed for majors and minors in Linguistics, which may be of use to students in other disciplines. It provides an intense and thorough introduction to the fundamental concepts of the field, including but not limited to: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. All five of these aspects of language structure are offered as stand-alone courses at the 500 level and this course serves as a prerequisite for each. Lecture. Same as LIN 221. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 230 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (UK Core: Inquiry in the Humanities; GWR) (3)
An introduction to literary analysis through close reading and argumentative writing. The course involves studying selected texts from several genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to read closely, how to relate texts to contexts, and how to use basic literary terms and concepts. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Fulfills ENG pre-major requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 241 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I (3)
A survey of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the later seventeenth century, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the early English literary tradition. Texts and authors covered include Beowulf and Old English elegaic poetry; Middle English poetry and selections from Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales; Renaissance lyrics, sonnets, and narrative poetry; the drama of Shakespeare; selections from John Milton’s Paradise Lost; and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement and Early Period requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 242 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE II (3)
A survey of British literature from the seventeenth century to the present, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the later English literary tradition. Authors covered include the Augustan poetry of John Dryden and Alexander Pope; the early and later Romantic movements; novelists and poets of the Victorian period such as Charles Dickens, Alfred Tennyson, and Elizabeth B. Browning; the early twentieth-century Modernism of Virginia Woolf and T.S. Eliot; and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 251 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3)
A survey of American literature from its colonial origins to the Civil War, with emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of the American Colonies and antebellum United States. The course explores both the social conditions in which authors lived and wrote—such as conflicts over land with Native Americans, slavery, and the emergence of women’s rights—as well as the key developments in literary form during this period, such as the rise of the novel, the slave narrative, and the changing shape of poetry. Texts and authors covered include Susanna Rowson, Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, Frederick Douglass’ Narrative, short stories by Edgar Allen Poe, the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement and Early Period requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 252 SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3)
A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present, with an emphasis on different genres, periods, and cultural characteristics of later periods in U.S. history. The course explores the changing social conditions in which American literature was produced—such as the Roaring 20’s, the Cold War, and the upheaval of the 1960’s—and several key literary movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Texts and authors covered may include Edith Wharton’s House of Mirth, Nella Larsen’s Quicksand, Ernest Hemingway, Toni Morrison, the poetry of Marianne Moore and Elizabeth Bishop, and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 260 INTRODUCTION TO BLACK WRITERS (UK Core: Inquiry in the Humanities; GWR) (3)
An introduction to written and oral works by Black authors of Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. The course includes writers such as Chinua Achebe (Africa), Wilson Harris (Caribbean), and Toni Morrison (USA), as well as others from the diverse field of literature written by African-American authors and authors of color worldwide. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit. Same as AAAS 264.
 
ENG 265 SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3)
A survey of African-American literature from the mid-eighteenth century to Reconstruction and after, with emphasis on selected genres, periods, and thematic characteristics of the early African-American cultural and literary experience. Topics include colonialism and abolitionism; early black aesthetics, narratives of enslavement, and drama, novels, and poetry. Authors can include Jupiter Hammon, Phillis Wheatley, William Wells Brown, George Moses Horton, Martin Delaney, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, Ellen Craft, and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 266 SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3)
A survey of African-American literature from post-Reconstruction to the Black Arts Movement and beyond, with emphasis on selected genres, periods, and thematic characteristics of the later African-American cultural and literary experience to the present day. Topics include literature of the Reconstruction; poetry and dialect poetry, the “plantation tradition” and black musical traditions; Black Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance; the Black Power movement and Civil Rights. Authors may include Pauline Hopkins, Frances Harper, Sutton Griggs, Oscar Micheaux, W.E.B. DuBois, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, and more. Lecture. Fulfills ENG major Historical Survey Requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 271 THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE (3)
A course investigating selections from the Christian Bible (Old and New Testaments) in English, and from related sacred texts, as literary and cultural documents of great significance and literary achievement. Emphasis is on the careful analysis of literary forms and themes within a broadly historical and non-denominational context. Lecture. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or provide ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 274 CLASSICS OF WESTERN LITERATURE (3)
A study of selected works by major Western authors from the Bible and ancient Greek literature through the Renaissance and Enlightenment periods, and later. Emphasis is on the study of genres, themes, characters, and literary forms that have had an enduring presence in Western culture. Texts may include Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey; selections from the Old Testament; classical Greek drama; Virgil’s Aeneid; Dante’s Divine Comedy; Cervantes’ Don Quixote; and others. Lecture. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement or provide ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 280 INTRODUCTION TO FILM (UK Core: Inquiry in the Humanities; GWR) (3)
An introduction to the study of films as narrative art and cultural documents. The course involves viewing and analyzing films from different genres and investigating a unified theme or set of topics. Students will learn how to view films closely, how to relate films to their contexts, and how to employ the basic terms and concepts of film analysis. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. Viewing films outside of class is required. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective credit. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 284 HISTORY OF FILM I (3)
An introduction to the history of film as art and industry from the invention of the moving picture to World War II. Emphasis is on the artistic development of the silent film in America and Europe, the rise of the American studio system, and the emergence of sound in film in the 1930’s. Filmmakers may include the Lumiere brothers, Georges Meliès, Buster Keaton, D. W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, King Vidor, Alan Crosland, Leni Riefenstahl, and others. Lecture. Viewing films outside of class is required. Does not fulfill Historical Survey requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 285 HISTORY OF FILM II (3)
A chronological survey of narrative film (primarily American) from World War II to the present, concentrating on both canonical films (such as Hitchcock’s Vertigo) and often overlooked examples of cult, low budget, and independent film.  Many paradigms of the major genres are included: musical, film noir, gangster, screwball comedy, horror and science fiction, western, and more. This survey also examines more idiosyncratic work of auteur directors (Nicholas Ray, Jane Campion), films capturing a specific  sociopolitical moment (Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing), and larger cinematic movements such as Italian neo-realism, French New Wave cinema, and the New Hollywood of the 70’s. Lecture. Viewing films outside of class is required. Does not fulfill ENG Historical Survey requirement. Can be taken for ENG Major Elective requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 290 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S LITERATURE (UK Core: Inquiry in the Hum.; GWR) (3)
An introduction to the rich traditions of women’s writing, focusing on some important issues and representative examples. Students will read canonical and non-canonical works, discuss continuities and differences among women writers, and master some of the concepts of gender studies. Attention will be paid to student writing, particularly to devising a thesis, crafting an argument, and learning how to use supporting evidence. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Offers UK Core credit for Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities. Does not fulfill ENG premajor requirement. Provides ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 301 STYLE FOR WRITERS (3)
This course is designed for those who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others. While the course may include some account of historical changes in prose style and require some stylistic analysis of literary texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students’ own writing. Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination, subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace. Same as WRD 301. No prerequisites. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 310 AMERICAN ENGLISH (3)
The study of the varieties of modern American English: regional, social, and ethnic varieties, gender differences in communication, creoles and pidgins, stylistic variation. History and methods of American dialect study. Same as LIN 310. No prerequisites.  Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 330 TEXT AND CONTEXT: (Subtitle required) (3)
The core course in the English Major focusing on the close reading and analysis of a single major literary text, or a focused set of texts, in historical and critical context. Students will develop analytical and interpretive skills that deepen their historical and conceptual understanding of literature, as well as their skills of critical reading, writing, and presentation. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. ENG major and minor requirement. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent and either ENG 107, or ENG 209, or ENG 230. 
 
ENG 337 LITERATURE AND GENRE
An advanced course exploring one or two literary genres or formal categories. It focuses on analyzing the parameters and practices of a broad generic category (e.g. the short story; lyric poetry; epic and mock-epic; autobiography; the bildungsroman; protest literature) or a genre specific to a particular period (e.g. mid-century American crime novels; Elizabethan songs and sonnets; Victorian drama). Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition and Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. May fulfill ENG Early Period requirement depending on the course: see departmental listings for different offerings per semester.
 
ENG 338 TOPICS IN LITERATURE: (Subtitle required) (3)
An advanced course exploring a focused literary topic across various periods, genres, styles, and media. It focuses on the creative connections in literature unifying a shared set of themes or topical concerns (e.g., narratives of travel; the family through history; stories about work and play; ethnic identities; nature and the natural world). See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. May fulfill ENG Early Period requirement depending on the course: see departmental listings for different offerings per semester.
 
ENG 339 AUTHOR STUDIES: (Subtitle required) (3)
An advanced course exploring the works of a single important author of English literature, or literature in translation, from any period or nationality. It focuses on developing a strong familiarity with the oeuvre of a specific important writer. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. May fulfill ENG Early Period requirement depending on the course: see departmental listings for different offerings per semester.
 
ENG 341 CHAUCER AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES (3)
A course covering medieval English literature from around the years 1350-1450 and centering on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1340-1400), particularly his early dream-visions and The Canterbury Tales. Other authors and texts may include William Langland’s Piers Plowman; the poetry of John Gower; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and the works of the Pearl-Poet; Thomas Hoccleve; Margery Kempe; anonymous romances and Arthurian narratives; and more. Topics include courtly love and chivalry; Christian spirituality; women and gender roles; feudal politics and rebellion. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Fulfills the ENG Early Period requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 342 SHAKESPEARE (3)
A course offering advanced study of a representative selection of Shakespeare’s plays across the length of his career. It situates Shakespeare within Renaissance theatre culture: the playhouses and audiences he wrote for, the structure of his acting company, and the patronage system that supported their business. Students will learn how his plays departed from received ideas about dramatic genres and in some instances set new standards for how certain types of plays should look and feel. Students will also gain a sense of how interpretations of individual plays have changed over time and how later periods and audiences continue to make Shakespeare their own. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Fulfills the ENG Early Period requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 343 RENAISSANCE DRAMA AND SOCIETY (3)
This course studies Elizabethan and Jacobean drama by Shakespeare’s predecessors and contemporaries. Although most people identify Shakespeare as the representative Renaissance playwright, he was only one member of a distinguished generation. Students will encounter a variety of popular dramatic genres in which Shakespeare either did not work or that he heavily adapted to his own ends: Turk plays, city comedy, unperformed “closet drama,” revenge tragedy, pastoral. Readings include playwrights such as Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, Elizabeth Cary, Lady Mary Wroth, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, and others; and topics such as tragedy and comedy, sex and romance, urban life and the value of money, and racial and religious difference. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Fulfills the ENG Early Period requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 345 BRITISH POETRY (3)
This course provides a selective encounter with the poetry of the British tradition. Texts and topics may be drawn from the later Renaissance (16th century) up through the present day, exploring the depth, history, and continued vitality of British poetry. Particular attention is paid to the formal aspects and skills of reading poetry in different periods and styles. Reading can include authors and texts such as the sonnets and songs of Philip Sidney and Shakespeare; the verse of John Milton and other seventeenth-century poets; Alexander Pope and his contemporaries; Victorians and pre-Raphaelites such as E. B. Browning and Christina Rossetti; Modernists such as Ezra Pound, W. B. Yeats, and H.D.; and contemporary British, Irish, and Scottish poets. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 347 THE RISE OF THE BRITISH NOVEL (3)
What is the novel and how did it begin? Why did it development at a specific moment in history and what counted as fiction before that time? What makes one novel “literature” and another “trash”? In this course we explore the early decades of the novel to better understand prose fiction and how it came to be a dominant genre in English literature. Readings can include works by Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Laurence Sterne, Frances Burney, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen (including selected cinematic adaptations), and more. Topics can include the novel in history and the history of the novel; the evolving cultural practices of novel-reading; eighteenth-century fiction and contemporary popular culture. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 348 VICTORIAN NOVELS AND THEIR WORLDS (3)
This course examines the development of the novel as a literary and cultural form at the moment of its greatest impact during the Victorian era (1837-1901). It focuses on the emergence of the realist novel and other modes that intersected and competed with it (e.g. the gothic, the supernatural, sensation fiction, the New Woman novel), to explore the complex ways that represented different realities. The course also addresses contemporary issues such as new ideas about human psychology; gender, domesticity, and The Woman Question; social status and class conflict; science and religion; race and empire. Authors may include Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Oscar Wilde, Olive Schreiner, and more. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 349 MODERNISM (3)
A course on Modernist Literature: British, Irish and American writing from the first half of the twentieth century. Virginia Woolf once tried to explain modernism by claiming, “On or about December 1910 human character changed.” Much of the writing of the period might be read as an attempt to record and understand that change. Texts include the fiction, poetry, drama, and essays from writers such as Woolf, James Joyce, T.S. Eliot, W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, Wyndham Lewis and Gertrude Stein. The literature of the period will be examined in relation to various contexts and backgrounds, including the experience of war, the breakup of empire, and other major events and upheavals. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 352 AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURES TO 1900 (3)
This course focuses on selected literary movements and their relationships to American culture up through 1900. Authors studied can include Susanna Rowson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Harriet Jacobs, and Henry James. Topics may include American imperialism, slavery and abolition, the rise of the historical novel, Sentimentalism, Romanticism, and the emergence of psychological realism. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 353 AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURES POST-1900 (3)
This course focuses on selected literary movements and their relationships to American culture since 1900. Authors studied can include Edith Wharton, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Allen Ginsberg, Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, Thomas Pynchon, and others. Topics may include the literatures of World War I, the Cold War, the Beat Generation, the New Social Movements of the 1960’s, Postmodernism, and more. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 355 AMERICAN POETIC TRADITIONS (3)
A course investigating contrasting traditions of American poetry from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  Several poets are examined within historical and literary contexts, and their poems examined in detail through close reading, with attention paid in particular to stylistic/formal characteristics.  Poets studied include Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens, and others. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 357 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
A course examining contemporary American fiction primarily since the 1970s and 1980s, as well as the diverse categories by which its critics and readers have sought to identify it: minimalism, hyperrealism, postmodernism, cyberpunk, the magical real. The class investigates contemporary authors in order to generate the key terms and problems for approaching work in diverse current genres, from science fiction and graphic novels to historical novels and self-consciously “literary” fiction. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 359 THE KENTUCKY LITERARY HERITAGE (3)
A course exploring the rich literary heritage of the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the greater Appalachian region, surveying its local history and diversity as well as its wider significance for American art. Authors covered can include early figures such as William Wells Brown, the first African-American novelist, and John Fox Jr., the first million-selling novelist; Robert Penn Warren, first Poet Laureate of the United States and author of All the King’s Men; Elizabeth Madox Roberts; Harriette Arnow, winner of the National Book Award in 1954 for The Dollmaker; counter-cultural writers of the 60’s and 70’s such as Hunter S. Thompson, Gurney Norman, and Ed McClanahan; contemporary Kentucky writers such as Wendell Berry, Erik Reece, Bobbie Ann Mason, Sara Jeter Naslund, C. E. Morgan, Kim Edwards, and Gayle Jones; and contemporary award-winning poets such as Frank X Walker, Nikky Finney, and Maurice Manning. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 361 EARLY AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
This course investigates selected writers of the early African-American tradition, primarily from the mid-eighteenth century to post-Reconstruction. Inquiry focuses on the literary modes and genres that were central to the creation of a distinct African-American literary voice and canon, including slave narratives, folklore, poetry, drama, and more. Authors can include Phyllis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, William Wells Brown, Frances Harper, Charles Chesnutt, Martin Delaney, Sojourner Truth, and others. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. ENG 265 or 266 are recommended but not required. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 362 FLIGHTS TO FREEDOM: LITERATURE OF THE GREAT BLACK MIGRATIONS (3)
Between 1910 and 1930 more than one million African Americans migrated from the rural South to the urban North. This course focuses on the development of African-American migration narratives from the slave era to the contemporary moment. It examines literary, musical, artistic, and journalistic representations of the Great Migrations that capture the experiences of African-Americana as they moved not only from the South to the North, but also from the South to the Midwest and the West in pursuit of better economic opportunities and political freedom. Readings are drawn from writers such as William and Ellen Craft, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Paul Laurence Dunbar, James Weldon Johnson, Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, Ann Petry, Dorothy West, Pearl Cleage, August Wilson, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, Colson Whitehead, and others. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. ENG 260, 265, or 266 are recommended but not required. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 368 CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN-AMERICAN VOICES (3)
Encompassing an array of genres and forms, this course examines black culture, literature, and performance from mid-20th century to present. It engages aesthetic, critical, and political issues related to seminal periods such as the Black Arts Movement of 1960’s, the Third Renaissance of 1980’s-90’s, and the ascent of the first U.S. president of African descent. This course examines how forms of performance such as folklore and work songs, the blues, jazz, and rap, all shape cultural and literary production. Authors may include Lorraine Hansberry, Ernest Gaines, Gloria Naylor, Ice Cube, Cornell West, Marlon Riggs, Tupac, India Arie, Percival Everett, Nikky Finney, Natasha Tretheway, Barack Obama, and others. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 369 AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN’S WRITING (3)
This course analyzes the literary and visual representation of black women from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. It explores how selected writers, working across different genres, render black female characters in ways that perpetuate, contest, or subvert stereotypical images of black women. Texts and authors may include Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Frances Harper’s Trial and Triumph, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks’ Maud Martha (1953), Toni Cade Bambara’s Gorilla, My Love (1972), Toni Morrison’s Sula (1973), and contemporary authors such as Ann Allen Shockley, Gayl Jones, Nikky Finney, and others. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 370 LITERATURE ACROSS BORDERS (3)
A course examining literature as a product of multiple regional, national, and international contexts. How do texts, ideas, goods, and people move across borders? How are identities and concepts produced through transnational dialogue and exchange? Possible areas of study include transatlantic political or literary movements, border studies, multinational literatures, or literatures of migration and diaspora. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 380 FILM AND GENRE: (Subtitle required) (3)
An advanced course exploring one or two film genres, styles, or formal categories. It focuses on analyzing the parameters and practices of a broad generic category (e.g. gangster films; documentaries; biographies; war films) or a genre specific to a particular period (e.g. early silent films; twentieth-century horror films). Viewing films outside of class is required. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. ENG 280, 284, or 285 are recommended but not required. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 384 LITERATURE AND FILM (3)
This course explores the relationship between two creative traditions, literature and film, focusing on film adaptations of literary works for the screen. Subjects can include the adaptation of works by a particular writer such as Shakespeare or Jane Austen, or it may range more widely among the thousands of innovative cinematic reinventions of literary texts, e.g. Richardson’s Tom Jones, Altman’s Short Cuts. In some semesters the course may focus on a particular topic or genre and its treatment in both literary and cinematic texts, or on a particular moment when cinema and literary writers exerted a strong mutual influence (such as Hollywood in the 1920’s). Viewing films outside of class is required. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. ENG 280, 284, or 285 recommended but not required. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 391 LITERARY THEORY (3)
Since the 1940’s “literary theory” has emerged as a vibrant and vital aspect of literary studies. The term covers a wide range of formal, historical, and critical approaches to literature and culture that have changed the ways we read. This course investigates selected trends and schools of modern literary theory in diverse texts and contexts. These can include formalism, Practical Criticism, and the New Criticism; French Structuralism and the various modes of post-structuralism (Semiotics, Deconstruction, Reader-response, Speech-act theory); historicism and the New Historicism; as well as broader modes of cultural critique such as Feminism, Marxism, Critical Theory and the Frankfurt School, Post-colonialism, Critical Race Theory, and more. Prerequisite: completion of UK Core Composition & Communication I-II requirement or equivalent. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 395 INDEPENDENT WORK (1-3 variable credit)
For undergraduate majors in English with high standing. Students pursue an independent course of study, tutorial, or directed project under the guidance of a faculty member, with appropriate assessment and grading (e.g., term paper(s), examinations, final project). Projects are generally proposed and arranged by students themselves, reflecting individual interests and goals. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: ENG major with a major GPA of 3.0 or above; prior permission of faculty advisor and ENG chairperson; approved Learning Contract. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies for information. Provides ENG Major Elective credit. 
 
ENG 401 SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING: (Subtitle required) (3)
Studies of special topics in writing, in areas such as literary nonfiction (essays), responding to literature, cultural critique, and composing law and justice. Topics announced the preceding semester. Same as WRD 401. Prerequisite: completion of University Writing requirement; consent of instructor. Provides ENG Major Elective credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Does not fulfill ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 405 EDITING ENGLISH PROSE (3)
This course is designed for students interested in the basics of editing and publishing and offers instruction and extensive practice in editing and revising both the student’s own writing and the prose works of others. In addition to learning techniques of revision, verification of sources, and preparation of manuscripts, students will be expected to learn about the editing profession generally and to follow trends in editing and publishing. Not for students with writing deficiencies. Same as WRD 405. Prerequisite ENG 301 or ENG 306, or consent of instructor. Provides ENG Major Elective credit. Does not fulfill ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 407 INTERMEDIATE WORKSHOP IN IMAGINATIVE WRITING: (Subtitle required) (3)
Continued studies in the writer’s craft, focusing on student work but with increased emphasis on outside reading. Areas of workshop practice include Poetry, Fiction, and Creative Non-Fiction. Prerequisite ENG 207 or consent of instructor. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit. Can count only once for ENG Major 400-level course requirement.
 
ENG 440G STUDIES IN BRITISH LITERATURE: (Subtitle required) (3)
An advanced British Literature course on a period, a theme, a genre, or one or more authors. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. Prerequisite ENG 330 Text and Context or consent of the instructor. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 450G STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE: (Subtitle required) (3)
An advanced American Literature course on a period, a theme, a genre, or one or more authors. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. Prerequisite ENG 330 Text and Context or consent of the instructor. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit.
 
ENG 460G STUDIES IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE: (Subtitle required) (3)
An advanced African-American literature course on a period, a theme, a genre, or one or more authors. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. Prerequisite ENG 330 Text and Context or consent of the instructor. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 470G COMPARATIVE AND TRANSNATIONAL STUDIES IN LITERATURE: (3)
(Subtitle required)
An advanced literature course focusing on comparative or transnational periods, themes, genres, national or ethnic traditions, or one or more authors. Possible areas of study include transatlantic connections, diasporic communities, or comparisons between English language authors and foreign authors in translation. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. Prerequisite ENG 330 Text and Context or consent of the instructor. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 480G STUDIES IN FILM: (Subtitle required) (3)
An advanced course in the history, analysis, criticism, and theory of film. Viewing of films outside of class is required. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. Prerequisite ENG 330 Text and Context or consent of the instructor. ENG 281 strongly recommended. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 490G STUDIES IN LITERATURE AND GENDER: (Subtitle required) (3)
An advanced course focusing on any aspect of gender in literary studies, such as gender and genre, gender issues in a particular literary period, masculinity, minority women writers, or feminist literary theory. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. Prerequisite ENG 330 Text and Context or consent of the instructor. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit.
 
ENG 491G STUDIES IN THEORY: (Subtitle required) (3)
An advanced course on any aspect of literary or critical theory, in relation to selected texts. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. Prerequisite ENG 330 Text and Context or consent of the instructor. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 492G CULTURAL STUDIES: (Subtitle required) (3)
An advanced course on any aspect of cultural studies, in relation to selected texts. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 hours under different subtitles. Prerequisite ENG 330 Text and Context or consent of the instructor. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 495 MAJOR HONORS SEMINAR: (Subtitle required) (3)
An advanced undergraduate seminar in literature, film, or cultural study. Honors seminar topics will be announced the preceding year. Required for graduation with Departmental Honors in English. Prerequisites: ENG major; completion of premajor requirements and ENG 330; ENG major GPA of 3.5 or above. Enrollment limited to junior and senior ENG majors. May be repeated up to 9 hours under different subtitles. Fulfills ENG Major 400-level course requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit.
 
ENG 507 ADVANCED WORKSHOP IN IMAGINATIVE WRITING: (Subtitle required) (3)
For the student who has shown marked talent and commitment, this course provides a rigorous workshop among peers and includes additional attention to outside reading. Each student will produce a chapbook of poems or stories. See departmental listings for different offerings per semester. Prerequisite ENG 207 and ENG 407, or the equivalent, and consent of the instructor. May be repeated with the same or different subtitle to a maximum of 6 credits. Required under two different subtitles for the ENG Imaginative Writing Option. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 509 COMPOSITION FOR TEACHERS (3)
A course covering the basic studies helpful to teachers of composition at the secondary level. Focuses on the teaching of grammar, punctuation, usage, etc., and on theme planning, correction, and revision. Students are required to do quite a bit of writing. Same as EDC 509. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 510 STUDIES IN ENGLISH FOR TEACHERS: (Subtitle required) (3)
Specialized advanced studies designed to increase a secondary school teacher’s knowledge in English literature and language arts, and to widen understanding of new developments and approaches to the teaching of English. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Same as EDC 510. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 512 ANALYSIS OF ENGLISH SYNTAX (3)
Contemporary approaches to the syntactic analysis of Modern English; particular attention is devoted to Chomskyan syntactic theory. Prerequisite ENG/LIN 221 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Same as LIN 512. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 513 TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (3)
The course will examine the current theories and methods of teaching English as a second language. The course will include (1) language learning theory as it relates to other disciplines; (2) methods and techniques of contrastive analysis. Prerequisite: One course in linguistics or consent of instructor. Same as EDC/LIN 513. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 514 TESL MATERIALS AND METHODS (3)
An extension of ENG/EDC 513, this course will include examination and evaluation of published materials designed for teaching English to speakers of other languages. Students will create individualized teaching materials and gain practical experience in applying the methods and using their own materials. Prerequisite: ENG/EDC 513 or consent of instructor. Same as EDC/LIN 514. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 518 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3)
This course explores the development of English from its roots in Indo-European, through Old, Middle, and Early Modern English(es), culminating with a review of the English languages of today. It focuses on the phonological, grammatical, and lexical changes of the language, as well as on the social contexts of the rise and spread of English as a contemporary world language. Special emphasis is given to a linguistically informed understanding of how the language has changed in response to political and historical pressures. Same as LIN 518. Fulfills ENG major Early Period Requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 
ENG 519 INTRODUCTION TO OLD ENGLISH (3)
An introduction to the study of the Old English language and its literature from the 8th to the 11th centuries. Emphasis on learning the basic vocabulary and grammar of Old English in the West Saxon standard written dialect. Readings include excerpts from prose and poetry, the basics of Old English verse forms and alliterative poetry, and some historical and cultural background. The course is particularly recommended for students of European languages (especially German) and Linguistics; some basic background in Linguistics is recommended but not required. Same as LIN 519. Fulfills ENG major Early Period Requirement. Provides ENG Major Elective credit and ENG minor credit.
 

 

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